25

I find that using my primary hand (my writing hand) is better than the other one. Keep eyes on the road, you should not have to look to find your bottle. I use my teeth to open the sippy valve, breathe in and then take a small drink and hold it for a sec before swallowing. Sometimes I hold the bottle over the bars for 5-10 seconds to let the first ...


12

Each type and size of tire has a different pressure range. The range is written or embossed right on the side of the tire. The actual pressure you choose is dependent on what you are using the bike for, the road surface you ride on and your general preference. A safe choice the middle of the specified pressure range. Lower pressure will give a bit more ...


12

I’ve been riding mostly fixed gear for, oh, maybe ten years now. I use bmx pedals with straps. Straps You really ought to practice getting in and out of them until it becomes second nature. Having problems getting clipped in or getting your foot through the strap means you won’t have a rear brake (not ideal). Having problems getting out means you end up ...


7

From my experience, the single most important point is properly choosing your route. Google maps and the satellite view are your friends. For example, there is a 2x2 lanes road nearby. I see cyclists there quite often when I drive. It is an extremely dangerous road, 90 km/h, big lorries, no shoulder. There is a smaller, parallel road though. It is very nice ...


7

I switched to CamelBak's podium bottle, which has a lock and a self-sealing "Jet Valve" that only has water come out if you squeeze really hard. This has made the whole process easier (and better for your teeth)! Also, if you keep one hand on a handlebar, and use your sense of touch with the other hand, you never have to take your eyes off the road! My ...


7

Remove bottle from bottle cage and keep riding using the hand not holding the bottle Pull up the cap with teeth Squeeze bottle in the mouth (if soft bottle) or suck liquid in (if hard bottle) Swallow and repeat if necessary Push back bottle cap with mouth/teeth Place bottle back in bottle cage Any problem with the above sequence is either due to: lack of ...


7

Bicycles Stack Exchange prohibits recommending products, but we can offer principles to use when shopping. The key to choosing the right bicycle is matching the bike to the kind of riding you want to do. I apologize for the length of the post - this is a complicated topic. Generally speaking, you can narrow your search to just a few bikes by: ...


6

I commute on a fixie sometimes. I'm not interested in fancy specialist skills, and am totally happy having brakes on my bike, so for me fixie skills come down to two things above and beyond "regular" cycling skills: Remember to keep pedalling! It took 2 or 3 rides for this become second-nature. You'll probably have a couple of occasions where you try to ...


5

With respect to riding in a group, or with more numerous riders closer to you than you are used to. Be aware of the space around you Maintain a safe distance from riders in front Look sideways and over your shoulders before overtaking or maneuvering When cornering be aware of riders to you sides and give them space When slowing down, hold up a hand palm ...


5

There's a lot of questions in here. My suggestion is to read through https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help and http://sheldonbrown.com/ instead of asking a separate question for everything. Brake cables are thicker than shift cables, and the outer cables are constructed differently. There are different variants of the cable ends for both, you need the ...


5

EDIT As ojs points out in the comments below, the freehub's width of 7-speed systems mismatches those of 8- to 10-speeds. This means the rear hub/wheel has to be changed as well, in addition to everything listed below. Clearly a cost of such change now would exceed the price of a half new bike. It would require changing the complete drivetrain and the rear ...


5

20.5" is way to big. You likely want something more around 18.5". There are a number of bmx bike sizing charts out on the net to help guide you. Two examples are: https://www.usabmx.com/tracks/1709/pages/492 https://www.danscomp.com/serve/products%7Ccharts/riderchart.htm Other items you'll want to consider changing in addition to the frame size are going ...


5

I originally used to prefer to drink with my right (primary) hand but now prefer to use the left, with the right controlling steering and covering the brake (the front brake on my case as I'm in the UK. Because I only drink water while actually riding, I always drink from the bottle in the downtube cage. This is always a squeezy bottle. This is much exist ...


5

As a fixie novice myself I'd suggest getting, and getting familiar with, clipless pedals and the shoes to match. Straps are only really an option if you can stop strapped in and lean on something while you undo them, as at the track. I deliberately ignore track stands at this stage. They are a very useful technique in stop-start conditions, though they ...


4

Also have your water bottle positioned tilted up to the side of your face. So you're sipping from the side of your mouth. You won't have to bend your head back as far, as apposed to sipping from the front. Chris Froome gave me the idea when I watched the Tour de France


4

I'll throw another answer it now that you posted pictures which give some more info. Cassette sprockets do not look worn, neither do the chainrings, which probably means the bike has not been ridden very much. Most of the deterioration is due to sitting and slowly rusting. This is actually good news for you as you can refurbish most of the bike, not have to ...


4

Hydraulic disc brakes - yes. These are now available on Shimano's lower end Altus, Acera and Alivio groupsets so there no reason to not have them. A 3x9 drivetrain will give you the low ratios you need to tackle hilly country. A 2x10 or 2x11 drivetrain will also work if the cassette has large enough small sprockets. If you are riding on roads, you will ...


3

If you have never ridden this long, pace yourself. It is better to finish in 5 hours than to do 1/2 the ride in 2hours but be tired to finish. Break it up into three 25km rides. Ride 25 km and stop, walk a bit, eat something and rehydrate. This type of ride is a charity event not meant to be a race. Also be aware that the crowds are likely to be full of ...


3

FYI, not to confuse people, it's not a race, but a "ride"; Event info "Participants who weave, pass at high speeds or cycle at high speeds in a group/peloton are considered unsafe and will be removed from the event by Toronto Police Services." Ride at your own pace; ride straight, don't make sudden movements... Keep hydrated, have a full water bottle on ...


3

Cadence - mostly down to personal preference, but the most common advice is actually to aim for 90-100rpm. I honestly wouldn't worry too much about it though. Food - don't try out something on the day that you didn't test beforehand - when working hard, this can lead to unfortunate emergency visits to the bushes! Clothing - Similar to above, don't try ...


3

The good news is that Raleigh is a reputable brand, and compatible with standard components. Brake and shift cables are not the same, they have different fittings on the end to attach to the brake lever or shifter. That said, they can be bought inexpensively as a kit - front and rear shift cables, front and rear brake cables. They'll work on almost any ...


3

Bicycle mechanical cables has not changed much since 1990's. The main difference between brake cables and shifting cables is in diameters. Shifters use 1.2 mm wire and brakes use 1.5 mm wire. Both types should also have matching housing. Brake cables have different "heads" types — barrel (for MTB) or a drop (for road). Make sure you use the same type of ...


3

Adding to others answers If you are working and breathing hard, swallowing a mouthful of liquid without choking can be a challenge. Take small mouthfuls to avoid choking. If you do get more liquid in your mouth than you can cope with, tip your head forward so the liquid runs to the front of your mouth, you will then be able to swallow it in parts. Also, if ...


2

Like mentioned before take it slow and work up to a steady cadence. I try to keep my cadence uniform and not concentrate so much on speed. That being said, I really drive through the watts when climbing to keep cadence up. Meaning I tend to wait longer until I switch to a higher gear ( easier pedaling but slower progression) and sometimes with shift down ...


2

Practice. I moved to hilly area a few years ago: I now climb hills by standing on the pedals in a medium gear. I used to climb hills sitting down and "spinning" n the lowest gear, and sometimes stopping half way up to catch my breath. I used to stand on the pedals for a few strokes before getting exhausted. Now I can do it (stand on the pedals) for about ...


2

Congratulations on the 50 miles and deciding to get back into the sport. An 'adventure' bike is probably a good choice for getting back on a bike if you want a road style bike (i.e. one with drop handlebars) that can take on some rough road surfaces and is comfortable to ride. The characteristics you want to look for are: More relaxed riding position (...


2

Let's assume that by 'road bars' you mean drop style handlebars. You can replace the bars, but you will also need to find some drop bar brake lever / gear shifter units that work with the existing brake calipers and derailleurs. Looks like someone fitted a riser bar and stem and some inexpensive twist shifters. We can't see if the derailleurs have been ...


2

what is the lowest acceptable pressure that is ok for tires? The lowest acceptable pressure for a tyre on a wheel on a bicycle varies, but will be high enough to not pinch flat on a rock or pothole by letting the rim squid through/around the rubber and hit the ground high enough to not squirm when cornering fast high enough to avoid coming off the rim high ...


2

Start with a bike. Does not have to be new, for budget reasons and because you don't really know what you want, or what you will find comfortable. Try a used hybrid or commuter, then get a half-year riding on that. You'll figure out whether you want to go faster on the road or more off-road, or whether you just like tootling about, which is a fine reason ...


2

Specific recommendations are off topic here, but my general advice would be to start out looking at the big, ubiquitous brands: Trek, Specialized, Giant, Cannondale etc. that your local bike stores offer. Those are are all 'solid' and dependable brands. These brands offer a wide range of models at a range of price points. The local bike stores will have a ...


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