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26

Adding threads to any sort of bolt under tension doesn't actually make it much stronger, beyond the first ≈5 threads. Adding more basically just adds dead mass; either way the whole thing will generally fail somewhere close to the first thread. So, filling the bore with threads wouldn't have any benefit. What it would do however is move the expected point of ...


13

Spoke washers are used at the hub end, between the flared out cap and the hub itself. The intention is to take up extra length between the bend and the end, to help prevent the spoke from breaking. Common use is on hubs with thin flanges (for lightweight or because they're cheap) and on heavier loaded bikes to spread the load. Notice how the lower spoke ...


13

If you take the rim tape off you should be able to shake it out through one of the holes that you insert the nipples through. I've dropped a few inside rims and never had a problem getting them out this way.


12

The bore guides the thread of the spoke to the threading of the nipple allowing easier spoking with less risk of cross-threading. The bore also allows the spoke to be threaded deeper w/o adding more threading to the spoke. Imagine you want to thread the spoke all the way into the nipple. If there wasn't a bore, but the inside thread of the nipple would ...


7

I have never heard of anything like this, and here are my thoughts on why this concept has not been made: My guess is that suspension at the rim and outer end of the spoke will effectively re-tension the spoke every time the rim rotates. Suspension only works when it has room to move in both directions, and also has a damper to resist oscillation. We know ...


7

I agree with Daniel’s comment, I’ve had success with using vice grips to hold spikes myself. Be careful not to use excessive force to prevent crushing the spoke. It may help to add a small “flag” made of tape to each spoke to help visualize spoke vs nipple rotation. Matt’s suggestion of using penetrating oil and heat is a good idea, provided you removed the ...


6

That's an unusual rust pattern but not impossible. Your wheel has a cloth rim strip? Those hold moisture from rain and road dampness. There's a chance your rim is not particularly waterproof, so moisture enters through the bead, possibly the spoke holes around the nipples, and maybe even through the tyre carcass. Plus there's sweating/condensation when ...


5

Original MTB brake lever designs did not include a rotating barrel inside the lever to account for the change in angle as you apply the brake, so the wire end needed to be round to accommodate this. Road bike brakes have had the interior rotating barrel for a very long time. If the wire end does not rotate, the brake wire will be flexed in a "coat hanger"...


5

With wire (and spokes) a larger number for gauge is a smaller diameter. This is why the metric conversion seems the other way around. 14 / 2mm is the larger diameter here, and yes, it's at the ends, or rather, the hub end. Straight spokes are straight, single butted are thicker at the hub end, double are thicker at both ends, and triple butted are ...


5

It's a Shimano Positron shift cable. The outer housing is also special. Picture from WorthPoint.com I found a few for sale on ebay - not an endorsement. There were two Positron systems. The first one was very complicated. The since there was no return spring the rear derailleur had two cables to pull back and forth. The later version had one solid wire ...


4

Nipple wrench flat sizes don't correspond to spoke gauge in as clean or universal of a way as you're suggesting. This depends a little on where you are in the world (and in history), but 2mm aka 14g spokes are by far the most common for bicycles, and there are three different common size nipples associated with them: 0.127", 0.130", and 0.136". (These ...


4

The "bore" allows the unthreaded portion of the spoke to enter the nipple body, eliminating the need to thread the spoke more or use a shorter nipple. This is especially useful in some wheel-building factories where, to simplify operations, the same length spoke is used on both sides of a wheel, and any protrusion beyond the nipple end is ground off. Note ...


4

I would just replace the single nipple that is broken with a new brass nipple. It sounds like these wheels are not very expensive so I wouldn't want to invest a whole lot more time and money in replacing something that may or may not be a problem in the future.


4

I would guess that the etymology is by analogy – the closest existing hardware to a spoke nipple was/is a pipe nipple so that when wheel makers started looking for a name for the little thing with the threads that tensions the spokes someone thought that they looked a bit like tiny pipe nipples and the name stuck.


4

In plumbing and piping, a nipple is a fitting, consisting of a short piece of pipe, usually provided with a male pipe thread at each end, for connecting two other fittings. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nipple_%28plumbing%29 This is from the wikipedia entry on the plumbing and piping context of the word Nipple as suggested by Daniel R. Hicks' comment. ...


3

I'm not sure about building a wheel using just the screw slot – I think you could probably do it, but I suspect that it would be a painful process. If you tried it, you'd want to be sure that the spoke lengths were exactly right. Much of the strength of the spoke comes from engaging with the threads in the wider section of the nipple that is on the inside of ...


2

I have the same double butted spoke on my bike and the correct nipple size is 14 gauge. Here's a note from my bike store: The 14/15 gauge measurement on the spoke actually refers to the fact that they are a butted spoke, 14g at the ends and a narrower 15g in the middle (to make them lighter but still strong)... Yes, 14G is the size for the spoke ...


2

5.5mm spoke holes sounds ridiculously large and it would not surprise me if that's not correct. Ryde don't mention it on their generic V38 page nor do "Flying Pigeon" on their Westwood listing but they do suggest 2.0mm spokes. No mention of needing large head nipples though. If you can try the large head in the rim before buying definitely do that. ...


2

Here's measurements from 3 in my immediate vicinity: Sapim Sil Brass 14G 12mm, I believe featuring the Sapim Polyax design: 3.7mm Wheelsmith Duristan BN14 (Silver 14g Brass): 3.82mm DT Sil Brass 14g (I think): 3.9mm (I don't have al nipples to measure at home, sorry.) That's more variance than I would have expected. One major point of design ...


2

This is a strange problem you're describing. Having them chronically come loose to the point of falling off is not a common problem, and even so the obvious solution is more/proper tension, but if the wheel was essentially rebuilt already (all new nipples?) then one would hope it's in the reasonable ballpark, 100-120kgf drive side depending on the parts used....


1

A thicker ring around a rod, counterintuitively, doesn't strengthen it, especially if there is a sharp transition from thin to thick. It weakens it, by creating what is called a stress riser - think of clamping a square metal rod in a vise and gripping it with pliers, you will have an easier not harder time breaking it, since the clamped portions can NOT ...


1

What is the purpose of the bore? Perhaps so that the threaded part of the spoke is covered by the nipple? Wouldn't the nipple be stronger with longer threads? Yes. Are there disadvantages to using longer threads /sacrificing some of the length of the bore to add more thread length)? Apparently not, as you don't hear people complaining about spokes ...


1

There are spoke wreches which compare many different sizes in one tool. Not that expensive either. They look like this: I have two of these and have thus far not come across a size that wasn't on the tool (working on over 30 bikes.)


1

14G and 2mm are synonymous concerning the spoke thread. It should just fit. The flats should have a distance of 3.23mm. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spoke_wrench


1

For most of the last 50 years, higher quality rims had steel eyelets at the spoke holes to distribute stress and double-wall rims had ferrules that were crimped by the eyelets and which distributed the stress of the spoke to the outer wall, as well. Mid-range, double-wall rims would sometimes have the eyelets without the ferrules. Adding this extra steel (...


1

Those are Motorcycle spoke nipples. Bicycles can have different spokes and nipples between the front and rear wheels but there is no standard.


1

The square part varies depending on the manufacturer and it determines which spoke wrench you use. I've seen multiple nipples for the same gauge spoke that used different wrench sizes. There is also slight variation in where the nipple is threaded, which means some can work with slightly shorter spokes. I'll have to take a look at a box of old nipples, but I'...


1

From the Online Etymology Dictionary: Nyppell, dating from the 1530s, for a protuberance of a mammalian breast where the milk duct terminates in females, as an alteration of Neble from the 1520s, itself likely a diminutive of Neb (beak), making it a little beak, or little projection. The usage for small mechanical projections isn't attested before 1713, so ...


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