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28

Most of the noise comes from pawls on the freewheel hitting against the splines on the engagment surfaces which makes up the racheting unit. Some reasons for the noise between freewheels? Tension on pawls could be higher causing more noise as they glide over the engagment surfaces High end freewheels have more pawls and engagement points than lower end ...


17

This is a more detailed answer. I cautiously don't agree with Chris that the OP needs to stop riding the wheel, but it does depend on how the rim is constructed. Basically, the aluminum piece is a sleeve of some sort. The sleeves are structural elements in some but not all rims. I believe it is not a structural element in this rim, which the OP described as ...


12

I know this is an old question, but I think I have come up with a nice solution to this problem. I am an engineer and I have dealt with some vibration issues in scientific equipment. When I got my trainer and felt the vibration in the floor, I decided to apply the same principles to this problem. Vibration vs. Acoustic Transmission The first thing to ...


10

Could be any number of things. The first thing to check (because ignoring it can rapidly cause expensive damage) is that the crank arms are tight. Even if they don't seem loose it doesn't hurt to put a wrench on the fixing bolts and torque them a bit. (If one moves more than a small amount, get a torque wrench and do them up right.) Likewise with the ...


10

I have taken to wearing an ear cover routinely, regardless of the temperature. I like it because it pads the helmet and acts as a sweatband, but it also reduces the wind noise in my ears. You could try that.


9

I had this exact problem, and I found a variety of products that can solve this and reduce the wind noise significantly. Cat Ears, Wind Blox, and SlipStreamz being the ones I know of (no affiliation). These products attach to your helmet straps and force the wind around your ear, therefore reducing the wind noise. I've heard you can also put a twist in your ...


9

With most noise-diagnosing, my usual protocol is to test ride thoroughly, including on an uphill, as the first step, to try and get the most accurate impression possible of what the customer is experiencing. You kind of need to do that to know, or at least have a pretty good guess, that you've taken care of the issue at the end. A caveat here is for my own ...


9

The pedal bearings are failing in some way. This may range from a ball or race physically broken to a simple lack of grease. Depending on what kind of pedals you have you may be able to service or replace the bearings. The video linked at the end of this answer shows what's required to do so. It's possible but somewhat of a pain. You have to have the ...


8

buy cases of beer with the cardboard dividers between the bottles. You can then re-use the cardboard dividers in other cases of beer.


8

For your own safety I would recommend that you keep listening to music and riding as separate activities. However, if you must you could use bone conduction type headphones as these leave the ears open for traffic noise while allowing you to hear the music via bone conduction. You must ride very fast so that wind noise is a problem for you


8

Recently I've tried using bone-conduction earphones. They work surprisingly well. I can hear traffic and noises around me clearly because the "transducers" rest on your cheekbones, about two fingers in front of your ear holes. Its really weird because I can block my ears with fingers, and the music keeps playing mostly unchanged, but the ambient sound ...


8

It's hard to diagnose the problem remotely, though the suggestions in the comments are good things to try. Normally, I try to give "educational" answers that show people how to fix problems on their own, but I don't feel I have the expertise in this case, so I'm going to make the non-educational suggestion. Your bike is brand new, so you should take it ...


8

It's not the chain but rather new chain/old drivetrain combination. Depending on how worn your chainring/cassette are, the noise may be temporary or permanent. If cogs of your drivetrain are heavily worn, it means that links of the new chain will never lie precisely on them, causing invisible but noisy movements as the chain attempts to position itself on ...


7

This is a late answer I know, but I've found a solution to the rattling problem. I've had an Abus 6500 for nearly 3 years now and the rattling always annoyed me. I used to wrap a kind of nylon strap between the lock as I folded it and that partly solved it, although most of the rattle was coming from the joints themselves. It was only just today when I ...


7

Looks a little tight. There should be +/- 0.5 inch vertical movement of the chain possible halfway between the sprockets. Park tool has a great video on single speed chain replacement: (link starts the video at the tensioning segment.) Readjust tension and see if it makes a difference. Also make sure the wheel is parallel ...


7

My suspicion turns to the spokes. You've said they're a little loose, and one looser than the rest could easily make a noise only when there's weight on the bike, but with no need to pedal. A slight tighten of all the spokes on that wheel might sort it out, while keeping the wheel true. You may also be able to feel/hear a loose spoke by plucking, and confirm ...


7

Strangely, I have a Canyon and suffered the same creaking / clicking which developed after a couple of years of ownership. It would appear when putting power down on ie. Hills. In every examination - the noise appeared to come from the front - the chainset - and only under harder effort on hills. Firstly, you need to look at and consider the obvious. ...


6

Are you positive it's coming from the handlebar to stem interface? Creaking sounds are notoriously hard to diagnose. It's highly possible that the noise could be from the stem to steer tube interface or your headset or the spacers on your steer tube or topcap or another source, while it may sound like it's coming from your handlebars. Also, be cautious with ...


6

I suffered from terrible front brake squeal when wet. I'd tried cleaning the rotors and pads, I'd tried different organic and sintered pads, none of it made any difference. But finally I have solved it - by changing the rotor. The original rotor was the Avid one that came with the brake calipers (BB7s), which is pretty light and spidery. The replacement is a ...


6

It has consistently worked for me: Disassemble everything around the zone of noise suspicion, namely remove the handlebar from the stem and separate every bolt and washer away from each other; Clean them with light solvent or oil (the idea is not to degrease, but more to remove dust/rust/dirt and to allow a residual layer of lubrication to remain); Apply ...


6

The noise is coming from your handlebars, but in my experience noises can be deceptive. It may be your stem-handlebar interface, but it may not be isolated to that one spot. The first thing to check is that the tabs on the face plate are not meeting the body of the stem when everything is torqued down. If you can see a gap there, you should be ok. If they ...


6

You may want to read up on how to tune a rear derailluer, but if you just want to get going, all that is needed is a minor adjustment using the barrel screw (clearly seen in the video) where the cable comes in. Turn the screw clockwise 1/4 turn at a time, and the chain will move away from the cog (The cassette is the full set of cogs). Trick is not to make ...


6

Even though you mentioned in a comment that the high and low seemed to be adjusted properly, it still sounds to me like the 'L' limit of the rear derailleur is improperly set and does not allow the upper guide pulley to fully move the chain onto your largest cog. If this is indeed the case, shift into the largest cog and adjust the 'L' limit screw (the ...


6

The most likely scenario is that the freehub/cassette on your trainer do not line up exactly the same as they do on your normal wheel, and you need to make small tweak to your indexing. In your second video, it definitely sounds like it is trying to change gear.


6

Nope, it won't hurt anything. It's unlikely, but the worst case is that you might knock the cable crimp (the cap on the end of that cable) off eventually, which could then cause the cable to fray, which would then eventually need to be replaced. I would try to bend the cable so that it is tucked away behind a piece of the bike frame or the front derailleur ...


5

Heatshrink SOLVES this problem completely. Go to radioshack, buy the smallest about of heatshrink you can that'll fit, get a heat gun or a lighter or even a blowdrier in a pinch, and say goodbye to the rattling.


5

I noticed this as well. In my experience, on higher end road bikes, the cassette that you put on the freehub body makes the most audible difference, versus the actual inner-workings of the freehub itself in most cases, i.e. normal, ratchet style freehub body. Example: I went from a Sram PG-1130 cassette to a PG-1170 recently. The lower end cassette (...


5

A couple of things I see: I think your derailleur is a bit out of adjustment and is "leaning" towards the lower gears. It's grabbing on the ramps of the lower gear as it goes by. Your B screw adjustment is a bit too far away from the cassette. I would try to get it within a link or link and half. It looks from the video that you are about 2-3 links ...


5

First of all, welcome to the "mysterious click" society! The obvious first thing you want to check if this is pedal or not. Find a certain way to reproduce the click and reproduce it by pressing on the pedal, its furthest end, only. Then try to reproduce by pressing only crank by your foot using similar force (be careful, cranks are slippery!) and watch ...


5

I would suspect a problem in the bottom bracket, but would also check pedal spindles and bearings. Check for any movement or play between: - The pedals and crank arms - Crank arms and crank axle - Crank axle and the bottom bracket shell If there is movement between the crank arms and crank axle don't ride the bike. Alloy cranks moving on steel axles will ...


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