29

Most sources I've read suggest that your body can process at most 300 calories per hour during exercise. And a lot of sources suggest that you only attempt to replace roughly 200 calories per hour at best. You should be able to do this easily without any simple sugars. Your initial budget is much much larger than 1500 calories, you don't need to do a one for ...


17

Advice in book Racing Weight by Matt Fitzgerald goes something like this, paraphrased: Yes, training without carbohydrates will train your body to use stored fat better. But your capacity to train will go down (not enough fuel!), and net result will be less improvement. It references this study, which compares two groups of athletes on hi-carb and low-carb ...


16

Bonking occurs when your body cannot metabolise stored fat (and muscle protein) fast enough to replace the glycogen reserves, you deplete the reserves in your muscles and liver, and eventually you run out of glycogen. Fat conversion requires high levels of oxygen, and is slow, so once those reserves are gone, your blood sugar plummets. I suspect your body ...


16

If you go for a ride in the morning, your body's main source of energy is glycogen stored in your leg muscles, which came from the food you ate for dinner the night before. (There is also liver glycogen, and you can burn fat, but it's a slower process.) For most people, muscle glycogen is sufficient for about 2 hours of continuous, strenuous exercise. Once ...


14

This would be a great problem to have for most of us roadies. Simply eat more if you find yourself losing more weight than you care to lose. You can alternatively balance with more strength based exercises like lifts, pulls, rows at the gym or elsewhere. Or cake.


13

Glucose (dextrose is the same thing) has a special role in metabolism - as well as being a nutrient sugar in its own right it's a vital intermediate in breaking down more complex sugars, starch, and glycogen, our bodies' main store of carbs. This all means we're able to get energy from it very efficiently (excepting cases of diabetes). This is why energy ...


12

Very unlikely you were dehydrated from such a short ride. If you were dehydrated post ride, you almost certainly started out dehydrated. Humans evolved to the top of the food chain by drinking when thirsty, the advent of the '8 glasses a day, drink all the time' has been popularized in my lifetime (First references appear to be a 1945 FDA recommendation), ...


11

Some personal thoughts/opinions: If you're not riding much longer than an hour or so, you might not need much. Perhaps a sports/electrolyte drink that contains sugars will suffice and be convenient. I use mainly cheap gel bars for a sugar hit, but they get quite boring and eat away at your teeth. Flapjack, oats, etc are good for a bit of variety but perhaps ...


11

I like to carry PowerBars, because they taste sufficiently foul that I'm never tempted to eat them just because I'm bored or peckish. Which means they're there when I really need them. The expiry date printed on them seems to be imaginary, I've eaten them when the foil wrapper is intact but so worn that it's hard to make out what flavour the bar is supposed ...


10

I've ridden many sportives at this distance in the UK and here is my experience. Food/Drink Looking at the route map there are 3 food stops and 11 water stops so you don't need to carry loads with you. I'd say a 750ml bottle will do. If you find you drink a lot on your training rides then take a second bottle. Food will be available at the stops but you ...


10

You don't mention where you get your calories burn/hour rate, but 800 cal/hour is a very fast ride. 800 cal/hour would be around 220 watts, and that's a lot for 6 hours. When you are riding, some of your energy is coming from carbohydrate metabolism, and some is coming from fat metabolism. The ratio between the two depends upon how hard you are riding, your ...


10

In the past I was used to buy sport drinks - like Gatorade - spending a lot of money and always in doubt about their efficiency. But my sport Nutritionist suggested me a simple, natural and efficient recipe you can make at home for a tasty (and really cheap) sport drink: 500 ml water; 2 tablespoon sugar; 1 teaspoon salt; Juice from one orange; Just mix ...


10

I've almost done this, and its not "easy" but it should be possible. However a non-stop 100 km is much harder than simply doing 100 km. Try working up do it. I don't know what your current distance is for a "big ride" but start with 25 km non-stop, then work up to 50, 75, and then 100 km. Leave early in the morning on your big rides - it seems to help ...


9

I'm interested in how we can maximise restoring energy stores (mainly glycogen, but I'm deliberately being vague) either between closely spaced rides or on long rides. On a ride Here your ability to actually rebuild glycogen stores are compromised as your body is trying to fuel the activity not rebuild your stores. Exercise actually alters your physiology,...


8

Exercise is fuelled by a combination of carbohydrate and fat. In theory, if you exercise while your body is deprived of carbohydrate it will become better at utilising fat for energy. I know some running coaches advocate this approach for marathon training: Any carbohydrates ingested will be used by the body for fuel, and we don't want this. We want to ...


8

I don't think this is problematic. Those gels consist mainly of sugar which is a good preserving agent and are sealed air-tight which means they shoudn't get easily contaminated. So if none of the following conditions are fulfilled, I wouldn't mind using such a gel that is some months over their "best before" date: The sachet hull is intact, i.e. there are ...


8

General answer to: 'Do I have to be more aware of what I am eating or is it just fine for me to eat whatever I want...?' I'm pretty sure a doctor or nutritionist would tell you that you should eat a balanced diet, not one that is high in calories sugar and fat. I'm also sure a lot of people in this community will tell you that diet gets more important an you ...


8

I'll concentrate first on the carbs side, because the water depends on so many factors. Gels are around 30% non-sugar carbs with the rest water, according to the SIS ones I have here. They're actually a fairly heavy way to carry a small amount of carbs if you can get water along the way, but they're easy to consume while riding hard, and are meant to give ...


8

Lactose requires the enzyme lactase to be digested. According to the Wikipedia article on lactose, "in most mammals, the production of lactase gradually decreases with maturity due to a lack of continuing consumption." In other words, most adult mammals, including humans, no longer produce lactase and are therefore unable to digest lactose. In ...


7

it would seem to me that nutrition, hydration, waste disposal and arm fatigue would be the greatest challenges Nutrition: isn't that hard, although if you haven't already, you might want to spend some time figuring out what food works for you on the move. You want things that are fairly calorie-dense, probably not too much fibre (see point #3) and agree ...


7

This is most likely a mixture of fuelling and trying to do too much too soon. It sounds like you routinely eat a fairly low carb diet, which is not in itself a bad thing, but will mean that it's unlikely your glycogen stores are ever more than partially filled. This is not a problem at all during low intensity exercise, but when exercising at high ...


7

During a short ride you mostly fuel with pure sugars and as simple as possible - so mainly glucose in gels. For longer events you also want more complex sugars that take longer, but still mostly carbs - rice cakes, croissants, sandwiches, musli (granola) bars. You are correct that you cannot sustain a long ride (a road race) just from the glucose gels, you ...


6

Just keep at it. The human body is very adaptable and you'll soon get fitter. Don't worry too much about food and nutrition at the moment, that only matters when you're cycling at a competitive level, you just need to make sure you've had breakfast before you ride in the morning. Regardless of cycling/weight loss you should try and eat a healthy balanced ...


6

The short answer is that it is purely down to your individual training level and mechanical efficiency in each of these disciplines. Bonking is a result of fully depleting your glycogen stores. Once this occurs, your body's only source of fuel to power your exercise is to metabolise fat. This does not change regardless of what activity you are performing. ...


6

Great you are experimenting with these things. Food and energy input, along with hydration, is something any endurance rider needs to be on top of. Everyone is different and you can't know what works and doesn't until you tried it. However in its current form, this question would take an entire (large) book on sports nutrition to get to a full and useful ...


6

It's been a while since I researched this, so don't take it as gospel, but ... There are several stages in the sequence toward metabolic exhaustion: When you first start to exercise, the muscles (other than the heart muscles) burn "blood sugar" -- glucose. This provides instant energy, so it's always circulating (until the supply is exhausted). Blood ...


5

I am not sure you are after "The quickest Boost food" - seems the problem you have is likely to be over an extended period. If your problem is say "they leave me behind up big hills" then maybe a "boost" is what you are after, but if its just keeping up over the duration of the ride, quick boost food is not good. The problem with the likes of Jelly beans, ...


5

Two things that must be considered when looking at the average speeds of the Tour de France are strategy and racing dynamics before you look at the numbers. The main strategy objective for any of the teams in the Tour is to go only as fast as you must to achieve a given objective while doing the least amount of work possible. If teams could win the tour ...


5

The problem is burning too much carbs/glycogen and not enough fat, since you body has an essentially unlimited supply of the latter. How? One step is to eat more fat and less carbs. That trains your body to burn more fat. This article also suggests pushing your limits on how far you can go without eating, as a way to train your body to need less. Another ...


5

Clif Bars do a good job for this. I keep some in my bag for exactly that purpose.


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