12

Very unlikely you were dehydrated from such a short ride. If you were dehydrated post ride, you almost certainly started out dehydrated. Humans evolved to the top of the food chain by drinking when thirsty, the advent of the '8 glasses a day, drink all the time' has been popularized in my lifetime (First references appear to be a 1945 FDA recommendation), ...


7

During a short ride you mostly fuel with pure sugars and as simple as possible - so mainly glucose in gels. For longer events you also want more complex sugars that take longer, but still mostly carbs - rice cakes, croissants, sandwiches, musli (granola) bars. You are correct that you cannot sustain a long ride (a road race) just from the glucose gels, you ...


4

For what it’s worth: Energy gels are mostly glucose (sometimes a mix of glucose and maltodextrin). As far as I’m aware most professional athletes (my sister included) use such gels (or other glucose source) during competitions. However, even on hard rides you shouldn’t need food if the ride lasts less than an hour. For rides longer than an hour it really ...


4

I'm adding an answer, and note that it is still in progress. First, there is currently a global pandemic, and riders may be interested in doing long solo rides, or they may be interested in more lightly-supported rides. Gravel cycling has become much more prominent, and organized gravel rides typically have longer distances between stops than a road century. ...


4

AndyP is right - the scaling is far from linear with weight. Anyway your reading has a fairly large margin for error. But you can approximate your calorie burn by calculations (which is likely to be less inaccurate than a cyclocomputer if that doesn't take into account ascent, e.g. if solely wheel-driven). Even so the surface is important and is ignored by ...


4

No, calorie burn does not scale linearly and can vary based on a great many factors. Calorie consumption is very closely tied to power output. Power in watts x4 is usually considered a good estimate. If the entire ride was on a steep climb using tyres with virtually no rolling resistance, then in this case you would be correct. However on a real ride other ...


3

For what it's worth, I participated to an ultraskate 2 years ago. The principle is easy enough: push on a skateboard as far as you can in 24h. Skateboarding is less efficient than cycling, but I think the effort is comparable. You'd just go faster and further on a bicycle. My goal was to push at least 200 miles (~320km). It's not easy to eat 4000+ kcal while ...


3

One minor point may have been missed in the above answers. Long duration, high-intensity exercise burns a lot of energy, and you mainly get that from carbohydrates. The conceptual diagram below is taken from a discussion on Road Bike Rider.com, and it is from an academic article. The y-axis is calories per hour for a reference rider of unspecified weight. ...


3

I'll focus on this part of the question: After becoming dehydrated, would it be best to rehydrate with water, or use some special kind of energy drink? Normally, I don't recommend energy drinks simply to rehydrate. Most drinks with electrolytes do contain carbs, but in theory that's a separate issue (e.g. Nuun tablets contain electrolytes but minimal carbs)...


2

I often stop at gas station convenience stores when riding to just purchase a drink, finish it, and keep going on. Most places stateside those are open during corona shutdowns. In other years, the time-tested coffee shop or breweries.


1

Monitor urine color. (pee in an empty clear bottle) If darker than light apple juice, drink more water. Brown apple juice is too dark. I drink 2 to 3 ounces of water per mile. Maybe 0.5 to 1 ounces of Gatorade type drink per mile - on the high end on hot days. I sweat most of that out on 100 mile bike rides. I rarely stop to pee. I have tried almost ...


1

Now you're pre-warned with some of the symptoms and results, consider doing the same ride again and see how you go. Perhaps pace yourself a little better on the uphills, carry a full water bottle and sip from it periodically. Stick a banana, a sweet thing, or a gel in your pocket for just-in-case. Personally I feel ratty riding if I'm low on sleep/tired ...


1

I have a preference for squares of chocolate on a hard race. Trick is to break them up into squares, leave them in the freezer overnight, remember to take them in the morning. You can mash them against the ceiling of your mouth and still breathe perfectly well. Plain chocolate or goo-filled works nicely. I also find hard boiled lollies work as a sugar ...


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