26

IMHO, it's not the weight that is hurting you the most. While weight makes a difference and a lighter bike would be much better, it's too common in cycling world for people to use weight as a proxy quality and performance. Any twit with scales can measure it. That said, there is no doubt more suitable bike would make longer trips faster, and a better ...


21

If you have n bikes, n+1 bikes is the right amount of bikes to have. ;) Realistically, I think 2 or 3 is adequate - a cyclocross or non-racing road bike can do the first two tasks (road ride + commute) provided it has rack and fender mounts, and one mountain bike is likely good enough for the trails in one's area (if you go somewhere else where another ...


18

Aside from (n+1), the other honest answer is: as many as your spouse will tolerate, often written as (s-1). At the time I wrote this answer, I had six bikes (two road bikes, one mtb, two folders, one English cruiser). I had met the spousal tolerance factor. After this, I can only replace, not add. So if I really wanted that Brompton, one of the folders had ...


17

In german this is called "Hinterrad versetzen" -- "displacing the back wheel". I got to learn this in an mtb course I took a while back. If you can, try to find an instructor or other experienced rider to teach you. How to practice: Start very, very small and always wear full protective gear, i.e. a full-face helmet and vest in case you crash. You will ...


15

You should find that on those bikes everything is a bit stronger and heavier than a standard touring bike. Not only are they expected to carry more weight, they're designed to be ridden into places where failures are more difficult to recover from. As well, because they're designed to be ridden off road they'll usually have a lower top tube for better stand-...


14

Check out cyclocross style bicycle. It does well on the road and light trails. You can put touring tires on it. wiki Cyclo-cross


13

I won't give my own question the check. I have a few bikes and I see a bike I want and I am going through the can I justify to myself. How many is too much? If you don't have room to store them safely and sheltered then too many. If you are not going to maintain them then it is too many. You can't afford it. When do you need more than one bike? ...


12

I would recommend you wait for one reason Covid. In most parts of the world bikes are in limited supply. Prices even on used bikes are 50% to 75% higher than comparable bikes a year ago. I think you may wind up overpaying and settling. By settling I mean selecting a bike because it is available. Maybe not the best fit, or the correct type(road, gravel, ...


10

There's a whole sport - cyclocross - that involves riding road bikes off road. Typically the gearing is a little lower than a stock road bike, and these days a lot of them have disk brakes. Most will take fairly wide tyres, 38mm is not out of the question. For riding a stock road bike off road, I'd look mostly at tyres. If you can find some that will clear ...


9

It sounds like what you want is a gravel or adventure bike. There is not a distinct category, and different manufacturers use different names, but the basic attributes you are looking for are: Road bike style frame, ISO 622 rims, drop bars Clearance for up to about 40mm tires Disc, linear pull (V) or cantilever brakes Slacker steering geometry More relaxed ...


8

Carbon fiber road bikes are generally perfectly capable of being ridden on less than perfect surfaces without sustaining damage. Obviously you want to avoid large obstacles such as potholes, rocks, kerbs etc. 28mm tires are definitely a good idea. Depending on how much poor quality surface you plan to ride on, you might want to consider looking for a '...


8

The Linus Roadster is not the bike I'd choose for rural poor quality tarmac, gravel roads or packed dirt trails. The stock 32mm tires do give a bit more volume than standard road size tires to soak up bumps a little (they are about the the same size as cyclo-cross tires ) but they are slicks designed for paved roads. The main problems are the single speed ...


7

It's called an endo and you can start learning it anywhere right now (e.g in a parking lot). Don't try to learn turning endos or rolling endos at first. Here is a good how-to video (doesn't matter that it's on a bmx): Some advanced turning and rolling endos on a mountain bike can be seen at http://www.pinkbike.com/video/...


7

Gasoline was used for many years as an inexpensive readily available solvent. There are a couple of real life issues with using gasoline for a solvent. It is very flammable thus a fire hazard. It is absorbed through the skin and it is toxic when inhaled in high concentrations. You have to find a way of disposing of the remaining dirty solvent. Pouring it on ...


7

Yes, absolutely. The knobs will get rounded off at an accelerated rate, particularly down the center of the rear tire, and the tires won't offer as much traction off-road. This doesn't happen instantly, but it will happen soon enough on a knobby used for primarily road riding.


7

Generally, wide tires have lower rolling resistance than narrow ones, and they will be more comfortable due to cushioning. Hence, there's an argument you could go all the way up to a 45mm tire, the maximum I think your bike will clear. For performance-oriented road riders, aerodynamic considerations might come into play, but these are probably irrelevant ...


6

As a horse owner I can answer this from experience. If approaching the horse from behind it is important to slow down, as you approach the horse shout 'bike' or make some noise - bikes are very quiet and if you suddenly 'appear' in the horses line of vision and it didn't hear you approach you'll spook it. Pass wide and slow. If approaching from the front, ...


6

Using gasoline as a solvent won't harm your bearings. It may dissolve some plastic components though. The drawbacks of using gasoline are mainly due to its properties other than as a solvent: it's volatility, flammability, and that it is toxic, as it will harm your skin if exposed to it for long periods of time, and that it requires careful disposal. ...


6

BMX was originally (and still is) run on smooth dirt track that have obstacles such as jumps and whoops (also know as the rhythm sections). Because the tracks are smooth a small fully rigid bike works amazingly well when ridden appropriately. The BMX bike and track evolved together emphasizing a riding style that is about timing and body position. All of ...


6

Whether the cruiser style bike is suitable for the 'mountain bike trails' you are riding on really depends on exactly what those trails are like. The cruiser has pretty big tires so it should be able to handle rough surfaces just fine. If you are riding those trails and it feels OK, then it's OK. Cheap bikes from big-box stores with Shimano 'Tourney' level ...


6

28mm wide tires are perfectly suitable for riding hard-packed fine gravel trail surfaces. You do have to be more careful when braking and cornering than on tarmac as the top surface is loose. Larger rocks and potholes should be avoided of course. As the size of the gravel particles gets larger or the depth of the loose gravel top surface gets deeper the ...


5

It's no myth that decent 700s are hard to come by. I'm in Huaraz, Peru trying to find a wider tire for my Fargo to get off pavement. There are no Schwalbes to be found anywhere in this country. Mail order is unreliable as customs may or may NOT impose an incredibly high import tax. OR they might just not release a mail order for months. Geometry, cycle ...


5

Use a seatpost-mounted rear mudguard, like the SKS X-tra Dry: For the front, you can also use a downtube mudguard like the SKS X-board: These are convenient for bikes which don't have proper fender mounts/fenders would interfere with clearance/fenders need to be easily removed or not [Most mountain bikes fit this thing]. They don't protect the drivetrain ...


5

On sand you'll need wider tires that do not dig into sand as easily as well as some tread pattern to prevent sand grains from rolling under your tires. 23mm is too narrow. Measure the forks, if they are wide enough you can use cyclocross semislicks. I have seen an old Trek road bike with cyclocross tires used in a race, so it might be possible for your bike ...


5

The main problem I see with Gates Carbon Drive on a fat bike is that you have to have a frame that "breaks" in the rear triangle to accommodate threading the belt. Have you checked to make sure there's a frame available that supports fat bike tires and also supports breaking the chainstays. As far as off-roading goes, that would create a potential weak spot ...


5

In poor country, there is not "nice pave road" and "special cross country bicycle", cyclist just use their bicycle as daily utility tools and no complain. As long as you are not playing extreme (e.g. play the downhill) . If you are worry about comfort, punctured, then change to wider tyre, use puncture resistant tyre, good double wall wheel rims. All the ...


5

Gearing can be changed, though sometimes it's hard/expensive. Some adventure road bikes and almost all tourers have a much wider range of gears, but tend to be heavier than road bikes. The available width for tyres on a road bike can't be changed, and will limit your off-road use. Gravel is very variable; some is hard on road tyres while in other areas you ...


5

There's two distinct sides to this question: how does carbon fiber the material fare the way it's used in modern road bikes, and how do carbon road bikes with the features they almost all have fare. Carbon road bikes, as they actually exist for the most part, are excellent at being structurally strong against all the typical loads on a bike, but are ...


4

It's called a stoppie or a nose wheelie- in some regions I suppose they call it an endo as well, though where I'm from an endo is going over the bars in a crash. In terms of how to practice, arne's advice for protective gear is wise. I would also use caution if you use clipless pedals. They can help you lift the back of the bike off the ground, but if you ...


4

Put some reasonably durable 25c or 28c tyres on and you should be fine. Also think of gearing ... trails can get steeper than road and traction can degrade quite a bit, requiring shorter gear ratios.


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