25

IMHO, it's not the weight that is hurting you the most. While weight makes a difference and a lighter bike would be much better, it's too common in cycling world for people to use weight as a proxy quality and performance. Any twit with scales can measure it. That said, there is no doubt more suitable bike would make longer trips faster, and a better ...


23

For context, I ride in the North Shore of Vancouver, BC, Canada, which is an area famous for its steep and technically challenging trails. I'm comfortable riding black diamond-rated trails. Here's an example of one (not my video): Personally, I ride SPD. I've tried Crankbrothers for six months, but I didn't like the feel, and ...


20

While my initial attempt with lightly deflated tires was not a success (I could only bike 100 m before being exhausted) my second attempt went much better. Based on your helpful answers, comments and suggestions I deflated my rear tire to 1.5 bar, and my front tire to 2 bar and rode at the waterline without much problems at an average speed of 20 km/h. I was ...


12

I would recommend you wait for one reason Covid. In most parts of the world bikes are in limited supply. Prices even on used bikes are 50% to 75% higher than comparable bikes a year ago. I think you may wind up overpaying and settling. By settling I mean selecting a bike because it is available. Maybe not the best fit, or the correct type(road, gravel, ...


8

The Linus Roadster is not the bike I'd choose for rural poor quality tarmac, gravel roads or packed dirt trails. The stock 32mm tires do give a bit more volume than standard road size tires to soak up bumps a little (they are about the the same size as cyclo-cross tires ) but they are slicks designed for paved roads. The main problems are the single speed ...


8

Yes on hard sand it should be fine. The problem is what if it is not hard or there are patches of dust. At that point it will be a bit more tricky. The good part is you are on a bike and on sand. So if you fall it is not a big deal, and if you find yourself getting stuck you can walk sections. You may consider lowering your tire pressure too as that works ...


7

There are plenty of people who do both. Flat pedals are common, sometimes with added pins to give more traction on the foot. Cleats are common too, with a larger proportion preferring 2-bolt designs over the larger 3 bolt road-style of cleat (however I have ridden casual MTB with 3 bolt keo cleats cos its what I own) Some people like eggbeaters or frog ...


5

Great answers already. Just to add one more data point... I like riding clipped in (SPD) a lot, for all the reasons MaplePanda mentioned. This being Norway, it's another case in point that clips are well suited for really gnarly terrain!Perhaps surprisingly, I find the advantage to be biggest in the bike park, where pedalling isn't really required at all (...


5

This is much more at the casual end. I tend to fit SPDs when doing solo MTB rides, which tend to be quite a long way and mixed surface: some mild technical stuff, lots of gravel/dirt paths, too much mud and too much road. At the trail centres I'm more often in a group and prefer not to clip in (so swap pedals preemptively). I'm far from the most skilled ...


5

I haven’t seen the beach, or tried to cycle on one. I have at least cycled through numerous sandpits, a common obstacle in cyclocross races (and traditional CX tires are 32-34mm wide). I would guess that you mean the sand is somewhat compacted. You could certainly try it, but I would guess that the sand may not be compacted enough, and your tires might dig ...


5

Depends on the actual spec, but both bikes, as you've identified are fairly similar apart from the suspension. https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/atx-3 https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/escape-3 The drivetrain & brakes are almost the same, but the Escape is slightly more road oriented with 700x38mm tyres, whereas the other has 26 or 27.5" x about ...


4

Add 5-8kg to your bike*, go for a ride. Take it off, ride again. Expect the difference in buying a lighter bike to be at least as good. *Try to add mass uniformly, so as not to affect balance.


3

Beach races are quite standard, but there's a difference between soft and hard. There is nothing very complicated about bringing a vehicle over sand, and no strict cut-off point. However this is a very pure beach racing bike https://www.koga.com/en/bikes/race/collection-2018/beachracer.htm It's a 10kg racing/CX bike with discs and Schwalbe 62mm (2.35") ...


3

Aside from the frame and wheels, suspension quality will make a big difference in price and durability. You will save money skipping rear suspension and going with a hardtail or even non-suspension bike. Some strategies for saving money: 1) Buy used -- from a local dealer will cost a bit more but should mean the bike is in good mechanical shape. 2) Buy an ...


3

WHEELS In addition to frame, your wheels need consideration. Ideally look for bikes with wheels have a high spoke count. In modern terms, a rear might be 24-36 spokes, and a front is the same or slightly fewer. More spokes means a stronger wheel. I'd recommend 32 spokes as a minimum for the rear wheel and 36 or more if you can do so. The front wheel ...


3

I would be looking at bikes with frames made of steel. A cro-moly frame will be most likely to meet the requirements you are looking for on your budget, and there are a lot of bikes with cro-moly frames available in different price ranges. Companies like Trek and Diamond Back make high quality bikes in every price range, you would just have to look at how ...


3

I think the question of "worth" depends largely on what you plan to do after you achieve your 40-mile goal. Is that as far as you ever want to go, and all subsequent rides will be shorter? Or will you set a new goal of going farther, faster, and/or higher? It all depends on how serious you are about riding. 20kg is a really heavy bike, and you will ...


3

Unless the trails are quite rough, front suspension is probably making you work harder even there. They'd have to be properly technical MTB trails for rear suspension to speed you up. And on the road suspension is always going to hold you back (if you can lock it, it's only a weight penalty). Some slightly relevant tests I've done recently by riding the same ...


2

The damper and tyres are constantly draining on your energy, and the heavyness kills you uphill. Your bike is just murderous imo. ;) You only need this downhill stuff with big tyres and damped frame to go downhill on rough tracks, fast. I wouldn´t give a damn about my downhill speed, you have many miles on the road to catch up. Plus you can leave your ...


2

based on the 2020 linus roadster, you would be struggling. it has 32mm wide tires and you would want something at least wider than 45mm (1.75 in). even a crummy mountain bike would ride better off-road than the roadster.


1

Sand + Saltwater and unsealed bearings are not a good mix. Some things to consider depending on the value of your bike and cost for replacement parts are: Upgrading your bottom bracket to a sealed bearing. Sure there is some frictional loss there but even road cyclist use it on training bikes for bad weather riding Upgrade wheel bearings to sealed bearings/...


1

Performance of tires on sand mostly depends on tire pressure: The pressure in the tire is almost the same as the pressure that your tire applies to the sand. 32 millimeter tires are generally ridden with pressures around 5 to 6 bar, and that's likely too much for wet sand. Sand may be much stronger when its wet, but 6 kilograms per square centimeter are ...


1

In terms of making a ride of about 40 miles one big thing to consider is are you constantly pedaling at an "optimal" speed. From the below article an optimal cadence is 60-90rpm. This can be maintained even on hills by changing gears appropriately. A bike computer with a cadence sensor will help with keeping an even cadence. reference: https://blog....


1

If you are lacking energy, what you need is more energy. From reading the comments, you say you are doing 33.5 miles over a four hour period and not eating. Most people would want to eat something in that time if they were sitting on the sofa. You must eat. (I assume you are hydrating) Taking on something every 60-90 minutes should see you to your target ...


1

You'll probably want to upgrade to 4-pot brakes and larger rotors to give you more braking power and cooling ability. Tires with "downhill casings" might also be nice to avoid pinch flats and damaging the rims. Finally, make sure whatever fork you get (if hardtail) is rated for your weight. Air forks usually have pressure limits and coil forks only have so ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible