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101

In places where there are lots of bikes, most people who are riding them are making short journeys purely for transport. For a short ride of a few kilometers, it really doesn't matter what you're wearing. Any clothes that are comfortable to wear in general will be comfortable to wear on a bike for fifteen minutes. People who are riding longer distances, ...


72

Local here, have lived in Amsterdam for just over a year and a half, through the cold wet winter. I'm not a Dutchie, but have embraced the fiets lifestyle here. Let me just say that the jeans you get in Amsterdam are the same as what you would buy anywhere else. I ride in Levis 511 jeans every day and have no problems. People here more or less ride in all ...


25

You are surely aware that there is an industry out there that tries to sell you things you only marginally 'need' - special clothing for any sport is not unaffected by that. There is certainly a gain by wearing special cloth (and shoes) while biking, but unless you are seriously exercising or training for a competition, the difference is marginal. Of course,...


23

Jeans aren't as bad as you think. I think the biggest factors are short journeys, mild climate, and being used to it. With efficient infrastructure this can account for a lot of commuting. Apart from the efficient infrastructure that covers most bike commuting in the UK as well, and most people here don't get changed. I sometimes don't get the chance to ...


16

As someone who biked daily for transportation and recreation for years, I can tell you it doesn't take any miracle to do it in street clothes. David Richerby already mentioned that most practical bike trips are short. Mine were usually 10-20 minutes. But many times I've gone on recreational rides of 2-4 hours. And I've never owned any special "biking ...


14

Almost all road bikes have your torso leaning forward to some degree, meaning you have to hold your head up constantly. If you've never ridden a true road bike before, you've probably never had to do that. What's the longest ride you've done on a road bike before this two-hour ride? Since you didn't mention your hands or arms hurting, you're probably not ...


11

I've never been to Amsterdam, but I do remember reading a comment by someone from there once about what it was like. He said that people there tend to ride at a more leisurely pace, and everyone from all walks of life ride bikes. It's just ordinary people riding around to get to places. In contrast, in non-cycle-friendly cities, cyclists ride hard to keep ...


11

"Cyclist's Palsy" shouldn't happen at all. Find someone competent to help you fit your bike. My first suggestion is the nose of your saddle it too low causing you to lean forward and put pressure on your hands. Whatever the cause, you need to find it and fix it before you do permanent damage.


9

I switched bikes a year ago, and I noticed on my rides (50km - 70km) at the time that I had some numbness / cramp / pain in my hands and wrists, it was so bad on some rides that I need two hands to change gear. The bike had slightly different geometry than my previous road bike. I now ride frequently 100km and even up to 180km with little or no pain. Here'...


9

People tend to think of fit as something for which there is a single solution, i.e., a particular combination of frame size, seatpost height, stem length, and so forth, all of which will create the optimal size bike for them. In reality, it isn't that straightforward; proper fit can be achieved within a range of values. For example, I have a few different ...


8

As @Daniel has commented, and I agreed, you probably have a bike fit problem. We cannot be sure; the only way to find out for sure is to get a professional fitting done. Having said that there are still a few things you can try. While you say you try to adjust my hand positions, what positions do you use most? ... The Allez handlebar setup is one I ...


8

I will take the liberty to interpret the question slightly more broadly, on how bicycles are adapted for riding in ordinary clothes. Apart from raingear, I've never changed clothes for cycling in my life (not when I went on a 700 km bike tour either). Skirt guard / coat guard You don't really need fenders for cycling with jeans. All fenders do is stop ...


7

Regarding part 1: I'd start by raising the stack height a bit so that you lean on your wrists with less weight; your position will be more upright and less aerodynamic. Along with this, make sure your saddle is properly adjusted for height. More importantly you should try strengthening your abdominal muscles. With a stronger core you will be able to ...


7

The key point in your question is I get on the bike and ride hard. There's nothing wrong with riding hard, but it sounds like you're riding too hard for your knees to be happy. Since you like doing weights, I suspect that you like to push the pedals hard, and this is causing the problem. Bike fit issues can cause knee soreness, but they also tend to have ...


7

There are multiple possible causes for this kind of pain. Of course, you should see a medical person in case something more serious is going on than our amateur diagnosis suggests. In general, this is a kind of overuse injury. This can have different causes (and each would have slightly different symptoms). Part of the reason is that you've taken a break ...


7

Seems like you need a bike fitting for your wife. Depending on the length of her ride (probably 2-5 miles for people not used to longer riding), she may need to work up to riding the commuting length instead of just jumping to the full commute. I'd suggest checking the saddle angle (it may be too downward), raising the handlebars if possible (this may or ...


7

It's likely you can fix this by making the handlebars higher and possibly moving them back towards you. That means a new stem, which is probably something you can fit yourself. This is the part I'm talking about (photo from the manufacturer website). If you have a 5mm allen key you can remove that stem by undoing all four bolts you can see here, plus the ...


7

One simple rule of thumb stated before in this Q/A: If your knee hurts in front, your seat is too far forward. If your knee hurts in the back, your seat is to far backward. Remember that small changes of just a millimeter or two can make a big difference. So make small adjustments and try them out for a bit before adjusting again. While none of these are ...


6

You cannot draw any conclusions from one ride. Especially when your have ridden triple the distance of your previous longest ride. Anyone would expect some discomfort in that situation. Regarding recovery, it should have started during the ride. By this I mean you should have made sure you ate periodically and drank frequently. Some things that can help ...


6

There are so many factors involved that can lead to back pain that I would be suspicious of anyone providing the answer. Some factors that can affect Your current bike fit. Body angle: is your current fit very aggressive or more relaxed? Is you seat set back appropriate or too far back? Is your saddle height correct for your level of flexibility? Your ...


6

Thanks to @R.Chung I was able to do some research and figure out what my problem might be. This article, Climbing vs time-trialling: same effort, different power output, explains in great detail the differences in inertial load. To sum it up in relation to my problem: When on the road where the elevation changes often I use slow twitch muscles and exert ...


6

One of the more significant differences between a dutch city bike and a performance-focused road bike is the saddle. Saddles for transport tend to be larger and softer. That way not having padding isn't nearly as bad because the padding is built into the saddle. The chain is always protected by a guard to avoid loose pants getting caught in it and mangled....


6

As a Dutchman, there are some things I'd like to add to the previous (valid) answers. First, while it is true that our bikes are relatively comfortable and reduce wear and tear on clothes, this does not mean that uncomfort and/or wear are prevented completely. When I was a student in high school and university (ages 11 to 23) I used to cycle 120 kilometers ...


5

In addition to getting the right size shoes. Make sure the cleats are adjusted correctly. It sounds like you're getting something similar to "black toe" experienced by hikers and runners. It's usually caused by their toes getting jammed to the front of their shoes (imagine walking down a steep incline). If your cleats are too far back people tend to point ...


4

I went from 42cm to 40cm bars on a road bike and experienced the same symptoms. The switch to narrower bars can definitely cause tricep pain at the elbow. So, yes, tricep pain can be a symptom of narrow bars (it could be from other things too). Whether it is a temporary or a permanent symptom can be gleaned by how you feel after you've had some time to ...


4

Biking shorts could help but it's good to understand some things. First is that your coccyx shouldn't be touching the saddle or minimally if it does. A lot of people make the mistake of getting a cushy bike seat to alleviate such pain. The problem with squishy bike seats is that your sit bones sink down into the saddle and all the squishy stuff packs into ...


4

I know this is an old thread, and you've probably solved the problem by now. But that bike frame is too small for you.


4

Tendonitis (tendonosis) is one possibility, however I would expect some pain during riding especially during the beginning of your ride. When you say biceps tendon I assume you mean near your elbow. That said, the first things I would investigate are ulnar nerve irritation or compression at the cubital tunnel a/o the ligament of Struther's. The ulnar nerve ...


4

I get something similar from high-seat / low handlebars. It seems to be pressure and circulation / nerve related. The easy fix was to get some of these large surface area bike grips http://www.amazon.com/Ergon-Biokork-Bicycle-Handlebar-Grip/dp/B004P8FN28 Also- if you're wearing a backpack, this will add a bunch of extra force on your hands. So keep the ...


4

Perfect pedaling is actually on the rare side and generally takes a lot of work to develop. That being said many people pedal in an unbalanced way (I tend to have a much stronger downstroke on my right and upstroke on my left). I use clipless however, so my feet are always in the proper position (for me). If your foot position varies or isn't correct (for ...


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