20

Commercial paint jobs often use heat-baked enamel, with multiple coats (not just undercoat and topcoat), and finished with a clear top coat. The baking process produces a really tough, well bonded coating, and the clear topcoat (as well as being tough) produces a nice finish that hides scratches.


19

I used nail varnish, it sticks well to the plastic and is very tough. It's easier to apply than spray paint, but a bit more fiddly and forms a thicker layer of paint. I also used it to mark the locks. You get bottles in the most absurd colours in a 1-pound shop in the teenage cosmetics section.


15

I have extensive experience painting metal. Here are my rules of thumb. Rough up the metal, lots of nooks and crannies ensure the primer will stick. Sanding or sandblasting is the best way to do this. As pointed out in the comments, aluminium should be roughed up "nicely" :) Clean the surface with some type of alcohol after you're done sanding. After you'...


13

Since OP said the bike was Aluminum, we should note some things: Painting aluminum almost always goes wrong when done at home. Upon sanding, often sand particles are embedded in the aluminum (sand blasting likely doesn't help). Chemicals are the way to go for stripping aluminum frames. You need a different type of primer (etching primers specifically ...


11

Paint (and even nail varnish) will chip off the plastic sooner or later. The important thing is to get the paint into the grooves where it's protected. On my recent series 2 this means the logo on one side, the key number on the other. I've got an older series 2 with a slightly different key body, and the grooves on that aren't as deep (and in the case of ...


10

Using car wax on your frame could certainly help protect it over time, though storing it indoors is much more important so that all of the components are protected from the weather. There are bike specific products like Pedro's Bike Lust but if you don't want to go that direction you should be just fine with any auto wax. In the past I have heard of people ...


10

Here is the best-case scenario: the finish you applied is a single-component lacquer or enamel of some type which dries purely by evaporation of the solvents, not by a chemical reaction. No "hardener" was added to this when applying, and it's not a type which reacts with humidity or oxygen in order to further harden. Whereas, the factory finish underneath ...


9

This is not a complete answer, but one factor certainly is that nowadays bikes often use powder coating as their finish, rather than liquid paint. Powder coating has signifcant advantages over paint (more resilient coating, no risk of running, no solvents required), but the surface characteristics are different. In particular, the sparkle effect of metallic ...


9

I would put them on before the clear coat. That way the clear coat helps to protect the decals as well as the paint.


8

My trick is to find nail polish that roughly matches the finish. It's easy to apply, quick to dry, and will prevent rust and oxidation for quite a while. It's not a perfect finish match, but there are quite a lot of colors that come close. If you can't find an near-perfect match try mixing two or three colors. Just remember the basics; with few exceptions ...


6

Either find a touchup paint that closely matches (often bike shops have tons of surplus or can order one that matches), or clear coat it. Or use clear nail polish. Or don't worry about it ;) As long as you're not storing the bike outside in the elements, you will reach the fatigue life of a weld somewhere on the frame before scratches will rust ...


6

It depends on the type of adhesive. Sometimes it can be just pulled off. Sometimes the gentle heat of a hairdryer (not a heat gun) can weaken an adhesive and make it easier to remove. Or you can try the use of GooGone or similar adhesive thinner/solvent (try on an inconspicuous place first to make sure it won't damage the finish). Heat and solvent cover ...


6

So long as you cover the metal part of the key (i.e. the part that goes into the lock) with some tape (e.g. painter's tape), painting is easy. You may want to roughen up the surface of the plastic a bit with some sandpaper. Then, you could use spray paint (there are ones which are marked as specifically good for plastic -- some of the ones which aren't ...


6

Basically any paint that could be used on a car will work on a steel bike frame. The better the paint the more robust it will be. Two-part epoxy based paints or powder coating are probably your best bets, but require specialized equipment. I think there are epoxy paints that do not require curing in an oven but you still need a spray gun. You can probably ...


5

I did a cheap paint job once. I'm mechanically inclined, so for me it was not a problem to disassemble the bike. Used 1000 grit sand paper to remove the gloss (opening pore) from the paint and then washed the frame with kitchen soap. Let air dry without touching it too much. With clean hands, tape any piece I didn't wanted covered, because I didn't ...


5

After using this YouTube tip for removing paint from my car (paint rubbed on the bodywork from a parking scrape), I thought I'd try it on the bike I bought - and it worked a treat! I really believe WD40 is some kind of miracle substance. So there were splashes of about five different colour paints - black, green, bronze, blue and pink I think. No idea why, ...


5

Steel requires rust proofing. Just like on you car, there is a thin layer of primer under the top color. When scratched to the base metal, sanding and painting the affected area is necessary. Sand until the exposed metal is shiny. Depending on the spot, you can use a high grit paper, or wet sand paper with water. You might want to start with 200-300 grit ...


5

As mikes indicated, the chemicals in your top coat reactivated your primer coat, much like if you were to write something in sharpie, it is dry to the touch, but if you were to wipe alcohol over it it would smear. I use aerosol cans for a lot of different types of painting, and unfortunately drips are often impossible to remove without a lot of sanding or ...


5

It probably won't peel further (you can apply whatever paint you want around the edges if you want), but the issue is just cosmetic. My suggestion is just to ignore it and move on with life.


5

There's not really a generic answer as not all finishes will react the same way to a given chemical, especially over time with repeated application. WD-40 has a bunch of naptha, which generally speaking you want to keep away from paint you care about. It also leaves an oil coating behind that can attract dirt, which is ugly and potentially bad for the finish ...


5

Here are a few places you may want to consider Right chain stay where the chain knocks against it. Bottom of the down tube where rocks might get flung from your tires. Around the headtube, check if there's any place where the gear and brake cables contact the frame when turning the bars. Rubbing cable mat seem insignificant but can easily wear away paint ...


5

Car paints will work fine, and car primers. There is one brand of paint that comes in rattle-cans and is specifically marketed for repainting bikes. You could get a powdercoating shop to lay down a base coat--that would probably be inexpensive, and give you a durable protective layer under whatever paint you applied.


4

John Allen has a page on refinishing a bicycle on Sheldon Brown's website. You need some covering on the frame to protect it, though. For aluminum, it is recommended to use chemicals and not sandpaper (due to particle embedding), but for steel, sandblasting is fine. The main issue with chemicals is fumes. There are also several related threads on bicycles....


4

It looks like its a steel (CrMo) frame (see if it says this on it somewhere). This is a good resource for repainting the bike. If you don't sand and rough up the old surface, the paint will likely not stick (a primer helps the paint stick as well). Spraying the crankset is a bad idea - you may get paint in the bottom bracket, or on the chainrings. If ...


4

I don't think it's possible to tell from the picture, but if it's a decal, you should be able to tell as it would probably be slightly raised from the surface of the rest of the frame. If you want a decal of similar style, contact a print or advertising company in your area (or find one online), many of them are able to make custom decals. My highschool ...


4

If you spray painted directly onto the original finish and that paint has stayed in place for 5 years, it's not coming off without removing at least most of the original paint. Even if the two paints used different bases (say one oil and the other latex) they are bonded together so well that they will not come apart. Your best option is to strip all the ...


4

My road bike is aluminium and I got a couple of scratches from a car rack too. Fortunately, rust is not a significant problem. Your options are Leave it, and admire the battle scars. Hide it with decals or accessories or tape. Gently spot-sand and then use some nail polish or similar to hide the damage. Generally takes two applications, sometimes more, ...


4

If you really want to paint it, you can try to wetsand it to remove the clear coat, and then refinish it with some matt finish clear coat. This is a risky move if you're not experienced with painting cars or stuff. You can ruin your bike real quick. The safe method, and easiest one, would be to wrap the bike with some matt/satin finish clear vinyl (here is ...


4

I've had many sets of painted rims. All of them were painted by a professional whose day job was cars. I have no idea what the prep and such involved was, but all of them looked great until I cracked the rims, had large rocks take chunks out, whichever. Paint is certainly not going to hurt your metal rim, and it may offer it some protection. Whether or ...


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