29

The top pair should attach to a rack on the front fork legs. The middle pair is for the rear, and the slope on the backing plate is to provide heel clearance. The fifth bag looks like it should mount to the front of the handlebars.


25

In general panniers are more comfortable and efficient than carrying weight on your body. There are some things to be aware of, however. Safety. Every time you set off, make absolutely sure that all the pannier straps are done up. Apart from things falling out, the last thing you want is a loose strap getting caught in the spokes. This can wreak a wheel, ...


20

I avoid backpacks where possible 1) Sweat - I get damp enough wearing just a cycling top. Putting anything else on top makes it much worse. 2) Crashing - Occasionally I have carried a toolbox in a tramping pack. One of the worries is "what happens if I end up rolling on this?" 3) Visibility - can be off-set with reflective tape or an overbag/wrapper/...


12

I know it sounds too simple, but these bags are made to be cleaned (assuming yours is unlined. If it's lined, you'll never get it out). First, try dish soap and water. Citrus scents seem to cut the smell best, but that may be a personal preference. If that is not enough, then the next best option is to use a diluted solution of something like Pine Sol or ...


12

I just used a 5mm bolt with locking nut, and a ~15mm wide washer on the inside when this happened to my Ortleib. If you use stainless steel bolt, nut and washers it won't rust and the pressure against the pannier materials stops it leaking. I'd use the biggest washer you can find on the inside, but the biggest I could find was only 15mm. If you look at the ...


12

Weight on the bike is easier to manage than weight on your body. The bike will handle a bit differently, but you'll quickly get used to it. If all you use the bike for is commuting, you should get the rack. Like you, I commute with a backpack, but I wouldn't consider a rack because I also regularly use my bike for recreational purposes.


10

You have a few options here. You can get a two-legged kickstand. These are primarily used with heavy touring loads, but they will help stabilize the bike when parking with an uneven load. The two legs fold up into each other when you disengage the kickstand. You generally cut these with a hacksaw to shorten them to the appropriate length. I used one for a ...


9

'Bulk' is mostly about whether all of your luggage will fit in your bags. ie is the volume of your luggage less than the capacity of your bags. So it depends on how much stuff you want to take, and how big your panniers are. Aerodynamics doesn't really matter for touring. Unless you are cycling rather fast, or it is very windy. Usually the weight of your ...


8

Yes. I own a north st bags convertible pannier and think it works great. It hangs a bit low, so don't try and use it on low rider racks. http://northstbags.com/products/woodward Also see Richard Jones Convertible Backpack http://www.convertiblebackpacks.us/ Also try WOHO bags "NINJA NINJA" convertible backpack: http://www.wohobike.com/product.php?...


8

I would recommend getting a second bike for commuting. The Specialized Roubaix is a racing machine. It would also be foolish to leave it locked outside a shop (in case you considered doing that). Most likely you will void the warranty by using clamps on seat stays. To get that low weight, carbon frames are strong only in certain directions and may be ...


8

The safest way to carry luggage on a carbon frame is to use a trailer, like the BOB trailers. Carbon frames are very strong, but each area of the frame is designed and tested for the loads it expects from a given direction. Adding luggage to a frame not designed for it, i.e. Without braze-one or threaded mounts, is generally a bad idea.


8

If its under the Ortlieb five year warrantee or you want it professionally done, send it back to them: https://www.ortlieb.com/en/service/garantie/ Locally, a local mountain shop, seamstress/tailor, sailmaker, upholstery shop, or shoe repair shop (tip of the hat to Daniel Hicks and dlu for the additions) might be able to do it for you. Whoever does the ...


7

You should look into getting a folding double kickstand. They're great for loaded bikes. Both legs fold off to the left side, but when you kick it down one leg supports each side so the bike stays perfectly upright.


7

I commuted for years carrying just one pannier. In fact, I have a pair of mismatched panniers because I wore out one of each original pair. If you just have clothes and incidentals in the bag, one pannier is certainly sufficient -- you will barely notice the slight off-balance. Definitely worry about heel spacing. Figure out how to get the bags as far ...


7

I wasn't aware of a rule for this, but I would hang a single pannier on left because it's the non-drive side of the bike. I doubt it matters though. When I was buying a new rear wheel a few months back, I found the spoke patterns in some rear wheels are different on one side to the other, so I don't know if this would make a difference. (I'd have added ...


7

Yes, it's common. Many low rider racks come with oversize U bolts specifically for this purpose, and the better ones bolt on to the brake posts like the Old Man Mountain rack shown below. If you're really lucky your suspension fork will have mounts for standard low-rider racks already (that's very rare though). There are a few caveats. First, try to put ...


7

I use two different strategies for the short and long absences. visiting a city by foot When I'll be away from the bike for a long time I take the valuable stuff (cash, id, small tool kit, phone, charger, camera) and leave everything else. If I'm in a formal camping area or in a secluded location I'll leave the tent pitched and my sleeping bag and ...


7

Weight on your body takes additional energy to carry, but it's also easier to move dynamically (it moves with your body and doesn't change the feel of the bike). I have always used and preferred backpacks for commuting. In addition to being more dynamic, it's easier to deal with once you get to your destination. You simply get off your bike and walk away. ...


7

They exist, but they're hard to find in real life, probably because the market is small. All the ones I've looked into would take a large laptop, but I've only tested with little netbooks. There's at least one fairly recent review online. I'm in a similar position: sometimes I need to walk or even run with my pannier (also I switch between bikes daily). I ...


6

I've personally never seen or heard of a waterproof spray that will protect against soaking. Water hitting the material might run off fairly well, but a continuous rain soaks it so much that water will just seep through. That might not be a problem for commuting, but I'm assuming that if you're going through the extra step of double water-proofing, you're ...


6

I've been commuting by bicycle even since I learnt to ride as a kid, and I've never commuted in any other way. I'd like to add one aspect that nobody has mentioned yet: be wary of theft. If you stand at a traffic light in a busy city, and have a visible laptop-bag in a pannier at the rear, it can be all-to-easy for someone to grab it and ride away with it....


6

That particular bike looks like it has mounting points for a rear rack, which is the primary issue. In general, what you are looking for are the bolt holes or "braze-ons" usually just a few inches below where the seat stays connect to the seat tube, as well as ones above the rear axle on the dropout. If your bike doesn't have them, there are ways to mount a ...


6

I'm primarily a daytime rider; if I'm riding with two panniers I mount the one on the left first because that is the side with my kickstand, and putting weight on the left (kickstand) side of the bike is more stable for me than the right hand side. If I'm riding with a single pannier I generally mount it on the left for most bicycles. It is: more stable ...


6

Starting this year I have been front loading two panniers on my commuter, with a reasonably large load (laptop, papers and project books, clothing (work and change) and food). For what I have learned is that there isn't a single answer to how large you can go and depends on a number of factors: Q1: Pannier Size I actually run rear panniers (and/or a ...


6

I'm Dutch, thus when I went to high school I had to commute for about 20 km/1 hour for a single trip. Since it was high school and some days I really had a large and heavy pack. Carrying it alone in the halls of school was heavy, let alone biking with it. Most of us used a specific brand (Kipling) bag, and we mounted the bag on our bicycle with a support ...


6

I think you are correct that it’s only to prevent items from sliding forward and falling off or colliding with your legs/hips. This is only really important if you use the spring loaded clamp. A lot of racks (I think all of them without the spring loaded clamp) don’t have this “nose”. Since there is still another horizontal bar right below it I don’t think ...


6

The traditional solution on bicycles is metal wire basket. Metal is tougher than plastic and mesh instead of sheet metal makes it lightweight enough. If you need something waterproof, put your things in waterproof bag or get a more expensive bike-specific rack box.


5

If you want to carry a full-sized hiking backpack, your best option might be securing it into a BOB-type trailer. A big backpack would be hard to mount to one side of a bicycling without doing terrible things to weight distribution. I have a 25L Timbuk2 Especial Viaje backpack/pannier for commuting, and it works well for that but is already pretty heavy on ...


5

I doubt you will find any way of making the bike secure enough to leave alone for hours on end. Perhaps you could somehow fit solid motorbike panniers, but they would be awfully heavy and inconvenient when you do have to remove them. When buying groceries you basically have the choice of taking the bags with you or leaving them on the bike. What I do ...


5

After some thought, your only options are 1) Backpack - hot and sweaty, not particularly large and affects your posture. I've ridden with a tramping (hiking) pack to move my toolkit about, and its not ideal. A smaller day pack would work better, or even a hydration pack if your load is smallish. Some people like sling-style messenger bags. 2) A fanny ...


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