11

You don't say what other uses you have for the garage, but lets presume the floor space is a premium, otherwise a row of bikes racks is the obvious, cheap and best solution. 7 bikes will fit into 5 meters, and stick out about 2 leaving plenty of space . But you have 3.5 meters high, use it.... Rope pulley from the roof for as many bikes as you need to free ...


9

My guess is that these are meant to hold bikes at the handlebar: From the side currently facing the wall you would hang your bike with the handlebar over the two hooks, such that the front wheel is lifted off the ground. This could be intended as an alternative solution for bikes whose tyres are too wide or too narrow for the other side of the rack. Of ...


7

Those don't look that great. Students would need a long cable lock in order to lock their bikes. There's no way that they could do it with a U-lock. And the weight of the bike is resting on the spokes, which is not good for them. Also, I'm not sure what level of school you're talking about, but I imagine an elementary school child might have a hard time ...


6

The solution in my particular case turns out to be that the 2" Marathons are actually no wider than the 1.9" knobblies - when fitted on my wheels and at my current inflation pressure of about 3 bar, at least - so the bike still fits in the rack. This won't help anyone whose tyres actually are too wide to fit in a narrow bike rack, but it may help someone ...


5

Depends a lot on the situation. At urban public (ie, tax-supported) schools in the US one would generally want something quite rugged and able to stand up to abuse, and also something securely anchored. Quite often you see simple inverted U shapes of heavy pipe with the bottom ends set in concrete, with multiple copies spaced 1/2 to 3/4 meters apart -- the ...


4

These stands don't hold the bike very well because if the friction grip fails, the bike can roll/move backwards and then fall over as the steering turns. So, consider backing your bike into one instead of going in frontwards. Downside as ChrisH says is that your lock needs to go from the rack all the way to the front wheel, or use two locks. Also check ...


3

You can either put the back wheel outside the rails and use your lock or a velcro strap to hold it in place. If someone has a real need, consider using a jack or two crowbars to spread the rails of one parking space and leave that one for those with wide tyres. They can still be used by narrow wheels too.


3

If you want to keep all the bikes on the floor, you can get wooden pallets, cut them in half and attached the one half perpendicular to the other one. Make sure to align the slits so the tires will fit.


3

I use simple metal hooks insted of expensive constructions. I agree, that the best will be to leave yours three bicycles on the floor, placing them into low front-wheel grips for instance. But be sure that kids will be carefull with bikes placed there, because that construction do not give enough stability, so that bicycles may fall over and be damaged or ...


3

If your current tyres are knobbly right out to the shoulders and your new ones much smoother you might get away with it. But you won't know until you try it by which point you've bought at least one tyre. Other options: an equivalent tyre from a different brand may be available in a 1.9 or even 1.95 fit a 1. 75 on one wheel and a 2 on the other; slot in ...


3

If your bike is like those pictured then it's highly unlikely unless the wheel gets hit or leant on from the side. That in itself is not implausible in a crowded bike rack. Lightweight road bike wheels are another matter, they have much less lateral strength. Even they would need some sort of sideways force but much less. The big problem with these racks ...


2

We had those parking stands at my old workplace. They suck: They make it impossible to lock both the frame and a wheel with U-locks. Fat wheels don't fit. If they do fit, if someone or something (like a strong wind) pushes on your bike, it'll easily taco your wheel. You should petition for better bike stands that are more secure. In lieu of that, you ...


2

I have been designing and installing bicycle parking facilities for more than 10 years. The owner of the rack has a duty of care to supply a bike rack fit for purpose - that a rider can lock their bike to the rack and the bike will be secure. 'Secure' is open to interpretation. My interpretation is that a lock should not be able to be removed from a bike ...


2

I painted my mudguards bright red to aid visibility, but it doesn't actually help that much. The thing that worked best for me was attaching a small pink teddy to the back of the pannier rack (like truckers do to their radiators). It's eye-catching even in a crowd. It's less good at Cambridge station, which is an extreme case, but works well in a long row of ...


2

I cannot comment but here is an idea: did you ask your workplace to install a more versatile bikerack? I know it is far fetched but sometimes people surprise your if you ask nicely.


2

Unicycle racks, of course. You would hang the unicycle by its seat on the rear hooks. This way both unicycle and bicycle users could coexist. Every university bike stand should have these.


1

Possibilities that occurred to me: Coat rack? The plastic host is redundant. Frame hooks? You might get a single bike hung over two/four hooks. Saddle hook? Given the height of the loop, it could be intended the whole bike hangs from its saddle from these hooks. Here's what I meant by saddle hook:


1

Try to use the end position of the rack, your wheel outside the rack and your bike on its own stand, idealy leaning over the rack. I have to do this with my own bike often, as my mudguard is getting damaged with a lot of the standard bike racks. In some cases I can also do it in the middle of a rack, but only if just every other space is used. (As so often ...


1

I have a similar rack at home and I find that putting the back wheel in is better (even with derailleur gears the rear wheel is usually stronger), and makes the bike much easier to lock. IME the most likely time for your bike to get damaged is when someone else is inserting or removing a bike, when they bump your bike and it rolls slightly out of the rack ...


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