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52

Whether it's rude is a matter of local custom. Whether you're offended by it depends on your flexibility and sensitivity Often, we cyclists can become a little over sensitive, after having to defend ourselves from car doors, pedestrians, cars, trucks, laws that don't take us into account, police who have a ticket quota, and even other cyclists. Relax. The ...


15

In the context described, I believe that bike docks are specific to bikeshare systems. They lock the bicycle in place, and the locking mechanism is integrated into the docks. Each bikeshare system tends to have one main model of bicycle and the docks are specific to that model. Some bikeshare systems are moving to a dockless format, where you would park the ...


14

I'd pick a different spot in the rack if possible. But if I was in a hurry or there wasn't another suitable place I'd use it (e.g. my bike doesn't fit on the bottom of the double stacker at the station; some places have decent racks and others that don't allow proper locking for all day use). I would try to make sure it's easy to get the lock off, perhaps by ...


11

You don't say what other uses you have for the garage, but lets presume the floor space is a premium, otherwise a row of bikes racks is the obvious, cheap and best solution. 7 bikes will fit into 5 meters, and stick out about 2 leaving plenty of space . But you have 3.5 meters high, use it.... Rope pulley from the roof for as many bikes as you need to free ...


10

I think that picking up a second bike is definitely a good approach. Not only does it allow you to not risk your more expensive bike getting stolen, but it allows you to have a bike more suitable to commuting. You can put fenders and racks on your commuting bike. Perhaps wider tires if you want something a little more comfortable. Since you are good with ...


9

My guess is that these are meant to hold bikes at the handlebar: From the side currently facing the wall you would hang your bike with the handlebar over the two hooks, such that the front wheel is lifted off the ground. This could be intended as an alternative solution for bikes whose tyres are too wide or too narrow for the other side of the rack. Of ...


9

This will depend on MANY things, including but not limited to: local custom office politics special concerns (I can't think of any, but more in this later) utilization of the rack your feelings on the matter type of lock Local custom is important. In some areas it's horridly rude; in others it's common. Does the parking complex for cars have assigned spots?...


7

The solution in my particular case turns out to be that the 2" Marathons are actually no wider than the 1.9" knobblies - when fitted on my wheels and at my current inflation pressure of about 3 bar, at least - so the bike still fits in the rack. This won't help anyone whose tyres actually are too wide to fit in a narrow bike rack, but it may help someone ...


7

Try a Garden Centre, they usually sell a range of trays and they should have something suitable. An example would be this "Giant Plus Garden Tray" which at 120cm x 55cm should be big enough to place a bike on.


5

You have various options, mostly depending on your local regulation, facilities and length of your parking time: Bike lockers Bike stalls Trees, poles or rails (ironically in the picture the bike is locked to a signal pole telling that bikes parked outside the allowed spaces will be removed) Bike parking spaces Building facade Car parking space The ...


5

You're unlikely to get the derailleur outside the rack with much clearance, so the chances of knocking it getting the bike out again are quite high. It may even be possible for someone to bump the back wheel and bend your derailleur. Selecting a bigger sprocket also puts the derailleur further forward. This is likely to improve the clearance around it but ...


5

You would have to ask the person using the term "dock" to know for sure what they mean when they use the term "dock". That said… Based on the examples you've given, and consistent with the plain-English usage of the word "dock", it seems that they are using the word "dock" to describe a specific location, as part of a ...


4

I use a few cardboard boxes taped together with gaffer's tape. The tape is waterproof. 2 layers of cardboard (staggered at edges if you're using small boxes) is plenty to make it through a season. Use the box edges up against a wall to prevent splatter. If you have uneven floors and the water rolls off of the boxes, fold an edge over to cause it to be ...


4

I guess it partly depends on the wheel/bicycle. Smaller, sturdier wheels (e.g. 26"/559mm MTBs) should be more resistant. With road bikes I’ve observed that they often lean on the spokes. This is especially bad if you have a low spoke count and therefore a high spoke tension which makes the spokes even less suited for lateral loads. I think it can definitely ...


4

if you can: carry it with you. When I was riding my brompton to school, I'd just fold it and take it into buildings and classrooms with me. There were some building guards that didn't like bicycles, so a small fabric bag/cover was used to disguise it. The brompton is unique in being small enough to tuck in just about anywhere, even under a conference table. ...


4

Rack can be several different things in cycling A place to slot a wheel on your bike, for parking The rack over the front/back wheel for carrying parcels/bags/panniers A structure on the rear of a car for carrying a bike while driving Dock is only used as a place to store and secure a bike. One difference is that a rack is inanimate, normally metal. A ...


4

Bike rack is a very common term used for a place people can leave their bikes. I would consider this pretty generic and that it could be used for many things. A person could be fussy and claim that only this or that type is a rack and these ones should be called bike stands and those ones should be called bike docks but since there are no rules for this ...


3

If you're going to lock it to something, either lock it to something that's "yours" (e.g. in the sense of your desk, which really belongs to your employer) or lock it to a bike rack (presumably). If you're going to bring it into the building, treat it as you would a dirty wet suitcase -- keep it with you and be careful to avoid getting other people's stuff ...


3

If you want to keep all the bikes on the floor, you can get wooden pallets, cut them in half and attached the one half perpendicular to the other one. Make sure to align the slits so the tires will fit.


3

I use simple metal hooks insted of expensive constructions. I agree, that the best will be to leave yours three bicycles on the floor, placing them into low front-wheel grips for instance. But be sure that kids will be carefull with bikes placed there, because that construction do not give enough stability, so that bicycles may fall over and be damaged or ...


3

You can either put the back wheel outside the rails and use your lock or a velcro strap to hold it in place. If someone has a real need, consider using a jack or two crowbars to spread the rails of one parking space and leave that one for those with wide tyres. They can still be used by narrow wheels too.


3

Does the lock make it harder for another person to use that space? If so leaving the lock is rude. If not then it is not rude. If parking your own bike in that space makes it harder for the lock owner to get their lock off so they can use it in another space, that's really for the lock owner to have to deal with and nobody else. Probably the small ...


3

If your current tyres are knobbly right out to the shoulders and your new ones much smoother you might get away with it. But you won't know until you try it by which point you've bought at least one tyre. Other options: an equivalent tyre from a different brand may be available in a 1.9 or even 1.95 fit a 1. 75 on one wheel and a 2 on the other; slot in ...


2

I have been designing and installing bicycle parking facilities for more than 10 years. The owner of the rack has a duty of care to supply a bike rack fit for purpose - that a rider can lock their bike to the rack and the bike will be secure. 'Secure' is open to interpretation. My interpretation is that a lock should not be able to be removed from a bike ...


2

I painted my mudguards bright red to aid visibility, but it doesn't actually help that much. The thing that worked best for me was attaching a small pink teddy to the back of the pannier rack (like truckers do to their radiators). It's eye-catching even in a crowd. It's less good at Cambridge station, which is an extreme case, but works well in a long row of ...


2

On the cheaper side, a tarp or a vinyl tablecloth should do the trick, and be more easily tidied away and stored. Even a decent-weight shower curtain!


2

I cannot comment but here is an idea: did you ask your workplace to install a more versatile bikerack? I know it is far fetched but sometimes people surprise your if you ask nicely.


2

The polite thing for the lock owner to do would be to "store" the lock in a place in the rack (eg; at the base) where it's not in anyone's way. If it's stored in an inobtrusive place or manner,then I'm ok with it. Otherwise, if it's in a prime spot, it is an unauthorized reservation of that spot. I often encounter this in a crowded bike rack, and I find ...


2

Unicycle racks, of course. You would hang the unicycle by its seat on the rear hooks. This way both unicycle and bicycle users could coexist. Every university bike stand should have these.


2

A secure bike rack is my first choice. Many business offer them. I avoid cheap racks that are not as strong as my lock. If there is a parking garage there will often be a bike rack in the garage. Not all places want you to lock out front. One of the sports arenas in my town will have the police impound the bicycle if you lock in front of the ...


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