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42

The Pedaling Technique of Elite Endurance Cyclists: Changes With Increasing Workload at Constant Cadence was published in the International Journal of Sport Biometrics 7:29-53, 1991. However, it seems to come to the conclusion that they don't really make any difference as far as pedaling efficiency goes. "...while torque during the upstroke did reduce the ...


39

No Since that's way too short for an answer, lets look at some maths. An average car might weigh Compact car 1,354 kilograms (2,979 pounds) Midsize car 1,590 kilograms (3,497 pounds) Large car 1,985 kilograms (4,366 pounds) Info from http://cars.lovetoknow.com/List_of_Car_Weights Lets say you start with one of the lighter cars, a Daihatsu Charade ...


35

Sheldon goes into some detail on this. Having the pedals 180° out of sync would lead to a couple of problems: Starting off, as most people have one foot on the pedal and lean towards the other foot on the ground, including both people on a tandem. Foot overlap. There's often not enough room for the captain's foot to be at the back of the stroke and ...


29

Higher-end bikes are expected to be used with clipless pedals. However, there are several different standards for these pedals, and all of which have a different type of cleat that fits in them. Most cyclists tend to stick with one of these standards across all of their bikes, so they don't have to have multiple sets of shoes. Thus higher-end bicycles ...


26

First up, I'd strongly recommend switching to clipless pedals. I had the same discomfort issues you're describing with normal shoes and toeclips and find clipless pedal so much more comfortable and secure (therefore safer). When comparing and evaluating clipless pedal systems, some of the more important attributes are: Float - This is the property where ...


25

Terminology is important here. Pedal Clips (refer here) are straps that tighten around the shoe. Clipless, such as SPD have a cleat - refer here Toe clips are not common these days - but still used by some (touring and fixed hub bikes) more niche applications. I assume you are talking about SPD style clipless pedals, but the following discussion does not ...


23

When you fit toe clips to your pedals, that spike is there to help you flip the pedal over so the clip is on the top. The pedals have an up and down orientation when toeclips are fitted.


22

You could probably add training wheels, but not a crank. There simply isn't anywhere on the frame for cranks to go. Also, adding training wheels to a balance bike is kind of defeating the purpose of a balance bike. It's meant to be an alternative to training wheels that allows the child to learn to steer into falls and "scoot" around and eventually learn ...


22

Quick release pedals as you describe do exist. They are often marketed in Japan as "Rinko" pedals as they were developed to as part of the Japanese tradition taking apart full size bikes for transport on trains: Currently, MKS makes these pedals (if you do an internet search for "MKS Rinko" you can find a distributor), they branded them with the "EZY" ...


21

The reverse threading is to counter precession, not friction from the bearings. The wiki page explains it well (and I doubt I could): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precession_(mechanical)


21

Clipless pedals hold your feet more securely and release easier than toe-straps and clips. As you are probably aware, it is possible to to tighten straps to the point where they must be released before the foot can be removed from the pedal. A properly functioning clipless pedal will always release the riders foot.


19

First let's clarify the difference between "clipless" and "clip" pedals. They are confusing terms as both have clips. Clip pedals (which I prefer to call cages) look like this: Cages have the advantage that they can be used with normal shoes. To get your foot into them you push it in from the rear and (optionally) reach down and tighten the strap. In my ...


19

Once loose, the pedal spindle will describe a cone as the crank rotates. This concentrates force at certain points in the crank threads, leading to damage. Top image shows the pedal spindle in the threaded hole in the crank. The threads are fully engaged and tightened, and forces are distributed. Note there is space between the male and female threads (...


18

You have to use an allen/hex wrench, that's why they have the hex hole in the axle. Going from the opposite side through the frame is easiest.


18

Yes, I've used a variety of folding pedals on my Dahon and Brompton and they're all a bit flexy. I've had plastic ones snap in half on me (and yes, that can be very painful/dangerous). The best ones I've had were all-metal ones in which the axle and folding pedal were both metal. But even those aren't as strong as fixed pedals -- and none of the folding ...


18

There does seem to be an upside down U-curve of spinniness on pedals with the horizontal axis being price and the vertical axle being how many rotations it makes when spun by hand. Cheap pedals are genuinely horrible. They just have a sleeve bearing, bushing, or single set of ball bearings. Tolerances are atrocious because they were made by drunken lemurs, ...


18

No, not possible. If you want to go the other way, buy a 12 inch bike and then remove the chain/pedals/bottom bracket/bearings and degrease it. Store the parts so they don't rust. Optionally put something over the ends of the BB tube to protect the threads, even some duct tape would help. When the kid is old enough, refit all the transmission parts. ...


17

Your best bet is to use mechanical advantage to your benefit. What you want to do is line the wrench up with the opposite crank, so that your hands are as close together as possible, now straddle the frame and force the two apart. Here's an image from Park's description of how to remove a pedal that illustrates it well: The worst position for the wrench is ...


17

The case for/against clipless, or even straps, is sort of summed up in this piece from the Rivendell Bicycles website. They mention studies, albeit without citing the exact source, that actually pulling up on the pedal is extremely unlikely, except maybe on short uphill or sprint bursts, and so being attached to the pedal is far from being a must. And they ...


17

It's definitely possible that the bottom bracket height is lower than your previous bike and/or your crankarm length is longer. The BB could be lower to improve handling and I have definitely seen longer crankarms on large bikes. A typical measurement is 175cm but you could see 170 on a small frame or 180 on a larger frame. The longer crankarm would be ...


17

Cornering at slow speeds is easy. Cornering fast, that's where it starts getting harder. You're getting pedal strike because your pedal is lower than the road surface, so consider not pedaling through the faster corners. Instead, put your outside pedal down and put your weight on that leg. IE, for a left turn you should be pressing on your right leg. At ...


17

This sounds like a issue in your freehub/freewheel (both are mechanically the same for this question). This is what allows you to coast without pedaling. Inside these bodies are a set of "pawls" which will flip down and engage a series of splines when rotated "forward", and propels the bike forward. Then, if you move them in the other direction "backwards"...


17

You can get spacers to move the pedal further from the crank. Combine these with some larger pedals and you should be OK. Probable worth seeing a bike fit specialist in your situation though.


16

Lengthening the wrench is your best bet. You don't need anything fancy, find a bit of pipe at your local hardware shop that fits over the wrench. Watch your fingers. While trying to remove a tricky pedal, it gave suddenly and my knuckles hit the teeth of the chain ring. It was a daft and bloody mistake.


16

The simple answer is that 'clipless' pedals and shoes just function better than toe straps. They are easier to get into, easier to get out of, locate the foot more accurately and solidly on the pedal, and allow for better transfer of power all the way around the pedal stroke. The position of the foot on the pedal can also be precisely adjusted, as can the ...


15

Flat pedals are great for lots of reasons, but I won't get into the virtues or pitfalls of platforms versus toe clips versus clipless systems (though I am a big fan of plain old platform pedals.) I will try to give information pertaining to the different styles and a few examples rather than an exhaustive list of specific brands and prices. There are lots ...


15

Welding aluminum and steel is not a DIY skill - read This. If you must repair rather than replace, a helicoil is the correct way to address the problem. A crank would be cheaper than the coil alone, let alone the time to fix it. Chemical bonding (AKA. Glue) is probably the only DIY solution. The issue I see is that when a pedal comes off while riding, it ...


14

I doubt that you actually managed to screw your pedals into the wrong sides. If it can even be done, the amount of force required to do so would have easily alerted you that you were doing something dreadfully wrong. Not to mention the aluminum shavings that would have been all over the place. Pedals can get pretty snug just through the action of peddling ...


14

Clipless pedals let you pull up a bit and road shoes are rigid-ish, so you can get some more power from each turn (of course, you're using your muscles in a bit of a different way). This also gives a bit of a different pressure distribution than platform pedals (look at the layout of say, a Look pedal versus a platform pedal). In an off road situation, they ...


14

I'm trying to solve the same problem, and after some searching I've ordered something like this: It's a plastic pad that you clip on clipless pedals to ride them with normal shoes. I'm not sure about their efficacy with wet weather and sure they don't allow pulling upwards, but for riding to work I think they would do. As Criggie suggests in the comments, ...


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