Hot answers tagged

21

Clipless pedals hold your feet more securely and release easier than toe-straps and clips. As you are probably aware, it is possible to to tighten straps to the point where they must be released before the foot can be removed from the pedal. A properly functioning clipless pedal will always release the riders foot.


16

The simple answer is that 'clipless' pedals and shoes just function better than toe straps. They are easier to get into, easier to get out of, locate the foot more accurately and solidly on the pedal, and allow for better transfer of power all the way around the pedal stroke. The position of the foot on the pedal can also be precisely adjusted, as can the ...


14

Your goal is to apply torque to the cleat as you would with your foot in a shoe. So essentially you need something like a gigantic flat screwdriver. I have a mini crowbar that would do the job, for example, but if you have any metal tyre levers they might be big enough. Slacken off any tension adjusting screw first


9

The pedal bearings are failing in some way. This may range from a ball or race physically broken to a simple lack of grease. Depending on what kind of pedals you have you may be able to service or replace the bearings. The video linked at the end of this answer shows what's required to do so. It's possible but somewhat of a pain. You have to have the ...


8

My personal preference goes out to MTB Flat-pedals because they offer good grip and a large platform for the foot (which is more comfortable for the foot in my experience). Make sure to get them with metal (replaceable if possible) pins if possible, some cheaper models have plastic 'pins' which are part of the pedal's plastic body (so they are non ...


7

Use water-pump-pliers or locking pliers (vise-grip). Grip the cleat and turn it either clock-wise or anti-clock-wise Alternatively a medium sized screwdriver used as a lever at the rear 'nose' of the cleat will pop it out. Mind fingers and eyes, though! It might be a good idea for both methods to reduce the spring tension of the pedal by turning the ...


6

I know I am late to the party, and maybe this is too late for the OP. However, the facts have changed since the last two answers: SRM just announced a set of mountain bike pedals that are compatible with Shimano SPD cleats. The price is 1,000 Euros. The link above goes to an industry observer, and he thinks US pricing could be similar. Availability in ...


6

Those are not clipless pedals and you don't need any kind of special shoes. Those are pedals with toe clips and are meant to be used with regular running shoes.


5

My wife and I have ridden a tandem for 2 years. Shortly after buying it we wanted to ride High Pass Challenge, a ride up to an observation point on Mt. St. Helens. As newbies, we were not very good at stand-up pedaling together and I had to keep a death grip on the handlebars to keep the tandem going straight with the pedals in synch and my wife's weight ...


5

According to Bikes At Work: Our experience has been that most people can comfortably pull 300 lbs (137 kg) with a typical mountain bike and cargo trailer or cargo trike. How quickly a person can move load of that weight will depend on his or her physical condition. Someone in reasonable physical condition can generally pull a 300 lb load at 10 mph (16 km/...


5

If the clicking stops when you stand up, the first suspects are the parts you sit on: saddle and seat post.


4

First verify that you are in fact trying to screw the left pedal into the left crank arm and the right pedal into the right crank arm. The pedals are sometimes marked with a R and L on the end of the threaded section. The left side is the side your left hand is on while riding. There are 2 common size pedal threads. Many children's bikes, some lower cost ...


4

If you plan on upgrading to a better bike, replace the cranks, don't repair them. You won't be able to return the bike to REI, so you'll be selling it. Cranks repaired with helicoils will not look good to potential buyers. Square taper triple cranksets are cheap, but there are a couple of pitfalls. If you are replacing the crank yourself you'll need a ...


4

If you installed the pedals incorrectly, you likely damaged the other crank as well. I'd buy a new set of pedals and have a competent repair shop heli-coil the cranks (both, if necessary) for you. I believe this would be the cheapest fix (if you plan to keep the bike). As for the return and other issues, I have no idea what REI's policies are and whether ...


4

For me, a big benefit of cycling with "clipless" pedals is that when I "clip in" to my "clipless" pedals my foot is instantly firmly attached at my ideal pre-set position-- fore/aft, inboard/outboard, toe in/toe out. When using "clips and straps" I am endlessly wiggling my foot to try to find the best position. All this is adjustable by adjusting the ...


4

SPDs can be clear of the ground, depending on your shoes. I use SPDs with Specialized Cadet (discontinued) and Giro Rumble shoes, which are fully recessed. I walk a few km a day in them, and have been known to run in them. On a perfectly flat surface the cleats don't touch the ground when walking on either of them, but they often find bits of grit or ...


4

Here are my measurements... Egg Beater: 6.3 mm SPD 2-bolt: 6.8 mm Time Atac: 7.0 mm Notes: All measured at the highest point with digital calipers. All were measured unmounted (I had 'em in a parts box) Sample size: one pair of each The Egg Beaters were new, unused and about a year old SPD and Time were slightly used and have been in storage for a ...


4

A pedal spacer such as those available here would move your pedal away from the crank arm. Regardless of the approach you take, you should be aware that by making your stance on the bike wider, you will subtly change the way muscles and tendons are loaded, which poses a risk (probably a small risk) of developing knee/hip/back injuries.


3

You question is difficult to answer directly because bike and rider mass isn't a major factor that determines velocity for a given rider power output. A rider exerts force on the pedals which translates into a force that moves the bike forward. At a constant speed the forward motion is opposed by aerodynamic drag, all the friction in drivetrain components ...


3

Some pedals don't spin particularly freely from new. This is OK as the friction does not increase with load and is a tiny power loss. Often happens on MTB pedals to get a tight seal to keep rubbish out - after a short time rubbish in the bearing costs more than the seal in terms of power loss. If the pedals used to spin freely, you possibly throwing away a ...


3

A pedal is made of two major components. The pedal body, which is where your foot presses. This part rotates around the pedal axle once per crank revolution. It does not rotate with respect to the ground or your foot. The pedal axle, which supports the body and threads into the crank arm. The axle does not rotate with respect to the crank arm, but does ...


3

Factors that make a good pedal: Matching Thread size for your cranks - Your pedals will 99% likely be 9/16" thread, mirrored. If its a kids bike then they may be 1/2" thread, but that's unlikely. Weight - lighter is "better" Reflectors - for road use, some countries mandate pedal reflectors. Some pedals don't have them. Build quality - metals tend to beat ...


3

I would not ride with that crank as photographed, for anything more than a slow and careful "get home" temporary ride, with myself not rising from the saddle at all. The pedal thread is only 2/3 to 5/8 there, and the thread that is missing is the side nearest your pedal, which is the fulcrum of the lever. Stresses on the remaining threads would be much ...


3

If you re-install the pedal and and ride with it the pedal may definitely become detached again. It did it before after all! I'd be suspicious that the pedal axle is not engaging all the threads in the crank, and that's why some are left relatively undamaged after the axle pulled out. If the pedal axle can really engage the the remaining threads there is a ...


3

The metal plates are only part of the contact area. In my opinion the 5700 pedals are SO good, you can’t go wrong with either model. If cost is a factor you will get years of excellent performance and durability from both. There is a smaller rectangular raised section between the metal contact plates that also contacts the cleats.


3

You'll have some things to measure, and some decisions to make. First, you need to know what the threads on your cranks are. There's a 99% chance they are 9/16" with a tiny chance of 1/2" thread. You need to match whatever interface your cranks have. You're committed to flat pedals, which does limit things a lot. Don't rule out clipless pedals, or ...


3

If you have a relatively big bench vice (or some other big clamps like woodworking clamps) you could consider making a DIY axle extractor to get the job done: 1) Take a wooden beam (approx 4x4cm or larger size also good as long as it's manageable) and saw off a bit of approx 20cm. drill a hole in the middle which will fit the threaded end of the pedal ...


3

You could try BMX pedals. They are typically very large, which gives good support when jumping around doing tricks. It also means you have more flexibility as to where to put your foot on the pedal.


2

I saw this question in my sidebar, and I believe I can offer some substantive information. @Kibbee's answer above is correct: if you need a wider stance than a stock pedal, you can get spacers or extenders that fit between the pedal and where it threads into the crank. The OP implemented this answer. For future readers looking at clipless pedals, those ...


2

the pedal wobbles in the arm That sounds like a stripped pedal thread. If the cranks are inexpensive or dubious, replacing them could be cheapest. But in some cases a good bike mechanic can repair a stripped pedal thread by installing a helicoil or similar coiled insert - basically they tap out the hole for a yet larger size, and the wire insert fills up ...


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