New answers tagged

1

If you have a relatively big bench vice (or some other big clamps like woodworking clamps) you could consider making a DIY axle extractor to get the job done: 1) Take a wooden beam (approx 4x4cm or larger size also good as long as it's manageable) and saw off a bit of approx 20cm. drill a hole in the middle which will fit the threaded end of the pedal ...


1

I change cleats when they're worn to the point of a corner/ledge is missing chunks. At this level of wear, the cleat can unclip easily and sometimes spontaneously. In this state I can still ride, though not as aggressively on take-off or high power. If you have an event coming up, like a race, a long ride, a group ride, or similar, then change your ...


2

This assumes you can get some sort of shoe that works for you with toe clips, if we can help you get the toe clips to work. These ideas involve modifying parts to some extent, so you'd need to be rather careful including testing them in safe conditions, and keep an eye on them in case they wear faster than you'd expect. It may be possible to fit removable ...


2

Lake makes several shoes in wide widths. I’m particularly partial to their sandals for my wide feet (but depending on what kind of club you’re aiming to join, they may not be the right look).


1

It would be a serious commitment, but you could get custom cycling cleats made. In the plus column, you know they'd fit you perfectly. In the minus column, they'd be very expensive--I did a quick search, and it looks like the going price is about US$1000 for a pair. I have seen off-the-shelf shoes up to European size 50, FWIW. I would avoid anything too ...


0

Try to just remove the pedals, clean them really well, then reinstall the pedals. If you have the tools and grease on hand this is very fast and easy to do. It might not solve your problem but it might and costs basically nothing in time and money to try. If you don’t have the tools or grease, you can buy them at any bike shop for under $20; or maybe your ...


0

In the end it turned out that it was bottom bracket bearings. It seems that last generation of high end square taper Campagnolo had small bearings that were notorious for this. It was not the cups with threads, because I could find only a BB cartridge for different standard and reused the old cups. The strange thing is that when uninstalled, the bearings ...


1

I had a similar problem. ONe click each time the left pedal was at the low position. CHanged bottom bracket - no luck. Lubed seat and handle bar - no luck. Thought maybe if i switch the pedals that if the noise is on the other side then it would be the pedal. Well the left pedal was so tightly on that I knew once I got it off then added a drop of oil and ...


2

Sounds to me like your derailleur is not properly shifting (to the smaller cog) in those gears you mentioned. First thing to check (imo): Put the bike in a bike stand or position it upside down, shift onto smallest rear cog. Watch the cassette/chain whilst pedaling with one hand and shifting with the other hand. Check if the chain properly shifts each ...


9

The pedal bearings are failing in some way. This may range from a ball or race physically broken to a simple lack of grease. Depending on what kind of pedals you have you may be able to service or replace the bearings. The video linked at the end of this answer shows what's required to do so. It's possible but somewhat of a pain. You have to have the ...


2

Perhaps a broken ball in your ball bearing. You can quite easily and cheaply buy replacement balls but in general the bearing races are harder to get replacement parts for (however if they are quite expensive pedals you might be able to find them). Replacing a ball is quite doable. Unscrew the nut at the end of the pedal axle. Pull the pedal off (make sure ...


0

9/16" is most likely but not 100% certain.


2

The Nordic Track GX 4.7 comes with a three piece crank so it has 9/16 pedals.


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