New answers tagged

1

I assume it's the left pedal, which can indeed work itself loose as you pedal. So, unfortunately, when a pedal comes loose, most people's immediate reaction is to thread it back on and go about their day. In fact, it really ought to be examined closely to determine why it came loose the first time, and then carefully reinstalled with the proper torque. You ...


4

There are always options. From OP's link, showing boom and bolts. Shorten the boom, if you can. There are two pinch bolts in the main frame, under the boom Back them both off and see how much can be inserted into the frame. You probably already did this, but revisit it and see if there's extra length to be saved. Perhaps the inner tube bottoms out, and ...


1

Directly answering the OP's question: Speedplay Zeroes have 15 degrees of float. The OP seems to be confused by the quote from Speedplay's literature. The Zero has less float than the X-series pedal, which I believe was released in the 1990s and had 20 degrees of float. 15 degrees is still much more float than most other common systems. I believe one version ...


1

I found the answer in this document: https://si.shimano.com/pdfs/dm/DM-PD0002-07-ENG.pdf#page27 NOTE: Right-hand thread: Black-colored (without slit) If the fitted lock nut is black-colored (without slit), the cone and the lock nut have a right-hand thread. Left-hand thread: Black-colored (with slit) Silver-colored If the fitted lock nut is silver-colored ...


2

All answers are spot on, I just want to add a couple of tiny details. You set your pedal tension to low (something like max tight minus 8 clicks). You ride for a week clipping and unclipping often. It becomes intuitive already ... but never quite as easy as flats. Now what? Well, now do never forget that you can ride SPDs unclipped! When starting at a busy ...


1

I had the same problem but it "turned out" (pun?) that I needed to just twist the foot like it was on a turntable with the force of opening a jar. I was trying, mistakenly to tip it out and to the side, like a boat tipping over. The latter doesn't work.


10

Judging from your videos, it appears that the chainrings and crank are no longer connected. It appears that you have something called a one-piece crankset. If you are confident that you can learn how to disassemble it, I’d say you’re up for the repair. Once you have the crank off the bike, you’ll be able to see how the chainrings and crank arm are connected. ...


6

While we don't have your bike in hand, or at least a video of the issue, it sounds more like your freewheel or your freehub has failed. I suspect that new cyclists might say the gears have failed. Edit: This answer actually mis-diagnosed the problem (albeit I'd argue for good reason - it was given before videos were provided!). I'm leaving it up for general ...


1

Most (all?) bicycles with one-piece cranks accept "standard" 1/2" pedals. The thread is 1/2-20, with the left pedal being left-hand threaded. The wrench size and type varies depending on the pedal. Many cheap or old-school BMX bikes have one-piece cranks.


1

Most pedal threads are 9/16" with the left pedal being left-hand thread (ie backwards to normal) Kids bikes might have 1/2" axles or 9/16" There were some crazy metric threads used in the 80s but they were very rare and never took off. Not sure how you got it to work into a 15/32" other than that's vaguely close to 1/2" suggesting ...


Top 50 recent answers are included