New answers tagged

1

I found an Amazon France listing at https://www.amazon.fr/XLC-Road-LOOK-System-Hipac-PD-S09einseitig-schwarz/dp/B002YEB39M that shows cleats but doesn't name them. To my eye they seem to be Look Delta but its not a great photo. From above the general outline is similar - they have to match the same three-hole bolt pattern. But Keo are much more rounded in ...


2

They are road pedals made by XLC parts. https://www.xlc-parts.com/en/road/bike-parts/pedals/ At XLC you can choose between clip-in pedals based on the SPS or Look system. You should be able work out which system that pedal is using from the part number and get the appropriate set of cleats. Probably either Look or Look Keo. The shape of the back edge ...


3

Seems to be a common problem with this otherwise fine Shimano pedal: the outside end of the axle broke off (because of an excessively tightened nut!?!). Had the same thing happen to me some time ago. Shimano (Paul Lange) claimed I had caused the damage when "servicing the pedal".... Replacement axles are available in the aftermarket.But this only ...


-1

I'd say those are commonly called "road pedals". They are a subset of what are called "clipless pedals." There are corresponding road shoes that fit. From what I see in the US, there's pretty much just two major varieties of clipless pedals and cycling shoes. They're either road pedals and shoes or mountain bike pedals and shoes. I have ...


3

You have the normal standard omnipresent pedal type with a 9/16 inch thread. If the size is not specifically indicated, it almost certainly fits. You canfirm it by some crude measurement. The manufacturer speaks about a 7 mm boron steel axle, but that is hidden inside, it is not the thread diameter. The number on your pedal might be a date of manufacture or ...


0

Hi I'm new here but in a similar spot Our 12" bike has never had the pedals, crank or chain attached, I removed them on day two and created a better quality balance bike. After that, you better check on the size of your 4YO as my girl at 4 1/2 is now too big for her 16", she took on that size just over 3 1/2. 12" balance bike was 2-3YO. I am ...


5

They won't interfere with the batteries (which aren't sensitive to magnets) or the motor (which contains stronger moving magnetic fields). Anyway even in the worst case both are a good few cm away and magnetic fields reduce quickly with distance. Even wiring run along the downtube is reasonably well separated from the pedals, and it takes a lot to induce a ...


3

Almost all adult bikes have 9/16" threads, with 20 TPI. One side is left-hand thread. The other standard option is 1/2" thread which is intended for children's bikes. There are rare vintage standards around 10 and 12mm but your spin bike wouldn't have these. Finally there's a chance your spin bike has some proprietary pedal thread. Do you have ...


3

The Checkpoint is a gravel frame, and that particular model has a road groupset. Unfortunately, while not all gravel frames have this clearance problem, this does illustrate part of the rational for the slightly wider chainline on gravel-specific groups. I would strongly urge you not to get a right-sided power meter based on a Shimano crankarm. It's been ...


0

I think my kids had similar difficulty in learning to pedal. My guess as to what you're describing is that even if the crank arms are totally vertical, he hasn't figured out how to push the top pedal forward to initiate the next pedal stroke. It might help to get him to point his toe down at the bottom of the stroke and point his toe up at the top of the ...


0

Your bicycle was assembled incorrectly. Take it back to where you purchased it and ask that they fix or replace it, or take it to a bike shop to be assembled properly. Let me also add a note in favor of @mattnz 's comment. Turning this into a balance bike may be the easiest solution. On the other hand, my child never took to a balance bike and needed ...


2

12 inch wheel bikes like this one: are designed so that the pedals will not turn just by turning the wheels. They are designed so that when the rider pedals the wheels turn. Once some momentum is gained the rider can stop pedaling and the bike will coast forward. The rider engages the brakes by pedaling backwards - this is a coaster brake. If your bike is ...


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