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3

I would just add that a clean thread is a happy thread. Whenever threads are stiff or sticking, a good clean will usually improve things considerably. In this case the best tool for the job is an old toothbrush with the bristles shortened to about half their original length, or a little more than that (it's a bit fiddly but it's worth it). Use some kind of ...


1

There are a number of issues in the pedal-crank joint: They fail. Early and often. If a heavyweight rider uses the same crank for a period of years to tens of years and rides a lot, it soon becomes apparent that the crank is indeed weaker than for example the chainwheel. If will fail due to cracking at the pedal eye. They sometimes become so tight that ...


4

Sounds like you tightened them too tight. You did everything else right - pedals on the right side, threaded the right way, grease. So, if you had to use a 6 foot cheater bar you might have used a little too much muscle when tightening. According to bikeride.com pedals should be torqued to something between 276 and 354 inch pounds or 29 to 40 Newton Meters ...


2

Pedals are not intrinsically self-tightening. If they are tightened sufficiently in the first place they will not get tighter by themselves, at least not in the sense of rotating further into the cranks. You can confirm this by marking the pedals and cranks and monitoring them over time. The fact that the left pedals have left hand threads is largely ...


0

What kind of bike do you have? Are you using clipless pedals? It is hard to answer without knowing more. Some things I have experienced to cause something similar are: Issues with cleat and pedal interface - Some wet lube helps fix this on the cleat Your left crank arm has play in it (never felt it first hand, but is possible) Something is going on with ...


2

It can be many kinds of stuff. The obvious to look for are the pedal bearings, the bottom bracket bearings or the interface between the crankarms and the bottom bracket (for 3-piece cranks) or the interface between the crank spindle and the left crank (2-piece crank), but many other things could do it. It is useful to test the pieces in isolation. Disconnect ...


3

All 3-bolt shoe plates are M5 (5mm by 0.8mm per thread). So are 2-bolt. That's the thread size insofar as the wider world is concerned. That's not really what you care about. What you ideally want is a Look Delta cleat bolt that's the right length for your shoe. They are funny little bolts and can be hard to find in just the right length if the stock ones ...


1

There have been power meters built into rear hubs, cranks, bottom brackets, chain tension readers, and even air-based meters, so you can get a power reading while riding for real, without having to use power-based pedals. I have an old cycle computer headunit that estimates power based on speed and rate-of-change of elevation using a barometric sensor (ie ...


2

On another forum (see responses by Anna Ronkainen), it was pointed out that if your shoes touch the power meter pods, that may cause erroneous power readings. Basically, you are introducing a side load to the strain gauge assembly in the pods. I am not an engineer, but my (extremely limited) understanding is that the strain gauge assembly is designed to ...


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