11

Arguably, just the time it takes you to get from point A to point B is a perfectly good measurement of improvement (same with average speed) As you say, wind influences this, as does countless other factors - traffic lights, weather (wind, wet roads, snow and ice, etc..) However, unless you are remarkably lucky or remarkably unlucky, these variables will ...


8

There are several phone apps / web sites you can use. They all have a free mode and a premium mode. A few of them are: Endomondo Last time I used this (a couple of years back) it was able to give real time updates and "coaching" on your performance. It can handle many different sports and activities. MapMyRide I haven't used this; some other people here do ...


7

I've just started using an android app called IPbike. If you like tweaking settings and getting the items displayed just right it could be good for you; if not, look elsewhere. It can apparently sync with Strava etc, though I don't use that feature, and can import routes. It uses openstreetmap (a plus point for me as I've made a few contributions myself). ...


6

In short no. You're actually better off measuring power, through a powertap, SRM or similar ergometer. This gives you a measure of your physical performance that is absolute. So your speed is a factor of your power output, chain efficiency, wind resistance, drag, tyre performance, road surface, atmospheric pressure, and gradient. It is almost impossible to ...


6

A decent amount of bike computers have bluetooth or ANT+ on them, which you can connect to your phone or whatever and read out (as a work around). Apps like runkeeper can also track distance based on GPS roughly. To quote the fitbit people: "All Fitbit trackers are optimized for walking, running, and general household and lifestyle activities. It will ...


3

Depending on where you live, wind can be highly unpredictable and fickle. I use Google weather (google for "wind speed" and then click on "wind"; n.b. this apparently won't work in some mobile browsers) to get a rough idea of what the winds are going to be like for the day. However, I have found that even this can be horribly inaccurate if you ride any ...


3

I use the Misfit Shine and it lets you specify the type of activity you are doing. You configure it so that it knows what type of activity you are going to do (cycling). I clip it to my sox and when you start cycling you have to tap it 3 times to tell it you are stating a ride. It runs aboout 3 - 4 months on a battery (2032) and I have accidently run it ...


2

I have found that they either tend to over record or totally under record- depending on the type of surface that I am cycling on. I have found the best is just to add the activity manually on their website with the distance/time.


2

There are several that you can try, many of which are listed here. Should that link go down, here's the apps listed at that page: CycloMeter Cycle Tracks GPS Run the Map


2

Here are a few apps that should be able to use open street map and record GPS tracks: Simple OSM http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/store/app/simple-osm/9710865b-2c38-e011-854c-00237de2db9e GPX Travel Map http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/store/app/gpx-travel-map/13a79a34-c283-4f5c-b3fb-4d02e3f4f43a Navi Computer http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/store/app/...


2

Windows Phones + Open street map I know strava requires installation of the googlemaps app to function, but they don't make anything for windows. If you want to use their service of comparing against different users, you can upload data from another app as long as its the right format (which should be possible with any of those open street map apps for ...


2

iBike is a power meter that uses the same thinking as yours. Instead of measuring forces produces by your legs, it calculates power based on speed, gradient and wind resistance. So what you get is power measurements that has wind resistance factored in as you want, plus gravity and other resistance. see http://ibikesports.com/how_iBike_works.html Compared ...


2

That got me thinking: rather than work out the effort above my 'wine cask' resistance level, I ought to be able to work out the 'effort above flat' implied by the level of resistance I dial in What you are attempting to do is calibrate your heart-rate on the indoor trainer to real-world riding - and this is far too complicated. Since there are so many ...


2

Might I enquire your age? This answer will be a bit vague without that, but you can work it out backwards. The rule of thumb says that your max heart rate is 220-(your age in years) I'm 40, so 180 would be my "100%" heart rate. This table shows cycling This chart shows the "zones" So your 130 BPM is likely to be the "weight loss zone" for under ...


1

The GPX files produced by GPS devices are just XML so can fairly easily be edited by computer programs (and simple edits like removing sections where your GPS glitched out can even be done “by hand” with a text editor). The XML schema includes fields for all kinds of things, including heart rate. It seems the FitBit Charge can export data in CSV format, ...


1

I know this is an old article, but I thought you'd like to know that you can also sync Garmin TO Nike+, but not the other way around. And it does accurately transfer your data. It does automatically title it a run, but when you go to the Nike website, it does recognize it as cycling.


1

Nike+ is designed for running, the data captured while cycling may not be accurate or useful. I would recommend Strava as a fitness-tracking service which supports multiple sports. It is possible to export your old activities from Nike+ to GPX files which can be imported into Strava (or other apps like Endomondo, Runkeeper...).


1

I use a Garmin Forerunner 235 which has these features. The heart rate monitor is built into the back of the watch, rather than using a chest strap which I think the Polar model does. It can also connect to bike speed/cadence sensors, your smart phone etc. A dedicated bike computer like the Garmin Edge 810 is also useful as it adds a map display and route ...


1

I use IPbike for Android. It has strava upload in case you want it but also gives you files in sensible formats by sensible means. It's got sensor integration but I use it with only GPS. You can give it a good try before you buy. The author is no stranger to this site; despite being almost a neighbour of mine according to play store, I've no connection (...


1

I put on a pair of socks, slip my Vivofit 2 inside the sock and wrap around my ankle. It doesn't move and I walk around or ride my bike and it counts everything!


1

New answer to an old question. Strava is the new thing on the block, and has been around since 2011. You get a client running on a smartphone and it does the tracking. Its also possible to synch from garmins and dedicated cycle computers with GPS, but that still needs USB. The website has a lot of social aspects, with leaderboards and best segments. ...


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