43

The Pedaling Technique of Elite Endurance Cyclists: Changes With Increasing Workload at Constant Cadence was published in the International Journal of Sport Biometrics 7:29-53, 1991. However, it seems to come to the conclusion that they don't really make any difference as far as pedaling efficiency goes. "...while torque during the upstroke did reduce the ...


22

First things first: A belt is probably slightly less efficient than a properly installed clean chain. The test you link already indicates that. Probably with the tension Gates requires you'll loose a bit more power. On to your question: The chain is 200 grams heavier than the belt, of course with the chain you get gears, which you don't get with a belt ...


18

The case for/against clipless, or even straps, is sort of summed up in this piece from the Rivendell Bicycles website. They mention studies, albeit without citing the exact source, that actually pulling up on the pedal is extremely unlikely, except maybe on short uphill or sprint bursts, and so being attached to the pedal is far from being a must. And they ...


16

Jan Heine performed some wind tunnel tests of "Real World Aerodynamics" a few years ago. A link to a blog post (and the results published in Bicycle Quarterly) can be found here. Those tests cover only one component (the aero drag component) of commuter-type bicycles vs. "racing" bikes. If you want to make your own apples-to-apples comparisons of ...


14

The general idea of "lever drive," or a reciprocating pedal motion instead of a rotary pedal motion precedes even the invention of the modern diamond-frame bicycle--consider the Special Star from 1886. More recently, there was the Facet Biocam, the Alenax, and the Wall Walker. Within the world of reciprocating drivetrains, the String Bike is interesting in ...


12

Presuming you are doing a standing start and coming to a complete stop at the top of the hill. The simple requirement is you need energy to move your from the bottom to the top. Most of the energy required will be to raise potential energy of the payload (you and the bike). Essentially you will be creating kinetic energy (moving the bike) by converting ...


10

Riding at 30kph average for 3 hours, in a hilly area is a solid effort. Assuming your pack riding skills are sufficient, you will also likely do fine in in a club ride that averages 30-40kph (but see the pack riding primer below). Club rides will have a faster pace than what you are riding now, but you will also be working a lot less (about 30% less) at any ...


10

You basically get what you pay for, so there isn't any secret formula. Trek is one of the largest manufacturers on the planet, and is probably as good as any other on the market. But have a look at, and test if possible, other bikes as well as Trek, because different models have different geometries, and another geometry might feel better to you. Size also ...


9

I am continuously amazed at the overemphasis placed on the weight of bikes. Yes it is important, but relative to other factors in deciding which bike to buy it is not that significant. Lets compare a 20lb bike to a 24lb bike. If your budget is $1000 for a new bike, would you choose a 20lb bike with very good components and a so-so feel/fit, or a 24lb bike ...


9

The most likely problem is that the brakes are rubbing. If you pick up the front of the bike, hold your head near the brakes and spin the wheel you shouldn't hear any noise from the brakes. If you do, then the brakes are rubbing and that's the first problem to be fixed. To be honest, I'd guess that's 99% likely to be your problem. If you have fenders, ...


8

Everything is relative. For 99% of the population 30kph for 3 hours would be amazing. For a male A grade club rider it would be an off day. For a female A grade club rider it's not bad for a solo training ride. About bunches Sometimes an ad hoc bunch forms in a popular road. These can be dangerous - you don't know the experience level of these people, ...


8

Not easily. V-brake levers pull twice as much cable as a calliper brake levers, so you'll not be able to swap them without swapping the levers too, and these are often attached to the shifters, so you'd end up swapping an awful lot of parts. Additionally V-brakes are mounted to a pair of bosses on the seat stays & fork legs whilst calliper brakes are ...


8

Bicycles, like many machines, are efficient, but a large amount of energy converted by them is not in fact used for their "intended" purpose: The largest energy sink is air/wind resistance, which you can only very marginally improve on a "normal" bikeā€ . However, wind resistance squares in relation to your speed, so maintaining a more leisurely pace would ...


7

I'd recommend a Cyclocross bike (also called CX). That's a robust road bike frame, configured to accept tyres up to about 40mm wide. You won't need 40mm unless you're doing proper off-roading, but a nice 30-35mm file tread such as a Specialized Trigger or Schwalbe Sammy Slick will run nicely on smooth pavement, will handle cobbles and bad pavement, and ...


7

Are you asking about the immediate effects while high or long-term effects? I can't find any unbiased, well-cited sources except for one from the British Journal of Sports Medicine which basically says that doctors should try to keep athletes from using cannabis due to its possible dangers. However, some sources (of unknown quality) claim that it may help ...


7

This is a deceptively complex question because it touches on many aspects of hub design, and answering it properly would also require taking some kind of survey of what design choices have wound up getting made for the various convertible vs. dedicated size through axle hubs, particularly in terms of what bearing sizes are used. Furthermore, for practical ...


6

Small changes in bike fit make dramatic differences in performance. Heat and humidity make a big difference.


6

The short answer is that it is purely down to your individual training level and mechanical efficiency in each of these disciplines. Bonking is a result of fully depleting your glycogen stores. Once this occurs, your body's only source of fuel to power your exercise is to metabolise fat. This does not change regardless of what activity you are performing. ...


5

It seems like scientists tend to test athletic performance. The actual benefits of clipless pedals are: If you are cycling fast, you get a lot of unanticipated jolts and vibration which can make you slip off of the pedals, particularly if it is wet, muddy or bumpy. Clipless pedals keep you locked in. If your visibility is impaired by riding in the dark, or ...


5

Surprised there are not more studies on efficiency of clipless. The original question was to seek a scientific answer, not anecdotal, although many feel clipless gives more, this is subjective if not backed by science. This is the only article I found: http://www.radlabor.de/fileadmin/PDF/PowerForce/Mornieux___Stapelfeldt_Artikel_Feedback_Pedalkraefte_2008....


5

Has anyone experimented with using consumer 3D software to do CFD-like aerodynamics simulations? - Yes Could there be any worthwhile insights gained from this? Yes However, you should not view work like this as an alternative to using a powermeter or windtunnel testing. View it as a tool that can be used as an extension of sound methodical testing, to test ...


5

I think you could take this technique pretty far, but probably not all the way (at least usefully). I see a lot of use for the first part of your plan: taking multiple pictures and reconstructing a 3D model. If you try this for multiple postures I think it should be possible to determine an optimal position for you on your bike based on just looking at the ...


5

If I on one ride add 1 kg of weight to the bike, how much slower (in time) will I be? Assuming that you and your bike mass 100kg (in round numbers), an extra 1kg causes a 1% increase in weight, i.e. a 1% increase in the potential energy associated with climbing the hill. If your power output is constant, that implies a 1% increase in time. However some of ...


5

Alloy would save a tiny amount of weight. I wouldn't expect it to make any difference to wheel stiffness, so long as you lubricate the threads when building it (alloy nipples are stiffer to turn otherwise, so it's harder to get the tension right). Brass is stronger, but you shouldn't have to rely on that to get a stiff wheel. But long term, alloy is more ...


5

In terms of climbing at a steady speed, weight on the wheel is exactly the same as weight on the saddle. In terms of acceleration, weight at the rim slows acceleration (but also deceleration) by 2x of the same weight on the saddle.


5

I'm a commuter who has to carry things like books, a notebook, food for the day, bike lock, etc. I should say that it makes a striking difference whether you carry stuff on your back or on a bike rack -- a heavy bike is not as bad as a heavy backpack, in other words. Another thing that I've noticed is that my performance decreases if I ride five days a week ...


5

Because wind resistance is proportional to velocity squared it takes more power to go from 30 to 32 than from 15 to 17. So you get more bang from your pedal power at lower speeds. If it is a relatively short downhill and you have considerable speed you are typically better off coasting and then pedal when you get to a flat or flatter section. So you are ...


5

Training plans are all well and good, but the first goal is to be able to ride 9 hrs. There is no substitute for doing long rides to prepare to do a long ride. In my experience, for just developing pure endurance you get 80-90% of your training effect from a long ride. The rest of your training should be focused around reducing the recovery time to enable ...


5

The optimum pressure for any kind of bike is going to depend on a lot more factors than just the type of bike. You have to look at many other things such as rider weight, terrain, and tire size. It also depends on how you qualify something as optimum. Higher pressures might be optimum in some situations, but may not be very comfortable to the rider, making ...


5

If you are looking for pedalling performance, adjusting the seatpost (up and down) and the seat (back and front) is the answer. There are literature about adjusting seatpost so you can look them up on the internet; youtube also have many video demonstration. Adjusting handlebar height is more about efficiency. In general: the less up-right position, the ...


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