Hot answers tagged

12

No, as offered by @NoCo, is the correct answer. This merely offers some additional information. When you're talking about "normal tires," you mean clincher tires with tubes. These will require new wheels. Unfortunately, if you bought a 1980s bike, you may have an older standard rear wheel - current bikes are 130mm in the rear dropouts, as are ...


9

If you are planning to ride the bike, replace the handlebar stem


9

This is often called "the slippery slope of knock-on upgrades" which can get expensive quickly. There are two simple and relatively cheap upgrades to try. Replace the brake pad inserts with modern compound Kool Stop. They will brake better than the original ones, which may also be a bit hardened with age. There will be a model that fits your brake pad ...


9

No, that person was confused and you have it right. A new 700x25 tire will fit the same as what you have. Often 40 year old wheels will need new rim strips while you're at it.


8

Some mechanic might have put a liberal amount of grease in the BB shell and also in the head-tube prior to assembly. Then copiously greased the seat-post as well. Grease has a tendency to migrate, especially in hot weather and move to the strangest places, the bike may have been stored upside down, head or tail-up. Think of it as a gift from whoever put it ...


8

If you just want a reliable, more comfortable, more efficient and safer bike - just buy a new one. Upgrading older bikes (or even new bikes) requires and investment in time and money: learning about all the different standards in use and parts compatibility, buying special tools, scouring Ebay for parts etc. However, if that is your idea of fun then by all ...


7

No. Tubular rims only work with tubular tires which must be glued or taped on. (added "taped" to be more complete)


6

This looks awfully close to your bike, the 1987 Iseran, USA model: I'm pretty sure the yellow-orange-red "rainbow" markings put your bike in the 1986-1987 time frame. The Iseran does have Shimano shifters spec'd, but the derailleur isn't specified in that link. Your seat post also looks different from the seat post shown in the brochure image, ...


6

You will probably struggle to get a perfect ID on this bike unless you get a response from someone who used to sell them. I have tried to identify Peugeots in the past and there's only so far you can go. The naming scheme is difficult to work with as the model number the bike was sold as is never printed on the bike. The tubing isn't the very best available ...


6

I have a peugeot frame of a similar age and have found it to be more bother than its worth. There was a period when peugeot made an effort to make all of their compenent dimensions round metric numbers. This practice was not adopted by many other manufacturers so getting parts to fit that frame might be a hassle. On my peugeot frame; Steering tube internal ...


6

You're stuck with square taper bottom brackets. But there are plenty of good square taper cranksets still on the market (new and used). You have a few options though: Velo Orange sells a french threaded bottom bracket under their Grand Cru line for about 50 USD (For comparison, the usual Shimano BB-UN55 is about 15 USD) Phil Wood sells french threaded ...


5

Three initial things to do are: Clean the rims, make sure they are free of anything that is acting as a lubricant. YOu may also consider carefully roughening them slightly with a fine grit sandpaper Get the best replacement brake pads you can Make sure the calipers are adjusted correctly and the pads are properly contacting the rim


4

Can't be done, sorry. A French BB shell is about 0.2 mm larger than ISO, so there's no way to make an ISO BB stay put in there. Forget about press-fit; those are typically several mm larger. Even if you had the tools to bore out the hole and remove the threads (while keeping the hole straight), there isn't enough metal in the shell to make the hole of ...


4

I have managed to convert the bottom bracket to work with three piece cranks on my early 1970s UO-8. It originally had cottered cranks. All I had to do was find a square taper bottom bracket spindle that had roughly the same spacing with regard to the bearings as the original. I reused the bottom bracket cups and used loose bearings. I had problems with ...


4

This is really an extension of the answer from @AndrewHenle - I just extended his detective work. I believe the bike is a 1988 'Monaco' I found a paint scheme that matched the OP's bike on the 1988 'Bordeaux': However, this features down tube shifters, so is not the bike in question. Also from 1988 is the 'Monaco'. The picture below shows it in white/blue, ...


4

Following on to Andy P - agreeing that it's a Monaco but the German version. It looks like a 1988 P 8/X Monaco. Peugeot's touring bike offered in Germany. The parts (Center pull Weinmann 750s and Shimano Positron derailleur. Fenders and rack removed.) and frame construction match. The bike in the original post is a different color. Since I can't read the ...


3

I've been down the tubular route on an old 80's road bike I picked up. As already said, the rims are not compatible - tubular rims are curved in the cross section, with no bead; whereas hooked rims (crochet rims / "normal" rims ) have a complex cross section that goes back on itself. As for costs, it depends on your time, technical ability, and what's ...


3

You can mount recessed style brakes on your 80's frame by drilling out the hole through which the brake bolt goes on the backside of your forks such that the recessed style bolt fits through the hole. You may have to get long reach style brake calipers in order for the pads to be able to reach the rim. These would be an option: https://www.amazon.com/...


3

Yes the wheel should fit assuming you have a 'normal' road bike fork installed. I've built maybe a 200 bikes and never had the front wheel spacing be an issue (only axle diameter was an issue when trying to install solid 10mm axle wheels into quick release forks (the solid 10mm axle won't fit in them). If the spacing does differ a tiny bit you should be ...


2

I have a 1975 Peugeot UO18 that I turned into a commuter. I replaced the wheels with 700c contemporaries. The UO18 is the mixte version of your UO8 road bike, so almost all the components are almost the same. Like you, I found that the original Mafacs sucked so I replaced them with Tektro R559 Long Reach Brakes. These had the requisite 55-73mm reach that I ...


2

Looks like the problem is that both the main levers and secondary levers are too far away from the bar, so on the tops, hoods or drop you cannot reach them. If the levers have a reach adjustment, you can position them closer to the bars. Another possibility is to move the whole units further down the drops, which would move the secondary levers closer to ...


2

Yes, you can use 120mm hub. In my opinion the frame is well within tolerance for 70s steel bike. If the difference bothers you, you can add an 1mm spacer to each side between cone and locknut.


2

What ever you do under no circumstances re-tap a bottom bracket from French to English. Sugino makes reasonably priced 165 cranks I'm using them now and I have over 10,000 miles on them. They should fit on your old bottom bracket with no issues. Compass cycles sells SKS BB but like the Phil Wood, they are pricey, I upgraded the cottered cranks on an old ...


2

If the goal is to make it easy and work well, for sure get a modern freewheel, like a Shimano 6-speed hyperglide one. Hyperglide style ramping is the glue that holds indexed shifting together. Even if you jumped through all the hoops needed to try to make it index with the freewheel you've got, it wouldn't work. A lot of gripshifts threaten to take up too ...


2

From searching through the catalogs it looks like the Performance 30 is from 1999 (scroll the page not quite to the bottom)


1

A large vice can be used to clamp the cup and the frame should provide enough leverage, especially since you've almost completely disassembled the bike. Use some penetrating oil from the inside of the BB. Give it some time to seep into the threads. A hair-dryer could be helpful but a hot air gun might damage the paint. French BBs are usually right/right and ...


1

Are the shifters mounted on the stem? Those were a terrible 70's design. A 5 speed bike is almost certainly a freewheel and is not going to have the right tooth profile to work well with indexed shifting. You can get upgraded freewheels that have the hyperglide tooth profile needed to work with indexed shifting, that does lead down a rathole of upgraded ...


1

Answering your numbered questions first: Will the rusty/blank spots be a functional problem down the line? A: Bare steel will rust. It needs to be covered in some way to prevent corrosion. Will power coating work well with the steel frame? A: Powder coating is an option that will work well on a steel frame. Here is a Sheldon Brown article that talks about ...


1

It looks a lot like this 1976 UE-8, except for the front rack.


1

As far as I can remember, when looking for a crankset, for each chainring a number in millimetres is given by what the chainline will be affected. E.g. - for Sturmey-Archer FCT single chainring series it is +4 mm. It means that the sprocket is 4 mm to the right (outside) past the end of the spindle. Knowing this you need to find the correct spindle to get ...


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