New answers tagged

2

I have never had a sore back nor sore arms on a Dutch upright bicycles but have had sore 'sit upon's' if I did not find the right seat/saddle for the bike. As a Dutch person I rode standard Dutch (fixed gear and 5 gear) bicycles for about 30 years before switching to recumbents. Most people I know ride upright bikes for at least a part of the time, many for ...


2

Flat bar tourers are a thing (overlapping to some extent with trekking hybrids). These are built for multi-day rides, so single-day rides of a few hours would be perfectly reasonable. The posture for the spine tends to be more upright on flat bars that on the hoods of drop bars (the position most riders use most of the time, but neither the highest nor the ...


15

If you are looking for the most ergonomic riding position, you should give some kind of recumbent bicycle a serious consideration. I don't have any references to data, and soreness is subjective. But in my personal experience, the recumbent and velomobile riders on longer rides (Paris-Brest-Paris 1200 km, London-Edinburgh-London 1400 km and such) are the ...


-1

To reduce resistance to air currents, the person on the sports bike sits almost horizontally, bending over to the handlebars. The saddle is raised well above the handlebars and the handlebars are pushed forward. This position cannot be called physiological. The load on the arms, back, and neck increases. The center of gravity shifts forward. Athletes are ...


10

I haven't been able to find any scientific papers that focus on distance riding that don't also focus on performance (I also haven't been able to find any where the full text is available for free, but that's another story). There are more than just upright and drop-bar positions on bikes. One paper I saw (by a company that makes parts for "comfort ...


Top 50 recent answers are included