12

In my experience (week long camping / bike touring trips), I have never thought "Man, I wish I had a chair." I have often thought, "I have packed way too much stuff." There are a few things to consider. You have looked into weight and cost, but there is also space and time considerations. Volume: Do you have space on your rack to put this? How small does ...


12

Google maps tries to do this in biking mode to begin with: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/03/biking-directions-added-to-google-maps.html Mapquest is also hill aware to some extent: http://blog.mapquest.com/2011/04/21/cycle-route-planner-aerial-languages/ (I have tried this, but I don't think its particularly great. But I haven't tried it in SF). ...


8

http://ridewithgps.com is the tool my local bike club uses. It doesn't plan routes for you, but had several overlays including Google's bike routes and topo maps. As you plot your route the graph at the bottom shows the altitude and grade. I live in Seattle and find that Ride With GPS works great for finding reasonable routes through the hills.


8

Will you be in Hokkaido? We toured there extensively this summer and cycled through several dozen tunnels: here our findings. They might apply to other parts of Japan. Newest tunnels on big roads have wide side pavements where you can (and possibly are supposed to) cycle. Safety is not an issue but you might have to dismount to make it on the pavement and ...


7

If you look at the riders who do well in these events, of course they don't sleep much, but beyond that (and not wasting time*) they don't have so much in common though I can think of a few examples where the winner skipped a night early on and kept that lead. Some sleep sooner but shorter. Crucially they only sleep when they really have to, and know enough ...


6

It will take a lot of work, but you can get the data you need from trackleaders.com First you bring up the live tracker for the year you are interested in for example for Mike Hall's record run http://trackleaders.com/tourdivide16 Next you navigate to the 'Race Flow' tab. This shows a time vs distance chart for the top racers that year. You can look for ...


5

It's a year later, but you haven't yet accepted an answer, so this is how I would approach it. Keep in mind that I love bicycling on the road and think bicycling on the Interstate system is a fun and exciting pastime... After looking at your map and spending a little quality time with Street View, my first choice would be the obvious highway route, at least ...


5

For significant climbs, the VAM ( french? for meters climbed per hour ) is all you need to know. If you know your VAM and the height of the climb, then that's how long the climb will take. Road or MTB, it doesn't vary much in my experience unless the trail requires significant hike-a-bike. Walking speeds just don't vary that much so Naismith's rule ...


5

As you have noted, the problem is slightly more complicated for a bicycle since aerodynamic drag is a larger component. However, one can combine two rules of thumb which are given in these two bicycles.stackexchange answers (How do I calculate power to climb a hill and How many miles of riding are equivalent to one mile of running) to make an estimate of ...


5

Just living off that stuff requires your digestive system to adjust, so if you try it you should build it into your diet well in advance, and as a major component. Don't forget to take into account how much extra you need compared to a typical lifestyle. It can't really save you any weight compared to other dehydrated foods, as a gram of carbs is a gram of ...


4

Generally speaking, Saturdays and Sundays are quieter than weekdays. The Department of Transport collects various statistics on road use. This table (TRA0307) shows average traffic by time and day of the week. There's also this table (TRA0306) which shows average traffic by day for different road types and different vehicles. Finally, there are statistics ...


4

Yes, use strava map builder, and turn on the min elevation option: The only bad thing about the app builder is the app itself is sluggish over time (something wrong with my browser?), but it's no a big deal, since you can always save a route and refresh the page. Also, If I plan a long route, I've found strava heatmap is pretty useful , although popular ...


4

Unfortunately, there is single answer to this question. In my experience, every route is unique, and will have variables that increase or decrease the transit time for a particular commute. Traffic, seasonal weather, time of day for the commute, rider's fitness, and bicycle condition will all play a role in determining the time for a given route. If you ...


4

This is how we did it, for all tunnels longer than 150 meters (ranging from 200 meters to 4 km): before the entrance of the tunnel, the leader slows down or even stop, allowing the follower to get closer after entering the tunnel with lights on, regardless if there is a cyclable sidewalk or not, every once in a while the leader ring once his bell if the ...


4

Japan has relatively modest vehicle emission regulations - certainly not to EU standards. The worst that I experienced is diesel soot from buses and trucks. Luckily, rural Japan has depopulated to the extent that you can generally route in a way to avoid traffic. As far as tunnels go... For shorter tunnels, there's not much you can do except hold your ...


4

By day 3 of my first long bicycle tour I realized how much stuff that I thought was essential was not. I ended up shipping stuff home, giving it away, and whatever else I could do. I would recommend that you skip the chair - even if it's lightweight, it's going to take up precious space.


4

Go to your local bike shops and ask them about group rides, local cycling associations, that sort of thing. If there's not one really "local" to you, find the best one you can find in your part of the state. The ACA runs organized tours that you could join. Obviously money is involved. They may also know of some other resources. There are other tour ...


3

In the UK, Cyclestreet does this. I just tried a route over the Forth Road Bridge, starting and ending on the shore. On the elevation profile you can clearly see that it goes up to 40m (the height of the bridge) and is not projected onto the surface, which would be sea level: Cyclestreet is based in map data from OpenStreetMap, but it is not clear if ...


3

For those still interested, there's a pretty solid map site available now covering the US. Not everything is on there, and you can add more gravel roads as you find them. https://gravelmap.com/#9.57/36.2029/-86.7234


3

http://brouter.de/brouter-web/ Uses OpenStreetMap which is usually much better than Google Maps for Cycling. There are also 2 distinct bicycle profiles (fastbike and trekking) available and you can customize them.


3

For the BRouter-web frontend and BRouter Android application, there is also many script based custom routing profiles that calculate with SRTM based elevation of supposed routes. The fully offline mode, together with LocusMap/OSMAnd/Oruxmaps applications, can be great advantage.


3

https://bikeroll.net shows you a nicely colored altitude profile where you can easily spot out the difficult part of the route.


2

The roading network in the UK is well categorised so understanding what the different categories of roads are will assist you in planning a route: M Roads motorways bicycles are banned from using these. A Roads major roads intended to provide large-scale transport links within or between areas. These are generally dual carriageways and will have ...


2

The full answer is it depends, as Chris has commented. If it is really a country road, you can also encounter farm animals as they are being moved, or farm machinery (or it can encounter you). This can happen on any day of the week, as can the other kinds of traffic. In general the only category that might be expected to decline is commercial trucking on a ...


2

Yes. On Google maps you can plan a route. The Google earth picture will also give you almost a 3-dimensional view. If you use the Ctrl+C button and copy the link from Google maps of your profile (it looks like a chain in the box that appears to the left of the map). Then do a google search and type in 'GPS Visualizer'. It is (currently) a free program that ...


2

The RideWithGPS Android and iPhone apps now also offers this with subscription payment. http://ridewithgps.com/app As mentioned before, the RideWithGPS website is useful for trip planning, you can customize your cue sheets, save maps and route for offline use, etc.


2

I know someone who suffers panic attack on bridges so it would be a similar situation. A good workaround is to push really hard physically in these times, e.g. do a sprint race in tunnels (or bridges). The rush of adrenaline annihilates the panic and shift the focus to the body effort instead of the environment. Worth a try?


2

Are there ever! I'm totally evangelizing for the adventure cycling association in my answer here, but check this out: Adventure Cycling Route Network. They have a lot of road tours but they do mountain tours as well. You want the extreme of extreme backcountry mountain bike tours? How does 4418km of trail riding along the continental divide sound? Check ...


2

None of the bike routing services I have tried or asked about know about tunnels. They don't even mention them on route/cue sheets (unless presumably the road name has "tunnel" in it) so a text-search fails too. When it comes to scanning the route for tunnels, OpenStreetMap (standard or humanitarian layer) is clearer when zoomed out to a reasonable scale ...


2

I use Google maps (set to 'cycling mode') and Strava to plan routes. Both try to find the 'best' route between the start and end points but allow fine control of the route by setting intermediate waypoints. Each will give you details of the route including distance and a gradient profile. Google maps tends to find routes based on cyclepaths, bike friendly ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible