18

I took a pretty quick look at the map, but I'm going to make a kind of general suggestion: If this is a trip that you're only used to traveling by motor vehicle, you might fall into the trap of thinking that the route you're used to is the only route available. Bikes can go lots of places that cars can't, and lots of places that cars just as frequently don't....


12

In my experience (week long camping / bike touring trips), I have never thought "Man, I wish I had a chair." I have often thought, "I have packed way too much stuff." There are a few things to consider. You have looked into weight and cost, but there is also space and time considerations. Volume: Do you have space on your rack to put this? How small does ...


11

I have actually commuted in a very dangerous, hilly, bike un-friendly city (Tegucigalpa, Honduras). Here there are zero facilities for bike commuters, no racks on public transport, no bike parking anywhere and of course, no showers at workplace. I have tackled the problem with following strategies: Leave home with plenty of extra time. When you travel to ...


10

Google maps tries to do this in biking mode to begin with: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/03/biking-directions-added-to-google-maps.html Mapquest is also hill aware to some extent: http://blog.mapquest.com/2011/04/21/cycle-route-planner-aerial-languages/ (I have tried this, but I don't think its particularly great. But I haven't tried it in SF). ...


8

Will you be in Hokkaido? We toured there extensively this summer and cycled through several dozen tunnels: here our findings. They might apply to other parts of Japan. Newest tunnels on big roads have wide side pavements where you can (and possibly are supposed to) cycle. Safety is not an issue but you might have to dismount to make it on the pavement and ...


7

http://ridewithgps.com is the tool my local bike club uses. It doesn't plan routes for you, but had several overlays including Google's bike routes and topo maps. As you plot your route the graph at the bottom shows the altitude and grade. I live in Seattle and find that Ride With GPS works great for finding reasonable routes through the hills.


6

You could use ridewithgps to build your map. It allows you to drag waypoints off the main route and re-routes (can be used without auto routing as well if you prefer). You'll have to pay if you want to print from their site. However, you can print a cue sheet free or export the saved map in GPX or TCX format to print with another application or website ...


6

I mostly use it for tracking rides after the fact, but Ride With GPS has cue sheets and route planning based off of Google maps for their paying members. From the GPS side, it works great, your mileage may vary for pre-planning.


5

It's a year later, but you haven't yet accepted an answer, so this is how I would approach it. Keep in mind that I love bicycling on the road and think bicycling on the Interstate system is a fun and exciting pastime... After looking at your map and spending a little quality time with Street View, my first choice would be the obvious highway route, at least ...


5

The biggest hurdle as I see is the heat. Perhaps you can pack a change of clothes and some wet wipes and a stick of deodorant to change and freshen up. In terms of route it looks like you can avoid the highway by heading south. The bike track near the river looks like it could have some routes through on your bike that may not be accessible to cars. Same ...


5

Just living off that stuff requires your digestive system to adjust, so if you try it you should build it into your diet well in advance, and as a major component. Don't forget to take into account how much extra you need compared to a typical lifestyle. It can't really save you any weight compared to other dehydrated foods, as a gram of carbs is a gram of ...


4

Have a look at http://blog.ch3.gr/ He is an average cyclist who did a UK to Greece ride 3 years ago and has captured all important information in that blog.


4

As you have noted, the problem is slightly more complicated for a bicycle since aerodynamic drag is a larger component. However, one can combine two rules of thumb which are given in these two bicycles.stackexchange answers (How do I calculate power to climb a hill and How many miles of riding are equivalent to one mile of running) to make an estimate of ...


4

Generally speaking, Saturdays and Sundays are quieter than weekdays. The Department of Transport collects various statistics on road use. This table (TRA0307) shows average traffic by time and day of the week. There's also this table (TRA0306) which shows average traffic by day for different road types and different vehicles. Finally, there are statistics ...


4

Good quality road maps will differentiate between paved and unpaved roads. I really like my Gazetteer State Maps


4

Unfortunately, there is single answer to this question. In my experience, every route is unique, and will have variables that increase or decrease the transit time for a particular commute. Traffic, seasonal weather, time of day for the commute, rider's fitness, and bicycle condition will all play a role in determining the time for a given route. If you ...


4

They do not have an app, but I typically use the Course Creator on http://bikeroutetoaster.com/ to plan new rides. It gives you elevation profile and will allow you to print the cue sheets. You can export the GPX/TCX data to upload to a GPS device for on screen turn by turn cues (depending on your device). Another good option for finding new routes is to ...


4

For significant climbs, the VAM ( french? for meters climbed per hour ) is all you need to know. If you know your VAM and the height of the climb, then that's how long the climb will take. Road or MTB, it doesn't vary much in my experience unless the trail requires significant hike-a-bike. Walking speeds just don't vary that much so Naismith's rule ...


4

By day 3 of my first long bicycle tour I realized how much stuff that I thought was essential was not. I ended up shipping stuff home, giving it away, and whatever else I could do. I would recommend that you skip the chair - even if it's lightweight, it's going to take up precious space.


4

Japan has relatively modest vehicle emission regulations - certainly not to EU standards. The worst that I experienced is diesel soot from buses and trucks. Luckily, rural Japan has depopulated to the extent that you can generally route in a way to avoid traffic. As far as tunnels go... For shorter tunnels, there's not much you can do except hold your ...


4

This is how we did it, for all tunnels longer than 150 meters (ranging from 200 meters to 4 km): before the entrance of the tunnel, the leader slows down or even stop, allowing the follower to get closer after entering the tunnel with lights on, regardless if there is a cyclable sidewalk or not, every once in a while the leader ring once his bell if the ...


4

Go to your local bike shops and ask them about group rides, local cycling associations, that sort of thing. If there's not one really "local" to you, find the best one you can find in your part of the state. The ACA runs organized tours that you could join. Obviously money is involved. They may also know of some other resources. There are other tour ...


3

It's scary, for me at least, because the destination is at some big highway with trucks and everything racing at +80 km/h The destination is "Bosques del Poniente". The approach from the north east crosses the "Monterrey-Saltillo" highway. To avoid that, approach from the south: for example via "Robles" and "Benito Juarez". Continuing to work backwards, ...


3

Just very generally speaking: First survey your route for "choke points" -- places like river crossings where you're forced to choose between a limited number of pathways. Pick an overall route that selects the best routes through the choke points. Observe other cyclists, and observe traffic at your likely commute time, and select routes between choke ...


3

For the BRouter-web frontend and BRouter Android application, there is also many script based custom routing profiles that calculate with SRTM based elevation of supposed routes. The fully offline mode, together with LocusMap/OSMAnd/Oruxmaps applications, can be great advantage.


3

https://bikeroll.net shows you a nicely colored altitude profile where you can easily spot out the difficult part of the route.


3

Yes, use strava map builder, and turn on the min elevation option: The only bad thing about the app builder is the app itself is sluggish over time (something wrong with my browser?), but it's no a big deal, since you can always save a route and refresh the page. Also, If I plan a long route, I've found strava heatmap is pretty useful , although popular ...


3

http://brouter.de/brouter-web/ Uses OpenStreetMap which is usually much better than Google Maps for Cycling. There are also 2 distinct bicycle profiles (fastbike and trekking) available and you can customize them.


3

In the UK, Cyclestreet does this. I just tried a route over the Forth Road Bridge, starting and ending on the shore. On the elevation profile you can clearly see that it goes up to 40m (the height of the bridge) and is not projected onto the surface, which would be sea level: Cyclestreet is based in map data from OpenStreetMap, but it is not clear if ...


2

The roading network in the UK is well categorised so understanding what the different categories of roads are will assist you in planning a route: M Roads motorways bicycles are banned from using these. A Roads major roads intended to provide large-scale transport links within or between areas. These are generally dual carriageways and will have ...


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