28

50 miles is feasible but it will be hard work. Think about how tired you felt after cycling 20 miles. Then cycle 20 miles again from that tired start and think about how tired you'll feel then. Then, cycle another ten miles. The other answers give lots of good advice which I won't repeat. Since you mention trains and coming home every week, I assume that ...


9

Anything colder than -55F (-48C) is difficult to mechanically maintain. Most lubrication products on the market for cold weather are rated to -60F (-51C). Which means that at -50F (-45C) they become almost unrideable and at -55F (-48C) pretty much unrideable. I am aware of products rated for colder than that, but they have issues that when stored at room ...


9

It's doable if you are young and fit and don't mind some pain. If you have ridden up to 20 miles, but regularly only ride a few miles, you may find 50 miles is a struggle, just because you are not used to it. On the initial attempts plan to take it easy and build in rest stops. From your 20 mile rides you should have a good idea of the pace you can sustain. ...


7

Consider clothing as well. I commute a short distance daily and rarely do long rides, so proper shorts are not something I bother with. When I've done longer rides, I quickly noticed that as the difference. If there's a seam in the wrong place on your pants, 50 miles is going to make it known to you.


7

First thing that comes to my mind is labour costs. Second thing that comes to mind is that once you break that paint seal by reaming/facing you are allowing contact with the air and elements. As a good practice you should coat the threads with a little grease before assembly, meaning that when you get that new frame, you tap out the mounting holes and ...


7

I regularly ride quite long distances in the UK (SW England, Wales). For 50 miles one large bottle of water is enough for most people even in hot weather (even me and I get thirsty). However you'll probably be going slower as you're new to the distance. I suggest you plan a route that allows you to get off the bike and get something to eat/drink at around ...


5

You have said you're planning on taking: Spare inner tubes, Jet pump, Multi tool kit, Tyre levers, Gel bars, Fluids, Cash & Card So you've covered flat tyres, energy, hydration and money. Other suggested repair items: chain tool, quick links, spoke tool, zip ties, strong tape. Unforeseen circumstances: mobile telephone/cellphone, emergency contact ...


4

If your current max is 20 miles, 50 miles will be painful. Prepare for that, and don't expect to be able to do much directly after your first rides. However, it's totally in the doable range. For the ride itself, I see three important points: If you can, invest into puncture resistant tires. They are worth every penny. Make sure your bike is in good shape ...


3

You could train (your body) for it. I do 50 km regularly (several times per week, it takes me about 2 hours), so the thought of doing 50 miles doesn't scare me, because I know I can do 50 km before breakfast. The most I've done continuously is only 100 km but that wasn't much more tiring than 50 km, it just took a bit more than twice as long. I know it ("...


3

It is important to note that most manufacturer's of quality frames do face and ream their frames before they assemble or ship. They often do it before paint because they do it with machinery to build/assemble their frames, which allow a level of precision which wasn't possible with a locally produced hand built frame. So facing to raw metal isn't necessary ...


2

You have more than enough time, so use it. Start at 25km, increase distance by 10% per week. This would mean just six months to 280km. Key thing is start slowly, don't over do it, because of your time frame, do less not more, if you take time off (more than a couple of weeks), drop back a bit. Plot a line on a calendar - from now at 25km to May next year ...


1

Presuming you are young and reasonably fit, 50 miles is entirely doable - over moderate terrain and at a moderate pace it should take less than 4 hours (edited). The first couple of times you do it will be a struggle, but your fitness will grow fast.. next up you will be doing RAAM :). A bananas and a muesli bar should be sufficient.. but you won't ...


1

I would see a rehabilitation center or certified trainer for exercise for the shoulder. It does not cost that much for 1 or 2 sessions to get a set of exercises. You will need some light weights as fly will be an exercise. I tore a rotator cuff and it was easier for me to ride my mtn as that angle was more comfortable. I could ride after about 2 months ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible