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7

The valve is broken. You need a new inner tube. A new tube will cost $5 to $10, and most bike shops will charge $5 or so to change it for you. It's something you need to be able to do anyway. They'll probably show you if you ask.


6

I think you are correct; there is no technical advantage of Presta. But many things are not used for technical reasons but rather for momentum reasons. Personally I prefer schrader for all my bikes, including my tubeless tires. Any rims drilled for Presta, I simply drill out. I only have presta valves on a couple very narrow rims which I would rather not ...


5

Presta (btw: we call it Sclaverand or simply road bike valve here in Austria) has one advantage: You can easily release air. There could also be some small weight savings and aerodynamic benefits. I also think dirt is less of a problem with Presta (assuming you use both without a valve cap). Even if rims have gotten wide enough to drill holes for both valves:...


4

SKS makes a press-on adapter. Unscrew the valve nut, push the adapter on, use the schraeder head on the air hose, pull the adapter off and thread the valve nut back down. Tell your shop it's p/n PU4001 from Q.


4

Never seen one myself - there are pumps that have push-on "speed" adapters for presta, but they are part of the pump head and you wouldn't find one at the service station. The best fix is to unscrew your valve core and add a small dab of hand-strength threadlocker. The Locktite one is normally blue, but other brands have other colours. Then ...


3

While inertia seems to be the main reason, its not that simple, the bike industry has shown more than ample capability to introduce improvements that are not compatible with older standards. Designers pushed 1x to free up space around the highly crowded bottom bracket on soft tail. 29" rims on MTB proved too weak with standard width hubs, so a wider ...


2

This might not be an intended reason, but it helped me. Having an old road bike, the tyre clearance for 25mm tyres can be very slim. This results in "taller" tyre profiles rubbing against the top of the fork at the valve. When I switched tubes to a valve with lock nut, I found that it "pulled" the tube around the valve towards the rim ...


2

I will complete @Mike Smith's answer, which is correct (in that your valve is indeed broken) but does not explain why you can find videos which explain how to repair a presta valve. First of, although it is most likely to be a presta valve, it can actually be a Regina (a.k.a. Italian) valve, which actually look like broken presta. You can see picture of such ...


2

Harshikerfuffle, I believe you mean to ask what is the best way to attach the presta valve to the pump. All pumps are a little bit different. Some of them you insert and pull the lever up to lock the valve in place, some are the opposite, and you push the lever down. I have a compact pump that you screw into place, and on my air compressor, the presta ...


1

I put one inside and outside after having a few failures of the valve stem tube connection point. It appeared that the stem was being pulled away from the tube Now months of use later no issues


1

Not using that ring may save you some time when replacing the tube. Not using that ring may work out expensive. I recently saw a video with a damage report on a velomobile, where the accident happened because the rear tire did blow out. The relevant part of this video starts around 12 minutes in. The tire did blow out because the valve had gotten pushed in ...


1

If you press down while screwing in, air will be released. The nut on the top of the Presta valve does not need any downward force to close. If you are not pressing down while screwing in or find a lot of force is needed to turn the nut at the top of the tube, then your valve may be damaged. At that point, it is best to get a new inner tube/valve.


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