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48

If it's actually used, as in previously owned with real mileage, they should have disclosed that. If it's in new condition, or new condition with some amount of the discount being for shop wear or due to being a low-mileage return, then I would say there's nothing disingenuous about omitting the manufacture date unless asked directly. For better or for ...


44

I commute by bike around 8,000-10,000 km per year and based on my book keeping it is at about 1/5th (or less) the cost of running a car. After accounting for paying for the bike (i.e., devaluation) and maintenance (e.g., consumables such as chains, tires, etc), and under the working assumption that I will sell and buy a new bike in 5 years time. I projected ...


20

There are many causes for price difference in bikes. There are others reasons than these listed below, but they tend to fall in line with one of these four categories. Brand Branding is always a premium. As in every industry I can think of, some brands have a reputation that to some extent justifies a premium price. This reputation is based off a multitude ...


14

As stated in the comments, your main sport is a strength sport, so I assume you are looking for a bicycle to commute or to do some light aerobics on. It's not clear which store you shopped in. There is a wide range of price points including many much lower than your stated range. US$5k will get you a mid- to high-end performance-oriented bicycle. Here, I use ...


14

Some example from Austria and Germany for new bikes: ~300€ will get you a cheap city/trekking bicycle with the cheapest components and 3x7speed gears. Often not assembled properly, low quality and heavy. ~600€ will get you a solid brand-name city/trekking bike or cheap MTB. ~900€ is where real road bikes and MTBs start. >1300€ here you get good aluminium ...


12

They do. Connex (Wipperman) sells bulk chain, as shown by this link, and these people also buy it by the spool. This is likely what bike manufacturers do, and I've seen it in a bike shop or two. I'm sure you can also get it at some place like McMaster-Carr or Grainger if you ask for ANSI #40 roller chain with the appropriate width (possibly by special order)....


11

I'm trying to put myself into your shoes if this were to happen to me with the LBS that I frequent. I own two bikes, which almost sounds like the start of an inverse Twelve Step Program--one that increases one's bike purchases. My Kona Dew is a 2007 that I bought in mid 2008. That was a different LBS from the one I frequent now. Nothing wrong with the ...


11

TL;DNR - Bikes are so expensive because people are prepared to pay that much. Pricing of the product is a balance of the cost to supply and value add to the customer. In the perfect capitalist's world, a product is produced for nothing and sold for as much as each individual customer is prepared to pay. In (arguably disproven) theory, competition will drive ...


10

I would be very careful with a deal that sounds too good to be true. Take a look at what happend to this carbon wheel in another question: Carbon Wheel Heat Bending I wouldn't buy from a company I've never heard of before and will never hear from again (like when the wheel deforms from the heat of braking and I'm trying to get a refund). Even the tagline ...


10

Spending $30 / month at your LBS seems perfectly reasonable. Your LBS is grateful you buy from them instead of from Amazon. If you sometimes go to your bike store just to talk, that probably OK, as long as you are not distracting any staff from real work or keeping them from serving customers who are paying. Either they actually like chatting with you or ...


10

To use car sales analogy. If you go to a Ferrari or Lamborghini dealership, all you'll see are cars for $1 million or more. If you go to a used car dealership, you'll find quite different cars for $5000 or less (I actually have no idea how much cars cost in USA). If you want to settle on something middle range, you can find something at just about any price ...


8

The answer is "it varies wildly". By the far largest cost is the initial price of the bike, which in itself has a huge range and is multiplied by how often you replace the bike. The second largest cost is maintenance, which may also cost premium or you can do it yourself. For road and city riding with sensible part choices, the cost of wearing parts is ...


7

1) "am I freeloading, or am I a (financially) valued customer?" Depends. Most bike shops I've been to are happy with giving some of advice -- helping the person find the right part and them do it themselves, since thats how a lot of bike upkeep is done. Of course, doing this too much can annoy people and also choice of timing -- if the shop is just sitting ...


6

I dont know if there is any pre-existing data but here is mine. biking: bike: ~$750 (based on what i paid for my Trek 1.1) assuming you pop one tube every 700miles and your daily commute is ~10miles one way so 20miles a day thats 35days in between replacement tubes so ~10 tubes a year. ~$7 per tube (700c x 18-25mm - 42mm Presta) x ~10 tubes = ~$70 on tubes ...


6

If the model numbers are the same, they will be the same parts built to the same specs. Of course, there are production line variations. If there are slight variations in the model numbers, they may be the same or they may be slightly different (typically slightly cheaper) to prevent exact comparison to the regular part as Daniel R. Hicks said in a comment....


6

If you know the model and exact year Bicycle Blue Book is a good place to start. This is a link to all the models for Peugeot: http://www.bicyclebluebook.com/BicycleDatabase.aspx?make=718


6

Totally depends on the person and how much you're willing to lose. One of the main things you want to do is lock properly -- an expensive lock used poorly isn't very good. And you usually just have to be harder to break than the competition. For U-locks, you can take out even higher quality ones relatively easy if there is a lot of room left in the lock by ...


6

I would use bicycle blue book as a way to figure out the change in value of the bike. They have a system to estimate the resale value of used bikes. Your bikes condition at the end of the year will matter so keep it clean and lubed.


5

You could: measure the chain stretch sight if the chainrings and cogs are worn out check the wear of the tires remove the seatpost and peak inside the frame for rust pull the brakes and inspect closely the cables for rust check the wheels for trueness measure the weight of the bike with an electronic scale rock the handlebars gently to check for drag in the ...


5

That bike is much older than 10 years. Probably somewhere in the '80s The bike pictured below is quite similar to yours, and was built in 1985. [Source: Peugeot 1985 product folder] Note however that these frames are generally of good quality, and if not terribly rusty can be used for many more years (and of course are very cool and retro looking). These ...


5

This is sooooooooooo wide open. You lose like 1/3 rolling it out the door. Condition matters more than years. If it 10 years old with some out of date components that matters. But 3 versus 5 does not matter. I buy used nice bikes and never pay more than 1/3 retail. Sometimes you can get a new bike for 80% retail at end of season. I could sell every ...


4

I've done exactly this - having broken an old MTB frame after 2500 km on it, I decided to buy a road bike. Searching and researching and browsing suggested 105 level components would be a good floor, and I had a preference for a disc brake on the front. Pricing worked out around $2200 NZD for an aluminium and about $2500 for the same thing in carbon. ...


4

Based on some digging around in academic archives, there has been no systematic study like you are suggesting. That said, bicycling is several orders of magnitude cheaper than driving a vehicle on a yearly measure, rather than a distance measure. Some interesting points, the average length of a car trip is about 9 miles and about 42% of car trips are shorter ...


4

piggybacking on Criggie's comment... What is a good ratio, in prices, between your bike and your lock so that it would be reasonable? Well, sometimes the level of bicycle theft is rather unreasonable. The amount of time you will leave the bike locked, and where you will leave it locked are also variables. I get around Santiago de Chile with a $10 bike ...


4

It may be helpful to know that according to the NBDA*, most bike shops actually lose money on bike sales. The average profit margin is -3%. Where the profit margin on parts and accessories is +7.5%. Although the report doesn't share the profit margin for service, my rough calculations say it is about 4.5%. So, I agree with @Argenti Apparatus. Hope ...


3

As other people said this is difficult to answer within the subjective field of "decent" "good quality", etc. There are two main components to the price of bike(part)s: Weight (lighter is generaly more expensize) Quality (which is a catch-all phrase for durability, the technical sophistication needed to make a part, complexity of the part, extra effort ...


3

Good answer from Kibbee +1 I just have a bit more to add Yes a CX makes an excellent commuter. It is stable and yet is efficient on the road. You just swap out the tires. I have purchased 2 used CX bikes. This is the end of CX season so you find some good used values. High end bikes are the best values as those are the people churning bikes but they ...


3

Cyclocross is a type of bike race, which means that most true cyclocross bikes will be expensive, as they are built to win races. You won't find much for that price range if you buy new. But racers are always looking to go faster and get new gear, so consider getting a used bike. You should be able to find a very good used bike for that price. Also consider ...


3

Silence... I've found this works in most negotiations. Ask a direct but open question like "what's the deal with discounts on this bike" and then just wait until the other person fills the silence. Even when it feels like they've finished talking, if they haven't really answered your question stay quiet and don't make confirming sounds. They will almost ...


3

What kind of discount should I be offering to compensate for the lack of wheels? If I still had the wheels, I'd be expecting to get £250 to £300, judging by completed eBay listings. It depends on how much the wheels are worth as part of the bike, but it wouldn't be surprising if you weren't able to sell it at (bike with wheels) - (cost of wheels). I'd ...


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