24

Any bike with a comfortable seat, upright riding position and low ratio gears. This is pretty much the definition of a 'cruiser' style bike. Many hybrids, less expensive mountain bikes and fatbikes would fit the requirement too.


22

I'd go for the air-horn, for example the AirZound. It is my opinion that screaming and yelling (the primal scream) can cause a lot of unnecessary social distress, and is not a good alterntive for traffic communication and signalling under normal conditions. It ends up being more effective when you're in "panic" as said, which is barely a day-by-day ...


18

Screaming is faster and much more effective: I suspect it's usually best. Or use an electric horn or air horn. About screaming: The BHSI writes as follows. We don't find that horns do much for safety on a bicycle. Your voice is faster to react and adapts better to different situations. The primal scream produces good adrenalin-based reactions in ...


16

For practical day to day commuting I would stay away from a fixie because: You are not a very experienced cyclist, riding a fixie in traffic is actually not that easy. No fenders, so dirty clothes/mud in the face on rainy days. No rear-rack, so for luggage you are forced to use a backpack. I also wouldn't go for the type of urban bike you link because: ...


15

Flat pedals are great for lots of reasons, but I won't get into the virtues or pitfalls of platforms versus toe clips versus clipless systems (though I am a big fan of plain old platform pedals.) I will try to give information pertaining to the different styles and a few examples rather than an exhaustive list of specific brands and prices. There are lots ...


13

Firstly, 11 or 12 mph isn't that slow, especially if you're still working on improving your fitness. Try measuring speed in kph instead of mph, as it feels better. You can laugh, but we all do it! The main thing you should look for in a new bike, IMO is that it fits you. This will improve your comfort. If you're comfortable you'll be able to go faster. Drop ...


10

You could consider a 3-wheeled recumbent bicycle: Photo courtesy of Willeke These tend to be more comfortable, and the three wheels mean balance is not an issue, so you can go slowly or stop altogether without any balance issues. (Note that there are also two-wheeled recumbents, but they would probably not serve your purposes as well.)


8

Don't know about India, but assembling from parts in my end of the world costs a lot more than a new bike. I know of many instances where people buy a "donor" bike for good new parts at a reasonable price. If you can get parts at the right price, it may be worth it, but problems with compatibility between components can lead to a lot of blood, sweat and ...


8

Just like cars, things change between model years. Sometimes they spec up the bikes and sometimes they spec them down even with the same model number. And sometimes its for profit margin reasons or to improve sales next to competitors. In this case, for example, the main differences between the same bike in 2 model years are a slight geometry change, a ...


7

Markijbema's comment on the original question touched on one aspect that nobody has mentioned: "A seat is easier to combine with a typical dutch bike, which is less race-y than the crazy bikes people in other countries seem to use for daily use" The construction and design of the bicycle determines how well it handles a load, either over the rear wheel, ...


7

Personally, I think that good cycling helmets are beautiful. The lines are elegant. The transitions between the surface of the helmet and the vents are graceful. The way that the helmet increases in size from front to back is reminiscent of the wind. They're really quite astounding pieces of technology, if you really look at them. On the other hand, cheap ...


7

It sounds like you need something like a handlebar bag or a rack trunk like these: rack trunk handlebar bag The rack trunk would require adding either a seatpost mounted rack or a full rear rack. Either one would allow you to move to panniers in the future if you needed to carry more goods like a laptop or a change of clothes, but a full rack would be ...


7

You could try something with slightly less coverage like the sks raceblades. However, the sks commuter fenders have less clearance in the back. It still might be too much though. Clip on fenders like the portland design work soda pop fenders may be an option for you as well, but they provide less coverage overall. Fenders are one of those things that are ...


7

I have noticed that shouting (whatever words you use) is often taken personally by the drivers. It's probably the most effective and quickest to use in an emergency as described. I've seen several cyclists with a football whistle on a lanyard round the neck (mine is on my helmet strap) that can be held loosly between the teeth.


7

A 10K commute is pretty short, I would say almost too short for a racing style bike for several reasons. I would recommend you look at tourer or hybrid bikes. Allow me to explain. You say you are not really interested in comfort. I assume you will ride in your regular clothes. This is a bad combination. When done regularly, no matter the amount of ...


7

Given the added details in the question, I'd probably agree with @tommy_o's answer and @armb's comment, but would also say this: It sounds like you do not currently ride and are looking to start. If this is the case, I wouldn't be tempted to spend too much money first time around. Obviously you need to spend enough to be comfortable that what you buy is ...


7

The terms "performance bike" and "endurance bike" aren't very well defined. To many people, the term "endurance bike" describes touring bicycles, which are used for long-distance self-supported rides where you're carrying a lot of equipment and supplies. However, Fuji (which you referred to), uses the term "endurance bike" to mean a road bike with a more ...


7

I want to use the bicycle for the 26-30mi commute that I do everyday and if it is a racing bike it could potentially save time A trained cyclist can definitely ride farther and faster on a road bike than on a hybrid bike, based solely on wind resistance and bicycle fit. However, the speeds you list are completely unrealistic. Bike speeds are based primarily ...


7

You might have a bit more luck doing things the other way around - go to the Sold Secure web site and read off a list of compliant locks. When I was buying, I took this approach, chose the locks and then bought them online. Also, bear in mind that Sold Secure originated in the UK, so possibly lock manufacturers who sell mostly outside of the UK market might ...


7

You should ask the seller for all the information you need about the bike, because a) they should know more than we do and b) if they can't give it to you readily then there is more risk that it is stolen. These things do happen! Don't tell the seller this, but the name is usually written on the frame. If they can't manage that much then consider walking ...


6

I did some research on this issue and ended up going with a trailer for my two-year old son. We use it for our daily commute to day care and work, and so far it seems comfortable for him, and easy for me to handle. Cars give us plenty of space. My one issue is the amount of time it takes me to get the trailer out of its storage shed, lock up the shed, ...


6

There no bike on the market that is very good at folding and also very good at “biking”! So you have to decide if you care most about the folding or how well it works as a bike. For a bike to fold into a small space it must have small wheels. Small wheels are never as good a ride as full sized wheels. The Brompton is consider to be one of the best ...


6

At your level all brands are equal and you can find a suitable bike for yourself in almost all brands. Focusing on a specific brand will only make it easier for you to choose but don't, for one second, believe that you've found a better brand than others. I suggest visiting a couple of LBSes (local bike shops) to get more info and test ride a couple of ...


6

I have bought my last few shorts by direct experimentation at stores, and had the same doubts as yours. Mostly, what has worked is: you dress the shorts, and stand right up with feet in the normal position. In this position, the shorts should not produce a "bulk" between the thighs. Shorts that produce the bulk tend to be too uncomfortable either while on ...


6

I think it was downright irresponsible of the shop to sell you a bike that so obviously doesn't fit you. They should have done at least some basic fit testing, which clearly they did not. The trouble is, you're at their mercy now. Since it's not a warranty issue, they're not obligated to exchange it. So I would be very polite in how I asked, and I'd make ...


6

Guy Martin is obviously a decent cyclist, but you should note that his record-breaking ride occurred under very special conditions. For starters, he built his own frame (or rather Jason Rourke built it for him). Next, he chose exactly where the run would take place - on sand flats. And not least he was towed in order to get up towards top speed, which ...


6

This is a monster question, I'll attempt to address some of it below. I'm sorry if I miss some of your points, but you'll appreciate it is quite difficult to pick them all out. Hopefully you'll find the things I do address vaguely helpful. First of all it is not at all an insane idea, in fact it sounds like a superb idea if one of your goals is fitness. I'd ...


6

A bicycle in and of itself is a half of the equation. If you want to eek out as much speed as you can you also need to consider how you interact with the machine. This answer focuses on the human/bike interaction rather tweaking bike specs. Bike fit is a continual compromise between power, comfort, and aerodynamics (Bike Fit by Phil Burke). Simply ...


6

Option 1 - Nothing Many fixed gear riders are short distance, and tend to be close to home. The creed is to remove superfluous things from the bike making it lighter and simpler. Why carry tools at all? All you need is a cellphone, or some way to pay for taxi. Some tyres have a phenomenal puncture resistance, so this makes punctures less likely, at the ...


6

All of those bikes would be fine, at least for a while. You can find pictures of board carriers on all those bikes. The problem is that salt water destroys bikes. It's why beach cruisers are as cheap and simple as possible, if they actually get used by the ocean they will either require washing or rust out in a year or so. A Fat bike would be a really ...


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