33

I've had both. A really nice trailer and a child bike seat -- where the child sits between the rider and the handlebar (like this WeeRide Kangaroo Child Bike Seat). My daughter was ok with the trailer, but absolutely preferred the seat. I found with the seat in front of me, the weight didn't affect me almost at all, and if the bike was going to fall, I'd ...


24

Any bike with a comfortable seat, upright riding position and low ratio gears. This is pretty much the definition of a 'cruiser' style bike. Many hybrids, less expensive mountain bikes and fatbikes would fit the requirement too.


22

Some years ago, Bicycling magazine did a shootout on available locks and the Kryptonite "New York Chain" came out on top. Unfortunately, it weighs more than many bikes and is not easy to carry either. Fine if you can leave it where you lock your bike. I'm with the police department at a major university, and we have a program through Kryptonite where we ...


22

I'd go for the air-horn, for example the AirZound. It is my opinion that screaming and yelling (the primal scream) can cause a lot of unnecessary social distress, and is not a good alterntive for traffic communication and signalling under normal conditions. It ends up being more effective when you're in "panic" as said, which is barely a day-by-day ...


21

I would never use anything but a trailer for safety reasons alone. The amount of force which can be applied to a small child's head from a fall from a bike seat can cause a severe injury. Even as an adult riding carefully on a bike path I've had an accident (dog running in front of me). With a trailer it is nearly impossible to flip or cause other blunt ...


20

We live in the country, and ride on gravel roads pretty much exclusively. We used a trailer for years and have kept it even though the kids outgrew it long ago. It remains useful years later when the kid(s) are riding solo. Our trailer is over 20 years old and we used it just last week, riding out to pick up our CSA veggies, which probably weighed more than ...


19

I'll not speak for the trailer, so much as against the rear child bike seat. My sister, was at 2 years old, riding in a high quality, bike shop sold and properly mounted bike seat. She was strapped in, and all was well. My dad was the captain of the vessel, and they were having a grand time. My dad hit a broken bottle on the road. Never saw it, he said. ...


18

Screaming is faster and much more effective: I suspect it's usually best. Or use an electric horn or air horn. About screaming: The BHSI writes as follows. We don't find that horns do much for safety on a bicycle. Your voice is faster to react and adapts better to different situations. The primal scream produces good adrenalin-based reactions in ...


15

For practical day to day commuting I would stay away from a fixie because: You are not a very experienced cyclist, riding a fixie in traffic is actually not that easy. No fenders, so dirty clothes/mud in the face on rainy days. No rear-rack, so for luggage you are forced to use a backpack. I also wouldn't go for the type of urban bike you link because: ...


15

Flat pedals are great for lots of reasons, but I won't get into the virtues or pitfalls of platforms versus toe clips versus clipless systems (though I am a big fan of plain old platform pedals.) I will try to give information pertaining to the different styles and a few examples rather than an exhaustive list of specific brands and prices. There are lots ...


13

To keep your chain from breaking, keep the derailers properly aligned, ease off of pedaling when you shift, and don't "stomp" on the chain when it's not fully in gear. (Folks who don't go back to the non-indexed days probably never got into the habit of coasting while shifting, but it wouldn't be a bad thing to practice a bit.) Broken chains are ...


13

Firstly, 11 or 12 mph isn't that slow, especially if you're still working on improving your fitness. Try measuring speed in kph instead of mph, as it feels better. You can laugh, but we all do it! The main thing you should look for in a new bike, IMO is that it fits you. This will improve your comfort. If you're comfortable you'll be able to go faster. Drop ...


11

A cyclocross bike which can accomodate fenders and a rack could be an option. I personally use an aluminum framed Cannondale CAADX Tiagra on my 17 mile (one way) commute and I like its versatility. It is relatively light (21 lbs) and has eyelets to accommodate fenders and a rack. It can also be fitted with a variety of tires ranging from slicks to studded. ...


11

Speaking as a parent and a former 3 year old, I'd advise against the rear bike seat. When I was 3, my mom bought one of those and popped me on it. We were out riding for a long time and I wanted to stop, so... I jammed my foot into the rear wheel. That was a REALLY bad idea. Lesson learned: don't stick foot in bike wheels. Now that I'm a parent myself, I ...


11

I've used both and prefer the trailer. Weatherproof, able to be swapped from one bike to another easily, able to be used on my good racer and mountain bike that would never fit a seat rack and a much lower center of gravity, you almost don't notice it's there while the child seat makes the bike less stable. Plus you can also fit a picnic bag our shopping in ...


11

I use both (we have an 18 month year old and a 3 year old). The trailer for going riding on tracks, small roads and old disused railways at the weekends, the seat for taking the older one to nursery on 'bigger' roads. The trailer is fun for both of them, plus they can sleep in it, and we can cover a bit of distance - the seat is probably more comfortable ...


11

Consider at least one alternative to your (seemingly binary) choice - trike with frontal bay: Cargo bike makers carry high hopes or their more attractive cousin Kangaroobike by Winther I'm sure there are similar ones available in your locality so you don't have to consider complex logistics to get them from Denmark or even immigration to .dk in the ...


11

If you don't want to spend lots of money you can still get the most relevant characteristics in a pair of safety glasses. You can find these at just about any hardware store and they: wrap around, are impact resistant, block UV, don't look half bad come in clear and tinted (and are cheap enough to get one of each usually)


11

My usual answer to the question of "What sort of new bike should a (relatively speaking) novice cyclist get" is "used". Better to ride a year or two on a moderately priced used bike than to drop a bundle on the WRONG new bike. (Nothing wrong with your "light mountain bike", BTW, other than you'd want smoother tires, the suspension may be too soft, and ...


10

I know that you can buy lots of things online and that prices are competitive online, however, you do need to know exactly what you are buying, and, given that you have posted this question here, you might not be there yet... Please visit your local bike shop, explain to the sales staff what you are looking for, what distance you are having to put in, ...


10

You could consider a 3-wheeled recumbent bicycle: Photo courtesy of Willeke These tend to be more comfortable, and the three wheels mean balance is not an issue, so you can go slowly or stop altogether without any balance issues. (Note that there are also two-wheeled recumbents, but they would probably not serve your purposes as well.)


9

I have wrestled with this issue for a long time. After commuting on a Trek FX Hybrid and moving to a Masi Speciale CX Cyclocross bike I am convinced now that Cyclocross bikes make the best commuters. They are built for speed - Let's face it bikes are slower than cars. So when you are out there you want to save as much time as you can. Speed helps. They have ...


8

I've got this one. http://www.abus-bordo.com/html_en/bikelock_bordo_lite.html It's heavy, but very strong. Unlike U-locks, it is easy to carry on the bike. Update : video showing operation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57zc9kregqs&feature=related Pretty simple : unfold like an accordion, wrap around frame, front wheel, and some "urban furniture", ...


8

Although this should be a given, ride the bike before you buy it. Not for 5 minutes in a parking lot, but for a real, decent ride. Any shop specializing in 'bents will understand that if you are making your first recumbent purchase, it's a leap of faith, and will be accommodating. That is also a reason to buy your recumbent from a specialty shop. Credit for ...


8

Transition lenses! After riding for years with various sunnies and cycling glasses with interchangeable lenses I got sick of having to carry around multiple lenses and changing them during the ride. Recently, I got a pair of Oakley Fives with transition lenses. They are brilliant. No more need for changing lenses, they are always the right level of shading ...


8

Don't know about India, but assembling from parts in my end of the world costs a lot more than a new bike. I know of many instances where people buy a "donor" bike for good new parts at a reasonable price. If you can get parts at the right price, it may be worth it, but problems with compatibility between components can lead to a lot of blood, sweat and ...


8

Just like cars, things change between model years. Sometimes they spec up the bikes and sometimes they spec them down even with the same model number. And sometimes its for profit margin reasons or to improve sales next to competitors. In this case, for example, the main differences between the same bike in 2 model years are a slight geometry change, a ...


7

Having used them both, I say they are useful in different contexts. The bike seat I have is someting like this: combined with a dress guard like this: I have no fear for small feet getting stuck. The seat is much faster when you just want to pop over to get some milk and such, but its limiting when bringing more then one child with you or have more goods ...


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