20

"Ghost ride": Borrow a good bike (if needed). Ride on the good bike, while pulling the incomplete one alongside you by holding its stem. Your secondary hand sits on the second bike's stem and pulls it along as you ride slowly. It may sound silly, but I had to do it once and I was impressed with how well it worked. One way to look at it: it's not ...


16

This is how I did it once: Needed three straps. Two of them where used to improvise shoulder straps so I carried the bike simulating a backpack. The third strap was to stabilize the handlebar so it and the fork where fixed in one position and not swinging uncontrollably. If I were to do it again, I'd prepare myself to remove pedals and carry a thick blanket ...


11

If you have only the one bike, and no other transport, then you're going to be walking. If the bike has working wheels then it can roll and all you do is hold it by the stem while walking. Mind out for the pedal nearest you, it tends to clip you in the ankle. Some people do this with one hand on the saddle, controlling direction in the same way as riding ...


6

With other items sliding around I'd suggest a case where you don't need to take the bike fully apart to pack it. I think there are some you can just take the front wheel off of and pack it. If you can't do something like that you could use bungie cords to secure it and go to the hardware store and get some foam padding to put around the frame and drivetrain. ...


5

Hire a car. In many locations, you can hire a van taxi, or request a large-size vehicle from a car hire service like Uber or Lyft. Either of these should have more than enough space to store a fully assembled bicycle and one passenger. This will almost certainly be the fastest and easiest method, although it'll cost more than some other options. I can't ...


5

It's really not that complicated. Seat meet head. And before you say that's too heavy, in India guys carry motorcycles on their heads up ladders all the time.


4

If there is public transport connecting your start and destination points, you are likely to be able (and to be allowed) to travel with your baggage. A regular disassembled bicycle is such a baggage. It is rather bulky (resulting dimensions are defined by the diamond shaped frame) and heavy, but not outrageously out of reasonable limits. There are usually ...


3

Germany Local trains On Deutsche Bahn, local trains ("Nahverkehrszüge") usually carry bikes. Many trains have special open areas for big objects like prams, bicycles and wheelchairs ("Mehrzweckabteil"); in others bicycles may be put into the corridors. Sometimes bikes are not allowed during peak times, like weekday morning and afternoon; this depends on ...


3

New York City You may bring your bike on the subway at all times (though it's quite rude to do it at rush hour). You may bring your train on the commuter railroads during off-peak times. However, Metro-North and the Long Island Railroad (LIRR) each require a bicycle permit which costs $5 and has lifetime validity (for the life of the paper it's printed on,...


2

Spain Bikes can go on all trains except the high-speed trains (though I've heard of exceptions to the latter). Update: since 2015, bikes are officially allowed on the Renfe highspeed trains for free if they're packed up in a bag and no more than 120cm x 90cm x 40cm. Some trains may have a luggage van and then they'll want you to put it in the luggage van, ...


2

Japan JR East trains No JR East trains allow unpacked bikes, but folded or packed bicycles (in bags) are usually fine, no additional fee required. Trains tend to be packed, so placing a bicycle in the very end of a frontmost or rearmost car is least troublesome. From the observation, JR Takasaki line is the least strict and an unpacked bicycle can be taken ...


2

I just tried my new large-size cruiser bicycle on the bus yesterday and the front wheel fender wasn't damaged, but buses constantly transmit forces in varying directions from bumps, potholes, turns, accelerations, decelerations and braking, so my concern is regular use of the bus racks over time. There's also a problem with the bike's back fender but it has ...


2

Latvia Inland intercity trains 🚆 Bicycles are allowed on inland intercity trains operated by Pasažieru vilciens (inland railway public transport service provider) for a fee which amounts to a baggage ticket. Bicycles should be placed in bicycle holders, if a railway wagon is fitted with such holders. Railway wagons with bike holders are marked with a ...


2

Switzerland Generally: if there is space you are mostly/often allowed to bring your bike on the bus/train/tram. You are however expected to pay for it (generally a half-fare, the same kids pay). "Long distance" ;) trains ("Intercity") You're allowed to bring bikes, but only in designated wagons which have a special bike compartment. Most ...


2

It turns out that Focus Transit actually goes between DC and Philly still. The guy on the other end of the phone didn't know what he was talking about when I called. They take bikes.


2

You do not need to transport four wheels anywhere for someone to help you swap them. You can do it yourself. Taking and putting wheels off and on is a part of basic puncture maintenance. You should learn how to do it yourself anyway. After that, your problem of having "2 wheels and a full bicycle" gets reduced to "full bicycle", which you ...


1

If you, or someone in your family, have a big suitcase you can likely fit your bike into the suitcase. Wrap the bike (and certainly the chain) well, if you want to use the case again. Like with the cases mentioned in the other answers, you may have to take off the wheels to fit the frame in. But then you can add the wheels into the same case, wrapped into ...


1

I have once taken a boxed bike on a train from Bath to London airport. There wasn't really any space to put it somewhere, so I just put it upright next to one of the entrances and stood next to it for the ride. It wasn't a problem and noone complained about it. However, I also didn't ask anyone if it is legal or not.


1

I have two folders that I use regularly. I have a Raleigh Twenty that I upgraded with a 5 speed SRAM IGH, and a Bike Friday NWT with a SRAM Dual Drive. I use the Twenty as my "dirt" bike; for local errands on the dirt roads in my community. The NWT is my flyer and goes along with me on trips in it's suitcase. The Twenty cost me $40 on Craigslist. I ...


1

Bangalore, India Regular buses do not allow cycles, especially since the door is too small to take it through. Ac-buses are supposed to allow you to take your cycle. You will be charged an extra 'luggage' fee which keeps changing so I shan't bother mentioning it. However, during peak times conductors will often disallow you due to lack of space. If you want ...


1

SLC to Provo Areas in Utah The buses in this area generally have front-mounted bike racks, very similar to those pictured in other posts. They can handle 2 or 3 bikes. If the rack is full, a driver of an underloaded may allow a bike onto the bus, but this is at their discretion. The larger trains (FrontRunner) generally have a bike-specific car. Riders ...


1

Austin TX USA Austin buses have a fold-down rack in front that can accommodate two bikes. MetroRail (a commuter line) can accommodate eight bikes per car. Some MetroRail stops also have bike lockups.


1

UK Trains Virgin Trains accept bikes, however you must reserve a space first. You can book at the station ticket office at least 15 minutes before the train arrives, or over the phone [0344 556 5659, Option 1] at least 60 mins. before (as you have to wait for the system to update and then collect your reservations from a self-service machine). You can ...


1

New Jersey Transit (New Jersey/New York) Paraphrased/quoted from here. Trains: Folding bikes are usually allowed. Standard-frame bicycles are permitted on many NJ TRANSIT trains as described below: On weekdays - Bicycles are permitted on all weekday trains on all lines except inbound trains that end in Hoboken, Newark or New York between 6 a.m. and ...


1

RTP area of North Carolina, USA Most of the buses that I've seen in RTP area of North Carolina seem to have them. I've carried my bike on the Raleigh Durham Express bus several times.


1

Cleveland, Ohio All buses have racks for 2-3 bikes. The RTA (trains) permit bikes, based on operator discretion. http://www.riderta.com/racknroll


1

Urbana/Champaign/(Parts of) Savoy, Illinois, USA The Champaign-Urbana Mass Transit District has almost all buses which can take 2 bikes in the front. The rules are here.


1

Baltimore, Maryland Bicycles are permitted on the light rail and the metro, except if it's very crowded - which generally corresponds with when there is an Orioles or Ravens game happening. Almost every light rail, metro, and MARC stop has bike racks at the stop. MTA buses have racks that can fit 2 bikes. A bicycle is not allowed on board. MARC trains ...


1

Dresden, Germany Public transport is great for bikes here. You can take your bike on any bus, train, or tram. However, you do have to purchase a concession ticket for the bike.


1

Dayton, Ohio RTA in Dayton and surrounding communities have bike racks on the front of the busses. However, they only hold 2 bikes and require the rider to fold and unfold the rack as needed. However, with the Miami Valley Bike Trails and the spirit of the Wright Brothers, you don't really need RTA to get to most places.


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