26

Though there no doubt are "puncture-resistant" tires that seek to accomplish that end by means of extra-thick rubber, for the past 15-20 years the standard for puncture resistance has been Kevlar belted tires, which look and ride like ordinary tires and weight essentially the same as ordinary tires (maybe a few grams more). The Kevlar belt under the tread ...


24

That looks like the sort of hole you get from tiny bits of glass working their way through the tyre, then slowly cutting into the tube. I'd check the outside of the tyre for tiny cuts, and the inside for barely-detectable points poking through. This photo shows the sort of small cuts I'm talking about: Each of those had a little bit of glass or something ...


22

The back wheel is the wheel bearing most of the weight and also the wheel providing the driving force. For these 2 reasons it is likely that the forces being exerted between the wheel and surface are much greater on the rear wheel than on the front. This makes it more likely that you will get punctures on the rear wheel than the front - all other things ...


22

There are three approaches you can use in combination. Preparation Tough tires - people have their favorite puncture-proof tires. Kevlar reinforced tires work pretty well. Hard tires - pump your tires to close to the maximum pressure written on the side wall. This definitely reduces punctures, and can be combined with puncture-proof tires. At the time ...


22

Do whatever works, really. The problem with the container of water approach is that it requires a container of water. It won't damage the tube. Also, if you need to patch the tube, you have to wait for the wet tube to dry. So, I'd generally recommend doing this last (usually leaks are not subtle enough to need the immersion), but no harm going there first. ...


21

You are correct that the type of puncture you're getting is caused by the rim "pinching" the inner tube. The root cause here is one of the following: pressure too low (most likely) You're not avoiding potholes carefully enough Weight is too high for the tires/terrain. This has nothing to do with fixies except perhaps that people on fixies tend to ...


19

In my experience: You only need to apply a drop of glue a bit larger than a pea (about 7mm diameter) per patch; Glue inside eventually dries. If you only have a puncture once a year, most probably the glue remaining from the last puncture would be dry "no matter what". Also, there is an expiration date of around two years, but I think it's two years if you ...


17

To follow up on what Batman says, what you use to find the leak depends a lot on the circumstances. If you get a flat by the side of the road (and you don't have a spare tube) then you obviously can't use the tub of water (unless you find a convenient pothole filled with rainwater). In other circumstances the water tub (or bathroom sink or whatever) is ...


17

I see three possibilities: Your tire pressure is too low and you are getting pinch flats. As a reference point, with 25mm wide tires and your 74kg weight I’d use at least 6bars (600 kPa) of pressure, better 6.5 or 7. Refill every week or so. Usually with pinch flats you’ll have two holes in opposing sides of the tube, like a snake bite (hence why they are ...


16

From personal experience, I'd say a larger-than-usual hole in the tire could have these undesireable side-effects: The tube might get a bit exposed, and the day-to-day rolling over the hole might wear it down until the tire eventually flats out. Chemical aggresion from road grime or mud could also be involved. The fabric of the tire might get damaged to the ...


16

Sometimes it can be hard to find a small hole. Sometimes it helps to mix water and dish soap together and either pour that over the partially inflated tire, scanning for leaks or submerging the tire in a bucket of soapy water. The soap will bubble and make holes more apparent. You also probably want to immerse the valve to see if the leak may be ...


16

This kind of failure is basically the reason sticker-type patches have a reputation for not being reliable. Scrupulously sanding the area and getting it as clean as possible (ie, with alcohol or other residue-free solvent, cleaner than anyone can probably get it on the side of the road) wards off the problem but doesn't eliminate it. Sticker type patches ...


15

Thin tires do get punctured more easily. They also require that you fill them up more often, as they have a smaller volume of air, and at a much higher pressure, and therefore more quickly drop to a non-optimal pressure. Also, narrow tires will not be able to absorb as much impact as a wider mountain bike style tire, and therefore potholes and other ...


15

Generally, if you are using an inner tube in the tire, you should replace the tire if there is more than a 2 millimeter cut in the tire casing. Not in the rubber, mind, but it the threaded cloth casing that your rubber bits are laid on to. I personally err on the side of replacement rather than risking a serious injury from a blow out at a bad time, so I ...


15

When putting tubeless tyres on I would definitely recommend that you use a sealant such as Stan's if riding somewhere with thorns. This would be your first level of defence. The sealant would seal up a thorn (or other) hole quickly and painlessly. You can repair a tubeless tyre with a vulcanizing repair kit, but reseating a tubeless on the trail is very ...


14

I believe what you're describing is the "Rim Tape". The rim tape covers up the holes in the rim (wheel) that the spokes attach through. Without that tape covering the holes, the innertube (air chamber) will be exposed to holes and sharp surfaces that are likely to cause another flat tire. If the rim tape is torn in one spot, but still covering all of those ...


14

That's a very hard area to patch properly (if its even possible), and I'd recommend putting a new tube in instead of trying to patch it. . I'd also check that the rim tape on the rim is intact and in good condition, cause otherwise if its busted, you're going to get another cut. Also, as pointed out by ChrisH in the comments, rough edges on the rim hole ...


14

A bike I sometimes borrow has one of these locks, and I can't say it's ever been a problem. You've given the answer in your question: Do not close the wheel lock between a spoke and the valve. If you're prone to forgetting this, what you need is a way to make the valve more obvious. I've had automatically illuminated valve caps before. That would do the ...


13

Every once in a while it is just bad luck. Most of the time though, if you've fitted a new tube and it starts to leak within minutes, that means you have something on the inside of your tire that is causing the leak. A thorn, piece of glass or debris, etc. Usually you can find the culprit if you very very thoroughly run your fingers along the inside of the ...


13

You have to remove the wheel to replace the tube. A repair can be done in the frame. On older bikes without quick release, and with current gear hubs, electric hubs, Nuvinci hubs, belts etc, you need a spanner and oftentimes, the gear adjustment goes back different and needs fiddling with. This reduces the advantage of tube changes. A fix is only 3 mins. ...


13

I believe pre-glued patches were always intended to be a temporary fix to get you home. When they first came out on the market I remember explicit warnings that these were not a permanent fix. Waiting for glue to set up on the side of the road is a pain, and these were intended to solve that issue by providing a quick fix to get you moving again. ...


12

Pull the valve core and poke a 2mm Allen wrench down to test the fluid level with the valve at the 6 o'clock position with the tire off the ground. You want "some" free liquid. How much depends on the tire size but I usually look for at least 3mm. Some amount of sealant from a new installation goes to coating the tire and in many cases filling in the ...


11

Generally, you repair tubes, not tires. From your last sentence, it sounds like you are indeed talking about the tire. As it is with the tube, the real answer is "Size Matters". In this case, both the size of the hole and the size (okay, type) of the tire. If I was looking at damage to a road tire "slick", the hole you describe would likely having me change ...


11

It's not going to be directly proportional. Leaving aside the quality of the tyre and what it will be rated for, the shape of the graph is likely to be a U shape: at the lower pressures the tube will be susceptible to puncture because it cannot repel sharps adequately, in addition really low pressures might let you trap the tube between the road and the rim....


11

Inflate your tires to a higher pressure. Use a pump with a pressure gauge instead of going by "feel". Check the pressure more often. The max pressure listed on the sidewall is a good starting point, but if you're already inflating to max psi, you may want to exceed it a bit. It's likely you have a slow leak, and you're at a low inflation pressure by the ...


11

As for during "How can I minimize the chance of getting a puncture while driving through glass?" Coast and distribute your weight evenly. Don't brake - it will grind the glass in. If you think you can clear it then hop it - be sure you can clear it with both tires. And a hop - not a bunny hop - a bunny hop is for height not distance. There is lot you can ...


10

My conclusion after many years of using not two, but three types of valves is that the best is the one that results most practical for you, acording to type of riding, type of pumping methods available and of course the type of bike/tire/rims you are using. Neither valve type is absolutely better than other, but one of them may result better for your ...


10

The question was asked in 2010. I believe tubeless tires were fairly widespread on mountain bikes at the time. However, tubeless tires on road, gravel, and cyclocross bikes were in their infancy in 2010. It is 2019, and things are substantially different. Tubeless tires with sealant do address the original question. Tubeless products have advanced enough ...


10

The problem appears to be when air gets into the tube of glue - if air is present in the tube, evaporation will take place. This air can enter the tube during patching, or from a poor seal between the cap and the tube. I was able to get a tube of glue to last for over 2 years (and 8 patches) by following advice from the other answers here: Make the ...


10

I had a spate of these; all the tubes had an elliptical, smooth rubber section immediately around the valve, and then a weld joining this to the body of the tube. The failure was always at this weld, and it looked as if the tube had herniated (bulged out in a single spot before bursting there). After ruling out tape problems, burrs, sharps, valve hole ...


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