17

I see three possibilities: Your tire pressure is too low and you are getting pinch flats. As a reference point, with 25mm wide tires and your 74kg weight I’d use at least 6bars (600 kPa) of pressure, better 6.5 or 7. Refill every week or so. Usually with pinch flats you’ll have two holes in opposing sides of the tube, like a snake bite (hence why they are ...


12

Pull the valve core and poke a 2mm Allen wrench down to test the fluid level with the valve at the 6 o'clock position with the tire off the ground. You want "some" free liquid. How much depends on the tire size but I usually look for at least 3mm. Some amount of sealant from a new installation goes to coating the tire and in many cases filling in the ...


10

there are a few things to check: make sure the rim tape is in good condition (no tears/holes, make sure it's properly aligned in the rim) remove rim tape and check if any spokes protrude more than approx 1-2mm past the top of the spoke nipples, if they do consider shortening these spokes with a file, Dremel or the like or adjusting the spokes such that they ...


10

The question was asked in 2010. I believe tubeless tires were fairly widespread on mountain bikes at the time. However, tubeless tires on road, gravel, and cyclocross bikes were in their infancy in 2010. It is 2019, and things are substantially different. Tubeless tires with sealant do address the original question. Tubeless products have advanced enough ...


9

The most likely problem is that the brakes are rubbing. If you pick up the front of the bike, hold your head near the brakes and spin the wheel you shouldn't hear any noise from the brakes. If you do, then the brakes are rubbing and that's the first problem to be fixed. To be honest, I'd guess that's 99% likely to be your problem. If you have fenders, ...


9

If you can put a patch on without overlapping the existing one, it's fine. If the patches would overlap, I can't see any problem but I could have missed something. Were the two punctures in rapid succession? If so, that and the similar location suggests that there's still debris in your tyre: check the area carefully for glass or similar pokng through the ...


7

Patches that overlap are less likely to work - even more so if they're those blunt-edged ones. Thin patches that taper off gently will be more likely to work when overlapped. Two patches overlapped may also cause an excessive bump, so I might take off the existing patch and fit the bigger size patch over both holes. On one rare tube I ended up making a ...


6

Depends on your confidence levels - if you're going for a 3 hour tour then its a very long walk home. For a 5 minute roll to the local shops, a walk would merely be annoying. Topping up sealant is normal, and should be done every ~6 months anyway. As long as you have the same stuff, I'd consider it. First try to ascertain how much is left in the tyre, ...


5

According to Slime's blog, "The red label line of Slime products is designed specifically to stop flats in tires with tubes. Tubes are the key word here. Your bicycles, dirt bikes, hand dollies, wheelbarrows and jogging strollers with tubes are perfect candidates for the red label product." I get the impression, and am doing more research into slime, but ...


5

Others have already suggested some likely explanations, which I agree with. If you're not already doing this, I suggest that you line up the labels on your tires with your valve stems. Aside from looking more "pro," this has a real benefit: when you find the punctured spot in the tube, you can map that back to the tire. This is important, because a tiny ...


5

These are pinch flats, also known as snake bites. For more info, you could have a look at What are pinch flats?, Best practice for patching snakebite pinch flats on skinny tubes and Is there anything I can do to prevent snakebites (pinch flats)?


4

According to the name-brand Slime supplier's own article on The Science Behind Slime Tire Sealant : Slime repairs flats with a mechanical seal, meaning physical particles actually plug up the hole. There is no chemical reaction at the puncture site. These physical particles are a combination of long and short fibers, as well as rubber particles (...


4

The edges of patches tend to come unstuck because you are attaching a stiff flat patch to a curved surface. To avoid this, make sure that the vulcanizing solution covers the entire area of the patch, apply pressure to the entire patch while it is curing, and wait a sufficient amount of time before reinflating the tube. And as others have commented, abrading ...


4

A puncture. Maybe a bit of glass still stuck in the tire. The tire had already lost air then when you pumped it up it got worse. Assuming it's a tire with a tube, you can get a tire patch kit or buy a new tube. If you're going to patch it, take the tube out, inflate it and locate the leak. Stick it in a bowl of water and look for the bubbles if it's hard ...


4

Yes, the less rubber there is between the tube and the road, the more likely it gets for you to find a shard/stone/thorn that's big enough to cut through to the tube. The amount of rubber is your main defense against punctures. Consequently, puncture proof tires usually add quite thick layers of extra rubber / rubbery material. They may also have improved ...


4

When you buy your new tube, consider also getting a puncture repair kit as well at the same time. Then you don't have to throw away the current tube ($) and you can repair punctures away from home too. To understand the numbers, the most meaningful set is 35-622. This code is saying that the tyre is 35mm wide and has an inner diameter of 622mm. The tube ...


3

This could possibly be a case of cheap low quality tyres. It is common for bikes to come new with poor quality tyres that do not have any sort of puncture protection layer. Manufacturers do this to keep the price point of the bike down reasoning that anyone that cares about tyres is likely to have their own preferences anyway. So my advice would be to ...


3

TLDR - I have been commuting daily on tubeless tires now for about 3.5 yrs. In my 20 years of daily cycling experience, I have had a number of tubed tires spontaneously rupture due to heat, especially if a wheel set was left in the back of a car! I haven't had a tubeless tire explode yet using tubeless specific rims and tires. Hypothesis: Previous damage ...


3

Answer: No, not really. Duct tape, "duck" tape, or any adhesive tape by itself is not enough to stop a puncture. At best the extra layers will slow down ingress of a sharp foreign object in your tyre carcass, but no different to a thicker rubber tread. If your tyre is getting worn in the middle, there's often an uptick in the frequency of punctures which ...


3

Along with all of the other excellent suggestions I'd like to add - be road aware. As you ride keep an eye on the level of road debris (along with an eye on traffic, pedestrians and everything else!) far enough in front of you that you can make an adjustment if you need to. Plan the best path for your tires. When you see tire hazards on the road - metal, ...


2

A bit late getting onto this, but I am looking at exactly the same problem. It is like under high pressure (110psi in my case) the inner tube is pressed out through the spoke hole and I guess becomes so thin it bursts. It cannot be a spoke puncture as the tape is still ok with no signs of being punctured. I have ordered high pressure 120psi rim tapes and ...


2

Nobody's said it explicitly, so I will: ordinary patches are completely fine for slits and holes a couple of millimetres across. Your description of the patches "ballooning" suggests one of two things. Either you're inflating the tube to moderately high pressure outside the tyre, or there's a significant hole in the tyre that the tube is coming through. In ...


2

I had this same question so I did some looking around. Here's what I picked up -- The simple formula for figuring out which tire works for you. Take the amount of contact area of the tire on the ground and multiply by PSI you have in your tire. So, the "area" (width times length) of the tire along the ground, multiplied by the psi. So, 2" of tire down ...


2

I've tried all of the things mentioned in the other answers here and still had problems. I eventually found a solution that worked well for me. I made a little "patch" to reinforce the tube around the valve. I cut out a piece of an old tube about the width of the tire, maybe a little smaller. Then, I cut a little slit in the center, just big enough to push ...


2

Install the tire and pump up to pressure and see if there is any bulging which would indicate the chords are damaged. Damaged tires belong in the trash. If there is no sign of chord damage and you decide to use the tire, I would strongly suggest 2 or 3 layers of duct tape or similar as a patch on the inside. Not only will this provide additional strength ...


2

You need any traditional road or cyclocross or gravel or hybrid bike tube with (that means 700 mm outer diameter 622 mm rim diameter, that is the ubiquitous road wheel size) or an MTB (trekking, hybrid,...) tube for 28 inch diameter tyres (also called 29 inch, it is the same as the former, just in inches) that allows for 35 mm resp. 1.35 inch tyres (the ...


1

I'd say you could keep using it as long as the hole isn't all the way through. Make sure the piece of glass or whatever caused the cut is removed from the tire so it doesn't cause a flat next time you ride the bike. I've worn out many tires and at the end of their life (when they're worn so far I have to replace them) they usually have cuts that look like ...


1

Sanding the patch area really shouldn't be considered optional. Innertubes are coated with mold-release compound that prevents the vulcanizing agent from reacting with the rubber. You can abrade it off or wash it off with soap and water. The sandpaper probably also creates a little more surface area for the vulcanizing agent to react with. In the case ...


1

Please remove the wheel from your bicycle (Quick release or bolts) and check for resistance moving the axle on it's own. A common axle construction features cone nuts, and lock nuts both inside the arms of your fork. I've often observed that if the lock nut is not snug against the cone nut, they relative tightness can change just removing the wheel for any ...


1

Additional things worth checking; Wheel is in the bike straight and secure Brake cables are seated properly Brake caliper is securely fitted and aligned well Brake pads aren't touching the rim, or the tyre Wheel bearings are rolling freely Wheel rim width could be larger than the old wheel (if it was replaced) causing it to touch the brake pads set up for ...


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