12

Pull the valve core and poke a 2mm Allen wrench down to test the fluid level with the valve at the 6 o'clock position with the tire off the ground. You want "some" free liquid. How much depends on the tire size but I usually look for at least 3mm. Some amount of sealant from a new installation goes to coating the tire and in many cases filling in the ...


10

The question was asked in 2010. I believe tubeless tires were fairly widespread on mountain bikes at the time. However, tubeless tires on road, gravel, and cyclocross bikes were in their infancy in 2010. It is 2019, and things are substantially different. Tubeless tires with sealant do address the original question. Tubeless products have advanced enough ...


9

If you can put a patch on without overlapping the existing one, it's fine. If the patches would overlap, I can't see any problem but I could have missed something. Were the two punctures in rapid succession? If so, that and the similar location suggests that there's still debris in your tyre: check the area carefully for glass or similar pokng through the ...


9

The most likely problem is that the brakes are rubbing. If you pick up the front of the bike, hold your head near the brakes and spin the wheel you shouldn't hear any noise from the brakes. If you do, then the brakes are rubbing and that's the first problem to be fixed. To be honest, I'd guess that's 99% likely to be your problem. If you have fenders, ...


7

Patches that overlap are less likely to work - even more so if they're those blunt-edged ones. Thin patches that taper off gently will be more likely to work when overlapped. Two patches overlapped may also cause an excessive bump, so I might take off the existing patch and fit the bigger size patch over both holes. On one rare tube I ended up making a ...


6

Depends on your confidence levels - if you're going for a 3 hour tour then its a very long walk home. For a 5 minute roll to the local shops, a walk would merely be annoying. Topping up sealant is normal, and should be done every ~6 months anyway. As long as you have the same stuff, I'd consider it. First try to ascertain how much is left in the tyre, ...


5

According to Slime's blog, "The red label line of Slime products is designed specifically to stop flats in tires with tubes. Tubes are the key word here. Your bicycles, dirt bikes, hand dollies, wheelbarrows and jogging strollers with tubes are perfect candidates for the red label product." I get the impression, and am doing more research into slime, but ...


4

Yes, the less rubber there is between the tube and the road, the more likely it gets for you to find a shard/stone/thorn that's big enough to cut through to the tube. The amount of rubber is your main defense against punctures. Consequently, puncture proof tires usually add quite thick layers of extra rubber / rubbery material. They may also have improved ...


4

The edges of patches tend to come unstuck because you are attaching a stiff flat patch to a curved surface. To avoid this, make sure that the vulcanizing solution covers the entire area of the patch, apply pressure to the entire patch while it is curing, and wait a sufficient amount of time before reinflating the tube. And as others have commented, abrading ...


4

A puncture. Maybe a bit of glass still stuck in the tire. The tire had already lost air then when you pumped it up it got worse. Assuming it's a tire with a tube, you can get a tire patch kit or buy a new tube. If you're going to patch it, take the tube out, inflate it and locate the leak. Stick it in a bowl of water and look for the bubbles if it's hard ...


3

Answer: No, not really. Duct tape, "duck" tape, or any adhesive tape by itself is not enough to stop a puncture. At best the extra layers will slow down ingress of a sharp foreign object in your tyre carcass, but no different to a thicker rubber tread. If your tyre is getting worn in the middle, there's often an uptick in the frequency of punctures which ...


3

TLDR - I have been commuting daily on tubeless tires now for about 3.5 yrs. In my 20 years of daily cycling experience, I have had a number of tubed tires spontaneously rupture due to heat, especially if a wheel set was left in the back of a car! I haven't had a tubeless tire explode yet using tubeless specific rims and tires. Hypothesis: Previous damage ...


2

Nobody's said it explicitly, so I will: ordinary patches are completely fine for slits and holes a couple of millimetres across. Your description of the patches "ballooning" suggests one of two things. Either you're inflating the tube to moderately high pressure outside the tyre, or there's a significant hole in the tyre that the tube is coming through. In ...


2

You say that both tyres deflated suddenly and you pumped them up on Sunday from flat. I think the sun has caused this in one of maybe two ways. If both tyres were flat on Sunday because they had slow punctures, then when they were out in the sun all that time, they got hot and the pressure increased. That increased pressure made the slow punctures into much ...


2

Install the tire and pump up to pressure and see if there is any bulging which would indicate the chords are damaged. Damaged tires belong in the trash. If there is no sign of chord damage and you decide to use the tire, I would strongly suggest 2 or 3 layers of duct tape or similar as a patch on the inside. Not only will this provide additional strength ...


1

I'd say you could keep using it as long as the hole isn't all the way through. Make sure the piece of glass or whatever caused the cut is removed from the tire so it doesn't cause a flat next time you ride the bike. I've worn out many tires and at the end of their life (when they're worn so far I have to replace them) they usually have cuts that look like ...


1

Sanding the patch area really shouldn't be considered optional. Innertubes are coated with mold-release compound that prevents the vulcanizing agent from reacting with the rubber. You can abrade it off or wash it off with soap and water. The sandpaper probably also creates a little more surface area for the vulcanizing agent to react with. In the case ...


1

Please remove the wheel from your bicycle (Quick release or bolts) and check for resistance moving the axle on it's own. A common axle construction features cone nuts, and lock nuts both inside the arms of your fork. I've often observed that if the lock nut is not snug against the cone nut, they relative tightness can change just removing the wheel for any ...


1

Additional things worth checking; Wheel is in the bike straight and secure Brake cables are seated properly Brake caliper is securely fitted and aligned well Brake pads aren't touching the rim, or the tyre Wheel bearings are rolling freely Wheel rim width could be larger than the old wheel (if it was replaced) causing it to touch the brake pads set up for ...


1

There is exactly one way to fix that tube: Toss it in the trash can, and buy a new one. Whether patches are glue-less or not, they all get unglued over time by the slime. And while you are buying a new tube, don't buy more slime. Buy a serious puncture proof tire instead. For any slime, there is an upper limit of how much puncture it can seal before failing ...


1

Yes, you should definitely cut the head out when you get back to your house, and then patch the tire. Whether you want to install a tube, instead of continuing to run tubeless.


1

Tubeless tire setup is the most puncture-resistance you can ask for. When your tire gets pricked by a thorn, sliced slightly on a rock or pinched against the rim, air will leak out of the tire, but sealant will also leak out of the same spot. Sealant is designed to clog this hole and "glue" it shut. Like noox and mikes have said, tubes aren't the solution. ...


1

From my experience in mountain biking the tire is much more important than the tube. I have not heard of puncture resistant tubes with a special layer. I assume these are just heavier and thicker tubes. Many friend and I ride/rode 185g tubes from a major brand here in Europe on 2.5"x26.0 tires. Some tried even lighter ones. Years ago we tried heavier ones (...


1

My choice would be based on my current need. How often are you getting punctures? How efficiently can you make repairs? Are you commuting to work where the delay from a flat repair results in lost wages or potential job loss? Then go with puncture resistant tires. Then add the flat resistant tubes if needed. If your tires are fairly new but prone to ...


1

This happened to me today and I'll offer a possible explanation. I think I may have inflated my rear tyre on my Brompton too much. Anyway I cycled to work (this was a new tube by the way) and stored it under my desk. It was very warm in the office. After about 6 hours there was a loud hiss that took everyone by surprise - the tyre was flat. I took it to my ...


1

If you can push the rim tape aside, I'm guessing it's that rubbery strip typically installed by the factory. You might consider getting better rim tape, which will have an adhesive backing and cannot be pushed aside. If multiple patches are not sticking, is it possible you aren't applying them correctly? The innertube has mold-release compound on it that ...


1

This is an excerpt from https://mast.queensu.ca/~peter/grade12/MHF4U-1/15.pdf It is a 12th grade textbook explaining how pressure works. "The students have a tendency to think of the tire as a balloon, with the air being pushed out because of the elastic force of the tube as it contracts. But when the tube is imprisoned inside the tire, it doesn’t stretch as ...


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