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7

Who to believe? You can believe that the shop owner believes that tubeless is not for him/her. But that does not mean that you are in exactly the same situation or have the same needs. Here are some high level steps for arriving at a solution that works for you. Read and listen to what others say Look for information that matches what you intend to do and ...


10

Just check the tube more carefully, some holes are very hard to spot. Put it into the water and look for bubbles. You must fill the tube and press it. Try hearing any hiss when pressing the tube in the air. There could still be a thorn in your tyre, we have many similar questions. It does not matter if it is an e-bike or not.


1

A corollary point - you need to find a way to protect your bike from damage while it is parked. Overnight is many hours of time when your bike is exposed and there are few people around. If you were in a rack, park it further away from where people walk. If your bike was blocking someone else, don't. If you had unwittingly taken "someone's spot" ...


16

Another possible cause is misadjusted rim brakes where the brake pad makes contact with the tire's sidewall.


4

It appears that the cords holding the body of the tire to the bead have torn. Overinflation, hitting a rock, curb, or other obstacle, running the tire at too low a pressure can cause such damage. I'm sure there are a host of other reasons as well. It's also possible this tire was defective from the start. Hard to say at this point.


9

You already know the answer to this question. Slashes in the sidewall tend to open up as the pressure from inner tube is pushing the tire further apart. If you're lucky you might escape with a simple pinch flat. More serious problems include: the inner tube pushing through the sidewall rubbing on the frame or fork causing the inner tube to burst like a ...


7

Thorns generally don't make neat round holes as per your picture. While its not impossible, this looks more like a wear indicator, a hemispherical pit on the tyre's tread, intended to show when the tyre needs replacement by wearing off. If you can hold the tyre up to the light (when its off the rim!) and see light through, then your inner tube could ...


0

Yes, good advice here, esp re: ”pinch flats“ —sometimes called “snakebites“ because you’ll see two parallel holes. I learned this the hard way, too: check tire pressure is near or @ the maximum psi printed on sidewall before every ride, even *daily! Evidently, *all tubes lose air gradually; under-inflation has caused three flats here in as many days. Shop ...


1

Completely remove the tire, tube. Check the rim tape is sitting correctly, and remove that. Clean the rim of any debris that might have go inside it and under the rim tape. With three punctures in the inside take a very close look at the rim tape for any sign of damage. Also check the rim for sharp burrs than may have occurred due to riding on the flat. If ...


1

A lot of good advice so far. Pinch flats are very likely, but also check the rim strip/tape which protects the tube from the spoke nipple ends on the rim itself. ( the location of the punctures should offer a clue as to the cause of the punctures ) Assuming you have the common 700x23c tires, I'd ditch those skinny tires and put some 700x28c tires on there ...


6

As a 310lbs person, you absolutely must inflate your tires to the max rated value. It's printed on the side of your tire. For safety, it is advisable to also check the rating of your rim, as it also needs to withstand the tension of your tire. If you ride at 80psi, that means that you have a contact area with the road that's 310lbs/80psi = 3.75inch^2. I.e. a ...


6

Other than Argenti Apparatus' great advice, if you get punctures frequently, one of the following might also be the case: You may have a small sharp object stuck in your tyre. Your rim tape may be worn out or misaligned, resulting in spoke holes rubbing through your tubes (happened to me personally, resulted in about 4 flats within a month before I realized ...


20

Increased load (i.e rider weight) on a pneumatic tire does not increase the pressure in the tire. The contact patch on the ground just increases in size until the contact patch area x pressure = load (or the rim contacts the ground). What might be happening is you are getting pinch flats when hitting bumps or holes. This is when the tire and tube are ...


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