24

This is a standard quick release mechanism simply grab the lever indicated below and flip it the opposite direction (green arrow). At which point it should loosen up a bit, then you can spin it around to the left to unscrew it further. You do not have to take it all the way out, just loosen it enough to be able to slide the wheel out. You can also hold onto ...


18

You are correct that those levers are designed to be opened with your bare hands. Unfortunately it's usually easier to push the lever closed than to pull it open, so it's easy to over-tighten it. Start with the lever open, and facing back as shown in the picture Wind the nut on the other side back 2 or 3 turns. Close the lever. It should be very easy, and ...


17

The springs help you center the skewer in the dropout which makes the wheel easier to install. You don't need them for the QR skewer to work, but they're nice to have -- if they're damaged or lost, don't worry about it. Once the wheel is on the bike, they don't do anything.


11

Rule #41 Quick-release levers are to be carefully positioned.: Quick release angle on the front skewer shall be an upward angle which tightens just aft of the fork and the rear quick release shall tighten at an angle that bisects angle between the seat and chain stays. It is acceptable, however, to have the rear quick release tighten upward, just aft of ...


11

Something noone has mentioned is that the QR lever is not to be touching the frame or fork when in the closed position. Reasons for this are the clamping force is not as high as it could be the frame or fork can slowly push on the lever and loosen it a bit more over time.


9

The QR interface is designed such that the axle is fully seated in the dropouts before engaging the QR. The QR engagement should be firm, but it is not designed to hold the wheel in the way you describe. Dangers of trying to do what you suggest are: Severely over-tightening the QR (which you may need to do to keep the wheel in place) could potentially ...


9

Yep. Quick releases are standard and interchangeable. You need to make sure you get one the right length for a front hub. Front hubs for a road bike, hybrid or older MTB will be 100mm wide.


8

What I worry about mainly is the horizontal alignment of the wheels and brakes (V brakes or disks). In my experience just pressing fork down on the wheels will then "auto fit" which creates an horizontally accurate alignment. I press from the handlebars vertically to the ground and the wheel keeps an horizontal alignment with the brakes (accurately set). ...


8

From Sheldon Brown: The lever goes on the non-drive side of the bike (i.e. the side without the gears). One spring should be on the non-drive side of the bike and the other spring should be on the drive side. The smaller ends of the springs should be pointing towards each other, towards the center of the skewer. Since you asked this, I strongly suggest ...


8

Those washers help prevent your axles from dropping out of the dropouts if your quick releases become loose. In the USA, the CPSC requires some sort of secondary axle retention device -- if you don't have "lawyer's lips," you're likely to have these. With some solid axles, they also help a bit with the axle nuts not loosening by themselves. With ebikes, ...


7

Looks like an attaching point for some kind of trailer, maybe a single wheel trailer.


7

As long as the skewer is set with sufficient clamping force this QR disc brake setup should work fine and from a practical standpoint there will be very little functional difference between this setup and a thru-axle. If the QR is not sufficiently tight (i.e., you didn't set it with enough clamping force), you may notice a small shift in the axle position ...


6

I had this same problem but i went to a bike shop and explained the situation, the bike mechanic gave me a serrated washer to be placed between the skewer and the bike frame on the cassette side. This solved the issue


6

Unless you really care how the bike looks and about extra 50 grams on the bike... Find a piece of old chain. Wash and clean it. Find a piece of old tube, best would be road bike tube. Measure the distance between saddle rails and top chains - double it and you'll need that much of tube and chain. Cut the tube and chain to the measures. Pull the chain ...


6

Simply for your two points: For a front wheel you can buy or machine a part that will allow you to run a smaller axle on the front than the hub is equipped with. This an adapter to run a 15mm TA hub in 9mm drop outs. The rear is more difficult as hub sizes get wider with larger diameter thru axles. You couldn't make a 12x142 thru axle hub fit in a 10x135 ...


6

Pointing it forward or downwards would be problematic as the lever might get caught somewhere and therefore get opened. Remains pointing it backwards and upwards parallel to the fork. When pointing it parallel to the fork blade, it might touch the fork and therefore not fully close. This might cause the quick release to open by itself unintendedly. One can ...


6

It's hard to tell exactly what was done and why – it would help to know the original and new tire sizes. But what it looks like is that the shop added inline barrel adjusters to your brake cables. That's consistent with your description as well. They probably added them because the release levers on the brakes didn't give enough clearance to remove/install ...


5

The springs simply keep the quick release (QR) skewer centered in the wheel hub, making it easier to insert the hub (and wheel) into the frame dropouts. It has no safety function other than to facilitate seating the wheel correctly. If the wheel is not seated correctly in the drops when you tighten the QR then you run the risk of the wheel coming out ...


5

This is easily accomplished, simply replace the axle from your wheel with a QR axle, at most you may have to cut an axle/skewer to length and maybe cut more threads if you can't find an axle and skewer with enough thread on it. But you'll need to be comfortable with cutting metal and have the right die set. If you try shopping around for a 120mm rear QR ...


5

Best bet with quick releases when they are hard to remove because of the frame in the way is to get a rag, place it against the frame and then use a long-handled screwdriver to pry it up. That works all the time in the bike-shop I work at. Good luck! EDIT I should actually say, if you have carbon fiber release levers, be VERY careful not to crack/crush it,...


5

I'm curious about why you bought a trailer without checking that it would attach to your bike. It would be better to return it, taking your bike(s) into the shop, and get them to find something that works. You're already suffering from the sunk cost fallacy (you bought something that doesn't work and your proposed solution is to spend more time and effort on ...


5

Interesting idea but the front axle (whether is be a 15mm through-axle or a 9mm QR axle) does not rotate, the hub-body and by extension the rest of the wheel rotates about the axel via the bearings. Making such a system where the axel does rotate (e.g. unicycle fork) would require creating a capture system (which is the current function of the QR) to secure ...


5

Installing quick release axles requires completely replacing the axle. It's possible but does require a few extra tools and parts to disassemble the rear hub. If you install a QR, don't forget to choose a trainer specific QR, they are strong and have tough metal nuts. The simplest method though would be some other type of axle nut which is compatible with ...


5

It is counter-intuitive but the axle is not holding the wheel onto the bike. That's the job of the skewer and Quick Release. The axle is in the dropout to hold the weight of the bike from above - your photos are from below. The axle also provides support for the surfaces where the bearings and therefore the wheel run. So almost all the time, the axle is ...


5

Can I even put in a solid axle in this wheel/hub? Probably not. The axles of QR hubs are generally not designed to be removed and replaced with a through-axle. Some hubs are designed for both retention systems and can be converted. This does not look like one of them. I've never seen a rim brake hub with a through axle.


5

Frame rear dropouts and forks for through-axles are of a substantially different design than those designed for quick-release hubs. Through axles are essentially a large bolt that attaches the wheel to the frame whereas quick releases (and older threaded axles clamp the hub into slots. Most frames and forks cannot be easily modified, the dropouts are ...


5

Yes. There are many, many products exactly as you describe, with mechanisms ranging from simple hex keys to actual locks. A web search for "theft proof quick release", "anti theft skewer" or something like that should find some of them.


5

Most of the time, a bike wheel spins around the axle. When braking, the axle suddenly wants to spin around the point where the brake caliper is grabbing. The traditional orientation for a fork dropout, with the opening a little forward of straight down, is such that on a rim brake, these forces pull the axle stubs up into the dropout, and no movement can ...


4

They come with bolts because QR's typcially don't clamp with enough force to keep the wheel from slipping forward. It looks like you have rear facing dropouts, so you should easily be able to use QR's if you get yourself a Surly Tuggnut. That little circle on the side of it is a QR adapter. You just pop it in and then slide your skewer all the way ...


4

It should be fully closed. The lever is only intended to be opened to allow the tire to pass during a wheel change or if you hit a pothole and knock your wheel badly out of true. If your pads are too close to the rim you make an adjustment with the barrel adjuster. Riding with the quick release open compromises the braking power of the caliper. You may not ...


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