Hot answers tagged

32

Details depend on the ride, but usually organized rides provide things that you'd have to provide yourself. This one appears to provide a lot. This is covered by the catchall term "support", as in a supported ride. The support that everyone enjoys is the food and drink along the way ("The Best Rest Stops") - scroll down on the page you linked, and you'll ...


30

I don't have the time to give a full answer at the moment, but I'll upvote a full answer and delete mine. The short incomplete answer is that you're better off pacing yourself relatively evenly. The reasons are both physics and physiological. The physics answer is that drag increases nonlinearly with speed so at higher speeds you're using more of your energy ...


20

There is an article on Runners World that asked somewhat the same question, do you start fast or do an even pace? The general conclusion is that elite runners tend to start faster than their eventual main pace, and also increase speed for the finish. The article also cites a study done with 15 well trained cyclists on a 20km time trial. The basic ...


15

I haven't done one of those big organized rides yet, but signed up for a local one in May (and a multi-day fundraising ride in September) and have volunteered helping out with some of that kind of ride before. Most basically, those events usually make it easier and let you concentrate on riding. "Heavy bicycle traffic" is also probably a good chance to ...


15

I expect that the three main contributors are: The solo riders are just stronger. There's more glory in the solo win so, if you are strong enough to, say, come in the top five on your own, it's probably better to do that than come in the top five as a pair. For example, compare tennis: the really strong players concentrate on singles. It's easier to look ...


12

Treating "competitive cyclists" as this single unified group (with three subgrouping) belies some prejudices. Like all walks of life there are a diversity of people, all with different motivations, morals and life experiences. As such there is no single correct answer your various questions. For example: are people in pelotons generally friendly, ...


11

Don't buy a €3K first bike! Instead, split your budget and get one for <1K. There are plenty of good advice here already (my vote goes to randonneur-type bike), and each of the suggested types can be had for that price. Don't aim at the highest specs: you don't know yet what you'll need. Just get something decent in the middle. Indeed, get to your local ...


10

The main hindrance will be actually getting going from a standstill. This kind of thing has been done quite a bit and is called motor-pacing and involves riding a very highly geared (usually fixed-gear) bike behind a fast car with some kind of fairing to reduce wind resistance on the bike. Speeds of well over 100mph have been reached. This kind of bike is ...


10

Consider two quite strong riders. One is an amazing climber and the other descends at ludicrous speeds. They ride over a col together. They go up at the pace of the slower climber, and come down the other side at the pace of the slower descender, thus taking longer than either would have on their own. Of course both riding at their own pace and regrouping ...


9

I think you answered your own question when you stated "I don't race." I know many in our club who enjoy the Roubaix. I personally prefer riding my steel Soma ES over my carbon race bike for most things, including fast club rides. Don't get me wrong, a twitchy race bike is great in a crit, but the other non-race bikes have had their design optimized for ...


9

Nothing - you're not missing anything; going out and riding 100 miles on your own is fine, but going out on an organised ride is a different experience. Maybe it's about the camaraderie, following someone else's route, not having to think about the route - just follow the signs or the provided GPX, the provided rest stops, mechanical support, accurate ...


9

It is not allowed by UCI rules, but comissars usually allow it if it is due to mechanical reasons and used to get back to the peloton, since they have discretional ability to decide. Time penalties or disqualification if used to gain advantage over the peloton. So, rule enforcement may vary depending on many circumstances, and I guess they don't want to lose ...


8

The other answers given here are correct in that there are physical limitations to the size of a single chainring; however, you can get around that limitation by building a "double reduction" gearing system where you sequentially link, say, a 4-to-1 gear ratio with another 4-to-1 gear ratio to get a final ratio of 16-to-1. As noted above, Fred Rompelberg set ...


8

Don't make any major mechanical changes to your bike the day before the race. If it ain't broke, don't fix it- at least not at the last minute. You will end up kicking yourself for it. Make sure you've had plenty of riding time on your bike's current configuration. Bring tools and tubes, but pack light. Bring a small/medium sized multi tool, a tube, ...


8

Yes, unless they say no. The "Spirit of Enduro" is to include all riders, of all abilities, on all bikes. Since there are guys who can ride crazy fast on a hardtail down a downhill trail, you can certainly ride yours in an Enduro race. However, you might be putting yourself at a disadvantage compared to the pro's or if you are looking to be competitive. ...


8

One of the things we sometimes have to accept in science is that we have observed facts that we can't fully explain. Fatigue is not well understood physiologically. For middle and long distances, the human body has enough muscle glycogen and liver glycogen to fuel vigorous exertion for about 2 hours. It's not a coincidence that a world-record marathon pace ...


7

This will run in python (only 3.X, not 2.7), a free to install programming language. Simply save the following as a file ending .py - e.g. timetrials.py. Then open IDLE3 (start menu), and open the file (Ctrl+O). Finally, press F5 to start it. import datetime from operator import itemgetter def get_int_input(prompt, min_=0, max_=None): """Get a valid ...


7

Replace "cycling" in this question with any competitive sport. How should we know if it's right for you? How should we know what the community of cyclists near you is like, or whether or not you'll get along with them? Enter a race. Did you have fun? Enter another one. Or don't. Your call.


7

Here is a site with a chart that lists pro cyclist's height and weight ranges. Source credit is http://www.wenzelcoaching.com/blog/cycling-body-weight-chart/


7

Yes, they sometimes do (or at least announce/intend to), here are two examples: This is the 3T Strada that Aqua Blue Sport will ride in 2018, making the Irish-based squad the first pro cycling team to use a single-chainring drivetrain. Source One ring to rule them all: Tony Martin's Canyon Speedmax 58x11-32 on the world champ's time trial rig ...


6

Yes, no*, yes. Enduro racing is a hybrid sport, but the timed aspects of it are almost all downhill. As such, you're going to want a bike that can handle that the best, which would most likely be a full suspension frame. There aren't any specific rules (yet) against hard tails, although a few events may dictate no hardtails for their race specifically. One ...


6

Don't enter a category that's too advanced. Eat a lot, but not too much the night before. Get some sleep, this one's hard. Stay out of the way of anyone in a higher category if they're starting after you or lapping you. Don't drink too much during the race, you'll feel sick. But don't skimp either. Expect to get elbowed out of the way a lot for the first km. ...


6

BMX was originally (and still is) run on smooth dirt track that have obstacles such as jumps and whoops (also know as the rhythm sections). Because the tracks are smooth a small fully rigid bike works amazingly well when ridden appropriately. The BMX bike and track evolved together emphasizing a riding style that is about timing and body position. All of ...


6

You can ride any bike in a race, provided it's in good enough working order to get you over the line. Regarding gears, it looks like the cost to add derailleur style gears may be prohibitive, as I assume this bike's rear wheel is single-speed specific and the dropouts aren't vertical (which isn't the end of the world but not ideal). I'd probably either look ...


5

Welcome from a fellow Kiwi - love that area of the country. It should be a great ride - nearly all down hill and relatively flat, however keep in mind the short winter days make it difficult sticking to training schedules...... Between now an November you have heaps of time to get fit enough for the event. It's 160km for the full event - more than big ...


5

Organized rides are great. You get a lot of support in terms of rest stops, mechanical help, and medical assistance. A subset of this is charity rides. These are particularly nice because there are often people along the route cheering for you at various points along the way. On the other hand, riding solo is more challenging and you get the choose your ...


5

I once went for a recognition ride on a race track for a competition just a day before the actual event. The track was exactly the same, it was already marked and it did not cross any fence or busy street (it was a pure mountain biking race). Of course, I went to the competition the next day. The biggest difference was purely psychological, but big enough ...


5

Many first time cross racers use a mountain bike. It makes perfect sense, don't go out and spend $1500+ before you even know whether cyclocross is your cup of tea. Most all races allow mountain bikes, the only type of equipment that's usually forbidden is a fixed gear. A full suspension mountain bike will do just fine as an introductory race vehicle. Your ...


5

According to UCI's official regulations Section 1.3.031 (emphasis mine) Wearing a rigid safety helmet shall be mandatory during competitions and training sessions in the following disciplines: track, mountain bike, cyclo-cross, trials and BMX, para-cycling, as well as during cycling for all events. During competitions on the road, a rigid ...


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