Hot answers tagged

21

The advantages of seat mounted racks are that they don’t require rear dropout rack lugs; some of the seat mount racks have quick release levers so you can easily take them off (while racing or transporting the bike, etc), and are many times the only option for a rear suspension bike. The disadvantages of seat mount racks are numerous: max luggage weight ...


20

I avoid backpacks where possible 1) Sweat - I get damp enough wearing just a cycling top. Putting anything else on top makes it much worse. 2) Crashing - Occasionally I have carried a toolbox in a tramping pack. One of the worries is "what happens if I end up rolling on this?" 3) Visibility - can be off-set with reflective tape or an overbag/wrapper/...


17

Several manufacturers make replacement seatpost collars with integrated rack mount holes. Just make sure you get the right diameter for your seat tube. Here is an example:


16

There is no real problems other than things getting scratched or broken being shuffled around, derailleurs easily get caught on seat belts etc. There is however a very easy and affordable option to avoid this. (Assuming you have QR skewers) Install a 2x4 or similar piece of wood. Then mount QR truck mounts to said 2x4. If you are going to be using your SUV ...


15

25kg on a rear rack is already very hard to handle, especially if it’s on the top of the rack. Start leaning the bike unconsciously while standing at a red traffic light and you’ll suddenly do a very embarrassing dance trying to prevent the whole thing (+you) from toppling over. Carrying more than 25kg on a rear rack is really not a good idea. I doubt the ...


12

Weight on the bike is easier to manage than weight on your body. The bike will handle a bit differently, but you'll quickly get used to it. If all you use the bike for is commuting, you should get the rack. Like you, I commute with a backpack, but I wouldn't consider a rack because I also regularly use my bike for recreational purposes.


11

The problem with nostagia is the n+1 rule. Bikes manufacturers have been on a never ending quest to make bikes more and more task specific. This means most "racing" bikes are not well suited to everyday transportation riding. Modern "Race" Road Bikes Mixing fenders and a rack with a modern road race bikes is like trying to get oil and water to mix. The ...


11

Your responses to the suggestions so far show that you definitely need to take your bike on a bus, which is cool since it rules out all the other possibles variables that these: So the bottom lines is how likely you are to be able to get your bike on a given bus. Let's call that number ρ. Now then, since that probably is less than 1, you need to be ...


10

The main issue is the load limits on those racks, and the second one is why those limits exist. The Thule Pack ’n Pedal Tour Rack is claimed to take 25kg, the Topeak seatpost mounted racks will take 9kg. Thule seem to be selling rebadged Freeload gear? I have seen a Thule rack fail with significantly less than 25kg on it, and while being ridden fairly ...


9

From rack strength perspective it doesn't make much difference. Most of the weight is going straight down to the rear dropout. The front connection is mostly for stability and isn't bearing much weight. From the seatpost's perspective, it's already carrying 150+ pounds (75kg+) of the rider. Another few pounds is nothing. (Note that racks that cantilever ...


9

In your situation, I would buy the cheaper option. Firstly, you will limit the amount of money you lose if you still want the mid-range rack later on. Secondly, I don't know how much experience you have with commuting with pannier, but I have lots and the only time I put the rack to it's limit is when I got shopping and beer crates are on discount. I rarely ...


8

I would recommend getting a second bike for commuting. The Specialized Roubaix is a racing machine. It would also be foolish to leave it locked outside a shop (in case you considered doing that). Most likely you will void the warranty by using clamps on seat stays. To get that low weight, carbon frames are strong only in certain directions and may be ...


8

The safest way to carry luggage on a carbon frame is to use a trailer, like the BOB trailers. Carbon frames are very strong, but each area of the frame is designed and tested for the loads it expects from a given direction. Adding luggage to a frame not designed for it, i.e. Without braze-one or threaded mounts, is generally a bad idea.


7

You should look into getting a folding double kickstand. They're great for loaded bikes. Both legs fold off to the left side, but when you kick it down one leg supports each side so the bike stays perfectly upright.


7

As someone who rides their bike everywhere I have experienced a great many types of bike rack. In my opinion the best choice is a Sheffield Stand. Image Copyright David Wright CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0), via Wikimedia Commons They are cheap, simple and readily available to purchase. When installing them make sure they ...


7

Weight on your body takes additional energy to carry, but it's also easier to move dynamically (it moves with your body and doesn't change the feel of the bike). I have always used and preferred backpacks for commuting. In addition to being more dynamic, it's easier to deal with once you get to your destination. You simply get off your bike and walk away. ...


7

Stability of load will likely be quite different between the Tubus and giant racks. For the Tubus racks the Tara had a cross brace to help stabilize the load. The Tubus duo does not, but if you look carefully it mounts to both the inside and the outside of the mid fork eyelets, while the Tara mounts only to the outside. This adds stability lost by not ...


7

Would not recommend I have tried this - and it works well up to where it all went badly wrong. So I had an old front wheel hollow axle with a QR skewer through it. There were two locknuts and two old cone nuts set at a distance of about 100mm, duplicating the OLD of a front wheel. Sorry no photos available. This axle had been clamped onto a rear ...


7

Depending on the thickness of your briefcase it may be a solution to hang it under the frame in the main triangle (if it fits there) but since you are thinking about a folding bike it is not a solution. I've seen something else couple of times - a special carrier for briefcases: I'm not sure how a folding bike would accommodate such a carrier as it ...


7

RoboKaren's answer is great on the pros and cons, so I'll restrict myself to explicitly answering ... why would someone get the seatpost-mounted rack over the frame-mounted rack? Really, the only reason is that your bike won't support a frame-mounted rack: for example because it has rear suspension. In engineering terms, a frame-mounted rack supports ...


7

A subset of panniers that are designed for shopping bags are often called "grocery panniers," the distinguishing features being an open top and dimensions similar to the base of a paper grocery bag (not that you can get those very much anymore). They are typically easily removable (just hooks), and in my experience do not bounce around alot, as was ...


7

As others say, this is your decision. Here's what I decided: Personally, I use one of the sturdy expensive ones (a Tubus Logo, which has now gone around with me something between 30000 and 60000 km in the last 14 years), but I use panniers (including one with A4-folder shape & size) and therefore wanted to have the 2nd lower sidewise bars for the pannier....


6

The Surly Pacer is a good choice. My first real bike was a one, and I used it for commuting, training rides, and a two-week tour in Europe. Even though it wasn't "ideal" for training rides or touring, it worked great for me until I was able to afford more specialized bikes. The Pacer doesn't come with as many rack bosses as you'll want (one advantage of the ...


6

I recently bought a new rack specifically because my old rack had no good spot to attach a light to. Well, that, and it has a broken weld causing it to rattle. The rack I bought is this one. I got the Bontrager Flare 2, which easily attached to the rack with a single bolt. The light has 3 modes, which are steady, strobe, and random. Random works well if you'...


6

I use plastic waste baskets, mounted to rear rack by springs. The weight is low over rear tires, for extra stability.Just drill some drain holes and mounting holes through plastic containers, add cord loops, and attach springs to them. Adjust tilt so that pedal clearance is adequate in turns. P.s.Cable ties turn brittle in cold weather, so don't use them in ...


6

It shouldn't be too different to tapping out anything else, the added difficulty being that you would normally clamp the workpiece in a vice and you don't have that option. I'd take the wheel off and lie the bike down on a bench with scrapwood in place of the axle (try to clamp/screw it in place) to give you something to push against other than the frame. ...


6

It is (strongly) not advisable to put a rack on carbon. You could probably put a lock mount on the handlebar stem (I do). You could get an over-sized seat bag. Possibly a handlebar bag. Bottle cage bag but they don't have much capacity. They are good for like wallet, cell phone, and keys. Don't like to do product recommendations but ...


6

I suggest looking at frame bags. They don't carry much, but they have more capacity than the more sensible under-seat bags. You can get various sizes (up to 'fill the triangle'), and could even do both a frame bag and a seat bag. There's a cycle tourist with a carbon bike a bit heavier than yours here so it can be done. Most of the carbon bike people tape ...


6

Not really, just be careful. For example, you don't want the derailleur to hit the door or something when getting it in or out. You also don't really want to stack things on top of the bike, especially if you have no wheel in (e.g. at the fork). That being said, getting a bike in and out of a vehicle can be inconvenient, plus, it can get your car dirty. ...


6

One company that our city gets most of it's racks from is Dero. They have a variety of styles. Alternatively, Uline wave and u-shaped bike racks as suggested by Batman. My personal preference for racks is a bunch of U racks, a 'coathanger' style rack, or a wave rack in that order. I'm looking for a rack that I can ulock the frame to and secure both wheels ...


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