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1

No - the seatpost binder bolt is way too high for the design of most racks, and it is only a single point. The common solution is some stout P clips around the seat stays, one per side, ideally with a rubber backer, and these are bolted firmly to the nose of the rack. These should be just above the brake bridge, so there's something to stop them drifting ...


5

Before dual eyelets on the seatstays, using a single strut going to the seatstay bridge was common. Most racks either have the holes in the center for this or can be drilled. Then you flatten out a twisted strut with a vise or pliers and put a 90 degree bend in it at the end. Fine for all but heavy loads and much neater. And presuming this is some kind of ...


0

I’d try it, unless you need high reliability (e.g. because you are traveling in remote areas). If the welds break you can still get the aftermarket clamp. There is little load on the top attachment points of a rack. Most load is borne by the bottom attachment points.


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If the adjustments will allow, I would use the original clamp for the seatpost and the new add-on just for the rack. By using the new clamp just for the rack you can move it into any position to make the rack level including mounting the clamp upside down if need be to allow clearance for the seat quick release. You may want to limit the loads as most ...


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I've just bought a Giant front rack and have fitted it without too much difficulty. I had to slightly bend it to fit my (Giant) Revolt Advanced, but only slightly so no problem. I had to find a bolt with a smaller head to get it to clear the front wheel release, but that's worked ok. (Otherwise I'd have to take the rack off every time I removed the wheel) As ...


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