24

This is a standard quick release mechanism simply grab the lever indicated below and flip it the opposite direction (green arrow). At which point it should loosen up a bit, then you can spin it around to the left to unscrew it further. You do not have to take it all the way out, just loosen it enough to be able to slide the wheel out. You can also hold onto ...


19

Yes, you will need a rim tape to protect your inner tube from the spoke holes or the spokes in your rim. There are a few exceptions we come to later. The rim is the outer part of your wheel. Along its or circumference run two flanges to hold the tyre in place. Between the flanges is the rim bed. A rim tape usually needs to be in this bed. Thus can be a ...


15

That kind of rim damage indicates over-worn brake surfaces. Whether you should replace the whole wheel is a strictly economical question which is hard to answer in general. Wheel building services and components prices differ in different countries; somewhere it is cheap to rebuild a wheel at a mechanic; somewhere buying a new wheel is cheaper. Given that ...


14

Such a hub exists for trike and quads . Pedal forward with 3 or 5 gears then having a coaster brake to stop . At full stop with the brake engaged continued backward pedal pressure will cause the cycle will move in reverse in a reduced gear . Sturmey-Archer has made these hubs for the niche market (velomobiles ) for some years now . The hubs have a sprocket ...


13

That's called rim tape and it protects the tube from sharp edges in the rim and the ends of the spokes and spoke nipples. Without it you will get endless punctures. Most wheels come with rim tape installed, but you can buy it separately. It's not hard to install, you just have to make sure you get the right width for your rims: wide enough to cover the ...


13

You have the wrong tool. Your cassette lockring removal tool has a long pin emerging from its centre, which would fit inside the axle of a QR compatible wheel, to keep the tool centred. What you have named a skewer is actually the axle and yours is solid, so the axle blocks the tool. The correct and simple way to remove your cassette is to get an ...


11

There are bicycles with a crankshaft that runs through the rear axle. The "Tur Meccanica Bi Bici" is such a bicycle: I can't tell from your picture if it's the same bike or not, but it certainly could be.


11

That's a bit of a mess. Looks like the chain dinged up the hub, freehub body (that the cassette mounts on) and the spokes. The freehub body is removable, and you could possibly use a fine file to remove any metal burrs that are keeping the freehub from rotating. What is far more worrying is the state of the spokes. All the drive side spokes are gouged and ...


10

While it may be possible, by creating a mechanism that shifts the chain from one freewheel to another, or disconnecting one temporarily through mechanical actuators, the hassle and engineering it would take to make happen would be outweighed by the fact that it is almost entirely pointless. A fixed gear would be your best bet as it already does that. ...


9

Stop. Right now. You don’t have a skewer/quick release system, you have a solid threaded axle that is secured to the frame by nuts. A quick release axle has an axial hole through it for the quick release shaft. What you are trying to remove is the axle itself. This looks like a cup and cone type so if you remove the axle the ball bearings will all fall ...


8

I don't have specific experience with this one, but the pictures suggest it works one of two ways: From where you're at now, you bonk the end of the axle on the non-drive sufficiently hard and the axle slides out, possibly taking the freehub with it, or if not then letting it be removed. You put the 5mm allen in the drive side end and a cone wrench on the ...


8

If the shell is aluminum and we're talking about the whole thing and not just the bearing races, the literal answer is flat out no, because aluminum doesn't have a fatigue limit. It will crack eventually. As to the question of can a hub bearing race, real or hypothetical, last literally forever in any kind of use, that's the kind of question everyone likes ...


8

Thats just the adhesive from the old rim tape. Get a cloth and some rubbing alcohol and rub away, and it should look brand new.


8

This almost exclusively happens because of external cam quick release skewers not clamping the wheel tight enough. Bike manufacturers love them because they're light, cheap, work fine most of the time, and nobody ever questions them when buying a bike. But they never have as much clamping force as internal cam types, and the problem is exacerbated once they'...


7

Looks like an attaching point for some kind of trailer, maybe a single wheel trailer.


7

Most of times the axle is broken when not accurately jumping with bike (the same is with obstacles on road like holes and speed bumps). Wheels with freewheel are more exposed to this because their bearings (i.e. the place where wheel touching the axle) far from the place where the bike touch the wheel, therefor it have more moment to brake the axle. To the ...


7

If both bikes have a frame which is set up for it, with the long drop-out on the Thorn pictured below and the EX Box below it, then it would be the work of 5 minutes. Just unscrew (possibly by hand) that big nut on the ex-box, remove the wheel and put it onto the other bike. The only issue to remember is to always shift to the same gear (say, the lowest) ...


7

It sounds like the rear wheel shifted in the frame. Look closely at the axle where it connects to the frame at the dropouts, you may be able to see that it shifted. If you have the tools, loosen the nuts holding the rear wheel in place and you'll be able to recenter the wheel in the frame. As you recenter the wheel also pull back on it to keep tension on ...


7

This picture shows a slightly better angle. You need to first loosen the lock nut slightly, then spin the adjuster barrel until it unscrews right off the threaded rod on the chain. When you re-assemble you reverse that, and have to re-adjust the tension so that it shifts properly.


7

Your wheel axle is not aligned in the dropouts properly, causing the rim of the wheel to deviate to one side and contact the frame. I'm guessing you have horizontal or diagonal slotted dropouts and the drive side of the hub has been pulled forward by the force of the chain. You need to re-align the wheel. This video from Park Tool is about single speed ...


6

The outer ring looks like a lock ring. This should help you get it off:


6

They aren't necessary, but they are a great help to properly aligning your wheel in the dropouts in an efficient manner. If these screws are adjusted correctly, you'll be able to just put your wheel in, pull it all the way back and tighten your axle nuts and your wheel will be arrow straight in the frame. If not, You'll need to manually align your wheel each ...


6

By far the most likely reason is that you've over tightened the bearings. Did you feel as if you needed 3 hands to get it back together? If not, you did it wrong. :) As usual Sheldon has a pretty good writeup on this, but the basics are easy enough. Put one side back together, tighten it up as best you can. Set the cone on the other side to the correct ...


6

First off, the number one cause of broken spokes is not enough tension. When spokes aren't tight enough they load and unload with each revolution of the wheel – basically they are getting bent back and forth each time they go around. Over time they break, just like bending a paperclip. The most likely place for the spokes to break are at the bend at the hub. ...


6

Unfortunately 28mm nominal tire width can be too larger for many modern road bikes. Note that actual measured with depends on many factors including: internal rim width, tire construction, tire profile, tire age and wear, inflation pressure. As such, one combination of tires and wheels can work while another may fail if you have tight clearances. It is also ...


6

Bearing engineer piping in - technically you could have a 'forever' bearing using the right materials and lubrication - OR, change in envelope which increases the bearing capacity to the point where the applied radial, axial, and moment loads are so miniscule compared to capacity that they never wear. This method of survival is dependent on your seal being ...


6

Adjusting the bearing is quite easy although it's more than just unscrewing the 2.5mm hex-screw at the left side of the hub. Here's the link to an instruction sheet from Campagnolo. https://www.campagnolo.com/media/files/035_68_Technical%20manual_wheels_adjustment_hub%20Campagnolo_12-12.pdf While the PDF describes how to remove excessive play easing an ...


6

If the rear wheel is moving in the dropouts, its because the forces applied to the axle are larger than the clamping force of the retention system. You say its a Quick Release - the lever should require enough force to close that it leaves a mark on your skin. If you can't get it to tighten enough beforehand, the QR may have stretched and come to the end ...


6

The wheel you have has a solid axle, not a quick release. If you remove the locknut on the freewheel side, then slide spacer behind the locknut off the axle. You should now be able to get the freewheel tool on. You may have difficulty getting the locknut off without the locknut on the opposite side turning. If you have a cone wrench, fit that on the cone ...


5

I guess the derailleur hanger or the bit of frame it connects to must be bent. These can be bent back. Of course Sheldon Brown has some advice, but I'd be afraid to do this myself and instead take it to the LBS who will have the tools.


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