11

Serial Numbers Bicycles (except children's bicycles) are almost always required to have a frame or serial number. Some manufacturers use a date-code as part of the serial number. For example, a Brompton uses YYMMXXX as their serial code, so a Brompton with a serial number of 1306123456 was manufactured in 2013.06 or June 2013 Surly is another ...


10

Tyre Saver Small loop of wire attached so that it rubs continuously on the tyre as it rotates. This brushes off debris and reduces the number of punctures. These were popular mainly in the 1970's and 1980's, with the advent of lightweight puncture-resistant tyres they have almost disappeared.


10

There are at least four different places you can mount a kickstand. From left to right: Orange arrow: Rear axle kickstand. These come in one-sided and two-sided varieties. The one sided are not that stable and since your bike has what looks like a child carrier, I wouldn't recommended it. Axle mount kickstands are very popular on children's bicycles: The ...


8

Literature (old catalogues, fan websites, etc.) I managed to date my old Raleigh by finding scans of old catalogues online. That model was only sold in one particular year, but more often you'd get it to within a few years this way. There are many old cycling documents at Veteran-Cycle Club Online Library, including plenty that can be accessed for free. ...


7

Spoke The spokes connect the hub of a wheel to its rim. Spokes are secured to the rim by a spoke nipple. They insert into the hub at its flanges. Spoke count is the number of spokes in a wheel, and a higher spoke count usually means a stronger wheel that can handle more weight and abuse. Spoke tension (the force with which the spokes are tightened) can be ...


7

Welded Frame A frame made by melting the tubes it is built from at the joins, typically with a similar metal added as filler. Mass produced aluminium and steel frames are almost all built this way as with modern machines it is very fast and cheap.


6

Brazed Frame see also lugged frame and welded frame A method of joining steel frame parts together by melting brass into the joins between frame tubes. Frames can be fillet brazed or use lugs, which are extra, normally cast steel, parts that the frame tubes slot into before brazing. Lugs make building a strong frame easier, provided you have exactly the ...


6

Bonk An expression used by cyclists to describe sudden fatigue or loss of energy while exercising. Also known as crashing, blowing up, or running out of steam/gas/fuel, or empty tank. The phenomenon applies to all endurance sports. In running, it may be called hitting the wall. Glycogen is a form of glucose that our bodies use as fuel. It is stored in the ...


6

Thru Axles / Through Axles These axles secure your wheels to the frame and fork. Historically, bicycles have used quick releases that clamp the dropouts. However, the forces generated by disc brakes can cause wheels to come out of the dropouts if the quick release is not secured properly. Thru axles are an alternative. They insert into the dropout on one ...


6

Indexed and Electronic Shifting Shimano introduced Shimano Indexed Shifting (SIS) in 1984. If a bicycle has indexed shifters, then it is model year 1985 or later -- assuming that the shifters and derailleurs haven't been replaced. The first Shimano Di2 electronic shifters were introduced on a production bicycle by Giant in 2009.


6

Ask the Seller/Owner A simple thing if you're receiving a bike is to ask the person selling it. Take their info with a grain of salt though - some sellers may lie to increase the perceived value of a bike. However if someone gives you a bike, they might say "I remember my dad riding this to work in the 80s while I was at school" So this information may ...


5

Cage/Bottle Cage/Bottle Holder Water bottle cages hold water bottles on a bike frame. They can be made of steel, aluminum, carbon, or titanium. Most cages attach to the frame via preinstalled threaded holes that are usually called bosses or mounts. Most modern frames have at least two bottle cage mounts, one on the seat tube and one on the down tube. Some ...


5

Cable Pull Many brakes and most derailleurs are actuated by pulling cables. Cable pull is how far the cable moves when the brake lever is pulled, or a shift lever is actuated. For brakes, there are two main standards, short or conventional pull and long or V brake pull. Road bikes have tended to use short pull levers, although current Shimano road brakes ...


5

Dropout In the context of bicycles dropouts are a kind of fork end, where the wheels are attached. Dropouts are employed on most bikes; on some mountain bikes the axles pass through holes at the end of the forks. We often use dropout for any slot to hold the axle at the end of forks, but strictly speaking, a dropout is a fork end where the wheel can be ...


5

Spider The part that connects the cranks to the chain rings. Historically, most spiders have had 5 legs, and the crank arms and the spider are forged as one piece. With some cranks, the spider is constructed independently of the crank arm, and it mounts to a splined mount on the crank. Sometimes, the chainring(s) and spider may be constructed in one piece, ...


5

Pump Peg A pump peg is a small protrusion on a bike frame which is intended to facilitate the mounting of a "frame pump". Depending on the style of the frame, the peg may be positioned to allow the pump to fit on the underside of the top tube (of a standard diamond frame) or on the trailing side of the down tube. The peg is designed to mate with ...


5

Mountain Bike Often abbreviated as MTB. A bike with sturdier wheels (usually 26" or 29") and wider tires - around 2" wide - meant for riding off-road. Mountain bikes commonly come with only front suspension (hard tail), front and rear suspension (full suspension) or no suspension (rigid). A rare configuration is the soft tail where the frame ...


5

Lugged Frame also lugs A method of frame-building where at least the major joints consist of frame tubes inserted into castings (the lugs). For steel frames, lugs are hand-made by bending and filing rather than casting. Lugged frames are normally brazed, but can also be soldered (with lead or silver rather than brass) and occasionally glued (the Windcheetah ...


5

Style of Shifter (friction shifter, brifter, grip shifter) Downtube or handlebar mounted friction shifters were common on bicycles until the early 1980s when indexed shifting was introduced by Shimano in 1984 (see Indexed Shifting). Mountain bike trigger shifters were introduced by ... in ... The first Grip Shifters were introduced by SRAM in 1989 for ...


5

Freewheel or Cassette (Freehub) If your bicycle uses a cassette freehub for the rear sprockets, then it was likely made in the late 1980s or later. Shimano came out with the first commercial freehub in 1978 in the Dura-Ace series, but it took about a decade for it to make significant inroads. Like many other technologies, cheaper bicycles (and notably, ...


4

Q-Factor This is the distance (in millimetres) between the outside faces of your crank arms. Effectively, a larger Q factor means your pedals are further away from the bike's center line, and therefore your feet are further apart. A narrow Q-Factor is considered more aerodynamic, but increases the risk of chaffing the inner thigh on the nose of your ...


4

Dropper Posts Dropper posts are more commonly found on Mountain Bikes and allow the rider to quickly compress or extend the seat post using a remote lever (mounted on the bars). Cables to the post can be routed either through the frame (if the frame allows) or along any of the cable eyelets. In traditional use, the remote lever for the seat post takes the ...


4

Rim Tape For clincher type rims and tires with inner tubes: tape applied to the inside of the wheel rim to protect the inner tube from sharp edges and the ends of the spokes and spoke nipples, which would otherwise abrade the tube and cause punctures. For tubeless clincher rims and tires: tubeless rim tape covers the spoke holes and seals the inside of the ...


4

Play Play is a technical descriptive word for sloppiness in joints: Play is movement in a mechanism that results from one or more moving mechanical parts where the fit is less than perfect. Also known as "backlash" though that term is more common in a drivetrain or chain system. Play also increases over time as mechanical parts like axles, shafts and ...


4

Single-speed This means a bike that has exactly one rear cog, and cannot change gear. Very similar to a fixed-gear bike except a single-speed has a freewheel mechanism to allow coasting, i.e. riding along without pedalling. Compare with Fixed-Gear.


4

Chain guard/Chain cover It's a frame, usually made of plastic or metal, that covers the entire length of the chain or only the upper part, mainly for protecting the rider from the dirt and lubricant on the chain, but can also protect the chain itself.


4

Cottered Cranks The use of cottered cranks was popular on bikes until the mid to late 1970s until they were replaced by square taper and splined bottom bracket designs. Raleigh, for example, introduced square tapers on some models in 1973 and phased cotters out on all their models around 1978. Like many things, the shift to square tapered and splined ...


4

Mongoose specific if you have mongoose this may be if some help.. https://shop.re-rides.com/blogs/news/mongoose-serial-number-for-bmx-mid-school-new-school Older Mongoose bikes made through the 1980’s had pretty easy serial numbers. Generally the year and month of build was stamped as the first part of the serial number. For example my 1986 Mongoose Expert ...


4

There are a wide variety of kickstands available, my guess is you would likely be able to find one that would fit. If the frame doesn't have a crossbar and hole behind the bottom bracket for a center mount kickstand, you could likely use an adjustable rear mount, they make some that are compatible with disc brakes and this is likely what you would need. ...


3

Stack Height The stack height of a headset is the vertical space taken up by a headset, and the stem when using a threadless headset. It's the difference between the headtube length and the fork steerer length needed to be able to use that headset with that fork and headtube. http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/fork-column-length-and-sizing http://...


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