9

Carbon is seen as expensive and light while Aluminum is heavier and cheaper. Both are, to all practical purposes, more than robust enough for the job. At the price point you are looking at (for a hard tail), Carbon is a no brainier and superior in every way. If you are worried about failure mode, both are as likely to fail catastrophically as each other, ...


9

how does a higher fork contribute to higher stress in the frame? By creating a longer lever, and stretching the end of that lever to a greater angle, it transmits more force to the bottom of the head tube (the part of the frame where the steer tube passes through). This can cause damage to the head tube itself or where it joins both the down tube and top ...


7

I've been looking into this a lot, and asking around at local bike shops, as I'm looking into getting a modern road bike. In terms of failure - both aluminium and carbon are quite brittle, compared to steel, and from what I've heard (all non substantiated) they are both about as failure prone as each other nowadays. Steel can also fail remember! I'd be ...


6

I happen to own two almost identical mountain bikes other than frame. One aluminum (Orbea) with Niner carbon font fork. And the other an all carbon Niner with Niner carbon front fork. I was looking for a Niner carbon frame and found a whole bike at such a deal I bought it. Both are single speed and tubeless. The all carbon has 2.1 tires compared 2.25 on ...


5

There's no point replacing the fork. A better fork will be more robust but replacing a major component is not cost effective. A better fork will cost a significant fraction of the whole bike as a separate component. If you want a better fork you should have spent the money buying a higher spec bike in the first place. Wider tires are relatively inexpensive ...


5

The markings on the tires for the pressures can be essentially ignored. They're a combination of marketing and legal departments coming up with essentially arbitrary numbers. Find a set of pressures that works for you so the tires are properly inflated -- it should prevent pinch flats, but keep rolling resistance low and absorb road hazards and ...


3

I have seen videos of an aluminum frame snapping at the weld where the front vertical shaft (where the fork is mounted to) shears off the two horizontal/crossbars. Though these people were doing lots of big jumps on their mountain bikes. I think you will have issues with snapping in either case. A number of factors come into play here. Material quality (...


3

As for crashworthiness: Materials which yield before failure absorb more energy. Cars pass major crash tests because they are made of cold rolled steel. That property reduces the G load on the victims like nothing else. The material property most closely related to energy absorption ability is called elongation. Elongation is what happens before the ...


2

Determining the weakest point is impossible to say. What is going to fail first will depend on the terrain, speed and the aggressiveness of your riding style. If you are new to mountain biking your perception of what is rough ground will be far different than that of a more experienced rider. So just ride it until something fails. You have what is best ...


1

One thing to keep in mind is the availability of parts. I have a Dahon in Tokyo and the local bike shops there don't always have the 20" tubes and have to order away. You might want to bring a couple of inner tubes (and depending on how long you're there, some tires). Also, while in Tokyo I broke a folding pedal off my Dahon. This is one of the weak ...


1

Unfortunately, I think this bike would be a poor choice for a number of reasons. First, the small wheel size will accentuate the bad road conditions. Larger wheels will seem to smooth out the bumps a bit better. As has already been commented, folding bikes in general do not handle particularly well, which is not what you want on bumpy streets. Although this ...


1

One question is whether carbon fiber is the right material for let us say BMX frames. GT made a nice looking box beam frame called the UB2. The problem was that the factory riders would not ride it and went back to aluminum, at least for a time, because what they said UB2 was sluggish, especially out of the gate. Having recently learned about this complaint, ...


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