Hot answers tagged

58

Cables: The main difference that I am aware of is the diameter of the cable. Most brake cables are 1.5 or 1.6mm in diameter. Most shift cables are 1.1 or 1.2mm, galvanized shifter cables are 1.3mm. I'm sure that there is a lot of science behind the difference but I'll leave that to someone else. One major difference in MTB vs road BRAKE cable is the ...


54

The above video shows how to fit a tight tire / rim combination. Although it shows the Marathon Plus tire, it applies to any tire. The crucial point he makes on the video is that the tire bead doesn't stretch and is the limiting factor in getting the tire on. Thus you need to push the bead into the well of the rim on the sides opposite to the last bit you'...


36

The "cement" used in tire tube patch kits (de)vulcanizes the rubber in the patch and of the tube. Which is a chemical process, usually using sulfur, where the rubbers bond and form a stronger bond than just an adhesive would do. Rubber cement is just a gooey adhesive. Usually latex with acetone and other chemicals to make it more pliant. You wouldn't want ...


27

I volunteer at a community bike shop. We take old donated bikes and fix them up for sale, so I have a lot of experience with this exact dilemma. Here are a few reasons why I will stop working on a bike I am refurbishing: Frame has worse than just surface rust: i.e. extensive pitting and / or holes. Seized parts, especially if they need replacing. Sometimes ...


26

That's not the correct skewer for the wheel. I think you likely are using the rear skewer in the font wheel. Front hubs are typically 100mm between the drop-outs, rear are 130 or 135mm (or even 145mm on some mountain bikes that have stronger through-axle designs).


23

It's safer and way easier just to buy another MissingLink (KMC's name for their master link design) of the same type (pin length) the chain came with, leaving you with an inner link that has one on either end. They're around $2US. In addition to saving the trouble of getting the pin back in there, there's also the question of the integrity of modern outer ...


22

If the bike has been hanging rather than sitting with weight on the tyres (and hence damaging the sidewalls), there is a good chance the tyres are still ok. You can check the tyres by going around and looking for hairline cracks in the rubber and feeling if the rubber is brittle/flaky. If they look ok then go ahead and inflate them and recheck the ...


20

Minimally, you want to be able to tighten all of the bolts on your bike (likely a few hex keys will do this) and an appropriate screwdriver for adjusting derailer & brake pulls. Separate from a multi-tool, a pair of tire levers are the other tool you should carry with you. I would add a chain tool to the above list after being left in a state where I ...


20

They are both types of rubber cement but not the same MSDS will tell you a lot One difference is tire uses a mainly naphtha as a solvent and the elmers does not. Park MSDS Elmers MSDS Looked up a couple other vulcanizing fluids and the commonality is the use naphtha as a solvent. According to this link naphtha is also rubber solvent. A bicycle tube ...


19

In my experience: You only need to apply a drop of glue a bit larger than a pea (about 7mm diameter) per patch; Glue inside eventually dries. If you only have a puncture once a year, most probably the glue remaining from the last puncture would be dry "no matter what". Also, there is an expiration date of around two years, but I think it's two years if you ...


19

Note: this calculation makes many assumptions, so it's only useful in an 'average use case', not some sort of exact measurement. If you find better information, please post it and I'll update the answer. How many pumps you would need to fill up a tire depends on many variables. First, the volume of your inner tube, which can be approximated as a torus (...


18

I'd recommend not taking a chance you'll miss something and take it by your local bike shop. They have a tool that can correctly re-align a bent hanger...this is much more likely then the derailleur being bent. Also, the mechanics have looked at tons of bikes up close and will notice little things that you might miss. Many LBSs will do a post crash check for ...


17

Your best bet is to use mechanical advantage to your benefit. What you want to do is line the wrench up with the opposite crank, so that your hands are as close together as possible, now straddle the frame and force the two apart. Here's an image from Park's description of how to remove a pedal that illustrates it well: The worst position for the wrench is ...


17

It's doable although it doesn't make sense from a cost perspective. Only do it if you have an emotional investment in the bike or want a fun project that will teach you a lot about bike mechanics. To give you an idea, I bought a 1975 Peugeot UO18 Mixte (a woman's road bike, perhaps similar to your mom's) that had been stored in a barn and turned it into my ...


17

If the nuts are rounded they're stuffed. You want to remove the nuts but not damage other things, like axles. I'll assume you're talking about axle nuts, but the same ideas apply to all nuts, bolts, and even screws to some extent. So your nuts look something like this: Clean the flats up with a file. Use a medium flat file and smooth off the lumps of ...


17

Bicycles cost money to maintain. Even if you do all your own mechanic work, you still need to purchase parts. That being said, more expensive bikes are generally more expensive to maintain at the level you bought them at. By this I mean you can purchase a replacement derailleur (of roughly the same quality) for a $250 for perhaps $10 to $20. If you had ...


17

Looking at manufacturers site I found repair kit with 'mysterious' blue mesh listed as "Cartridge freeze protector". It is supposed to be put over the cartridge (like in this picture) to prevent skin irritation/burn because CO2 gets very cold when discharged.


16

Lengthening the wrench is your best bet. You don't need anything fancy, find a bit of pipe at your local hardware shop that fits over the wrench. Watch your fingers. While trying to remove a tricky pedal, it gave suddenly and my knuckles hit the teeth of the chain ring. It was a daft and bloody mistake.


16

From personal experience, I'd say a larger-than-usual hole in the tire could have these undesireable side-effects: The tube might get a bit exposed, and the day-to-day rolling over the hole might wear it down until the tire eventually flats out. Chemical aggresion from road grime or mud could also be involved. The fabric of the tire might get damaged to the ...


16

That's a pinhead security fastener. You should have got a key to match with the bike. Without the matching key number you can't get a replacement key either. Here's a picture of a pinhead key fom about 2010. Yours will look at bit different. The key number is under the red blob, and the pins to mate with the nut are in the silver bit on the right. As you ...


16

This kind of failure is basically the reason sticker-type patches have a reputation for not being reliable. Scrupulously sanding the area and getting it as clean as possible (ie, with alcohol or other residue-free solvent, cleaner than anyone can probably get it on the side of the road) wards off the problem but doesn't eliminate it. Sticker type patches ...


15

Some things to check and I'm assuming you're running V-brakes: My first guess is that the brake cable inside the brake cable housing is sticking. Some light oil on the cable could help. (WD40 is a solvent, do not use it on cabling or chains and do not use it where you want to maintain lubrication on parts. Look for some light oil like TriFlow, or whatever ...


15

This type of problem has 5 likely causes, listed in order of elimination. Bent dérailleur hanger, or Bent derailleur cage. (Your derailleur hanger looks straight, but the cage appears slightly twisted in the upper photo. Could be the angle of the shot, though.) Edit: This turned out to be the correct answer, after all. Bent, twisted, or sticky chain link. ...


15

Generally, if you are using an inner tube in the tire, you should replace the tire if there is more than a 2 millimeter cut in the tire casing. Not in the rubber, mind, but it the threaded cloth casing that your rubber bits are laid on to. I personally err on the side of replacement rather than risking a serious injury from a blow out at a bad time, so I ...


15

This article titled, How to Get the Pin Back Into a Bike Chain, will give you a step by step guide on how to put the pin back in a bike chain. Edit: I'm copying the article just in case the link ever becomes broken (no pun intended). The information below is from felixarizona.com Edit 2: I removed the content that can be found here for possible copyright ...


14

"Nothing is so broken you cannot make it worse" - breaking a perfectly good chain in the field, miles from nowhere, with a light weight emergency tool, would be my very last resort. This will only work if the broken end is not too frayed. Remove the cable completely from the outers and the shifter. Thread the cable though the barrel adjuster on the ...


14

If your question is, "Can an amateur successfully true a wheel on their first try?", the answer is "Yes". A quick search on the internet reveals plenty of videos explaining the process. Some things to consider: Make sure you fully understand the process before you start Don't use excessive force and take your time Use a spoke wrench Make small adjustments ...


14

You'll need to very carefully inspect the area around the boss that's been ripped out, as well as your usual second hand frame check. If the bike was ridden after the damage cracks could easily have spread and you might be well on the way to a two piece seat tube. This groove could be the start of a problem, but it's probably just a scar from where the cage ...


13

Like Daniel Hicks says, they are threaded opposite to each other. This ensures the act of you pedaling is constantly tightening them both. If they were both the usual right hand threads then the left pedal would eventually unscrew and fall off. So, if you're like me and use the right hand rule to constantly assess which direction you should be turning ...


13

Right solution is to use the "tight link removal" position of most chain tools: Just choose the side where the pin is showing most outwards, and pull it in a tiny bit. This is very subtle, and your link will be released. An alternate solution is to grab the chain with both hands (dirty!) and force it as if you were to bend it sideways, in both directions. ...


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