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1

I would say that the cap is done for. If you have any penetrating oil (or even GT85/WD40), I'd spray this around the cap. Penetrating oil can degrade plastic over time, but this cap is fairly ruined anyway. After this, I would carefully drill a small hole in the top of the cap, a couple of millimeters in from the edge, just big enough to put one side of your ...


4

Back in fall I discussed it with my friend who is a material engineer and he thought we should try to repair it at least for the exercise. So we glued it back together with some kind of epoxy. Before the winter I couldn't get a replacement part and actually put it back on the bike and rode about 150 km with the repaired part. However, this it not something I ...


15

The chainstay has been crimped (at the time of manufacture) to provide extra clearance for the chain rings. On some bikes, I’ve seen this clearance provided by having the bottom-bracket end of the chainstay be a solid plate (thinner than the chainstay tube). The bike almost certainly came with a multi-gear crankset when new.


3

In a cycle shop, it is not uncommon for people with carbon or aluminium frames to come in with the problem that one of the bottle cage bolts has corroded and become stuck in the rivnut, or crossthreaded and stuck so they both turn together. In this instance, the shop does what it can to remove the bolt (this is often time consuming) before drilling out the ...


10

Well I'm all done - some things that would be better done differently. Use a quality 8mm spanner. Mine was a bit sloppy, and I've rounded off the nut that enters the caliper. It took a lot more applied force to do up, because the olive needs to be deformed. Expect to do a brake bleed. I took care to work up high, above the level of the lever, and ...


11

Sounds good to me! Just a few more pointers: You’re going to have to bleed the system for sure, so don’t be too worried about losing fluid. Hopefully you have enough excess hose to make such a repair. That’s quite a bit cut off. The insert (brass pin) is delicate. Careful when pushing it in, as it may require a bit of force — it likely won't just slip in. ...


3

There are very great risks in truing wheels, but none of those is related to a truing stand. If a spoke is on the brink of failure (especially likely on a used wheel of unknown build quality since the spokes may not have been stress relieved initially, but can happen on a new wheel because new spokes can have undetected manufacturing defects that would have ...


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