New answers tagged

-1

There is no easy or readily available option for this problem. In my professional opinion, you should consider replacing this frame. However, there are options if you really want to keep using this frame. Ditch hollowtech and use a threadless square taper bb. Bond the shimano hollowtech cup to the frame. Weld and re-thread Threadless BB thread to eachother ...


2

You don't say specifically what your set up problems are but when training mechanics we recommend starting with the fundamentals and then working upwards, not skipping steps or assuming that things are correct, that may later prove not to be. That potentially saves you from a lot of lost time trying to get something to work where you have an undetected, ...


3

The H-screw aka b-tension aka angle adjustment is meant to be adjusted in the lowest gear position for any rear derailleur where the guide pulley is offset from the cage pivot, which is most of them, including this. The manufacturer recommended distance will always be for that position. For conventional road derailleurs like this, that 5mm number really ...


1

So I reshaped it and it stays on the axle body now. Thank you everyone for your advice.


1

As Grigory already said, master links for 8 and 9-speed chains can often be opened or closed by hand. I believe this is because the clearances between the chain components (e.g. the pins and rollers) are larger than on higher-speed chains. One minor thing about the original question struck me: the poster referred to pedaling their bike upside down. This ...


6

The master link on the picture looks properly closed. Master links for 8- and 9-speed chains often do not require tools to open them, while 10/11/12/13-speed chains are better approached with special pliers. Be, of course, sure that you use a master link that matches your chain and is not too wide, e.g. an 8-speed one for 8-speed chain, 9-speed for 9-speed ...


3

The derailleur in the first photo doesn't appear to be mounted correctly. See how there's a big gap between the axle and dropout slot? I think you should just go with a regular, bolt-on derailleur. Non-replaceable hangers are usually found on steel frames (check yours with a magnet) and are perfectly fine to use. With steel, you can just bend it back into ...


3

Should my pedal be this shape or is it bent? Yes, your pedal is bent. I drew some straight lines on your photo to illustrate the places I see bends. "Side A" is bowed in toward the pedal axle. "Side B" - the ends are bent toward the crank arm. In a more direct top down picture I think it would be clearer that your pedal is no longer a ...


1

If I am viewing this correctly, the backplate is bent inward, which would pull the other parts of the pedal out of alignment. You could try to straighten things out. I don't think that would make the situation worse. But this is not an expensive pedal, and replacing it would be a faster, easier, and complete solution.


-1

What is the most professional training one could take to become a bicycle technician? Why won't you ask the place where you plan to be employed? They most likely have some criteria for employment, and asking them directly instead of guessing incorrectly is a good plan. Bicycles are one of the simplest mechanical devices, and thus, they are repairable even ...


2

There is an accreditation from Cytech that is recognised in several countries around the world. https://www.cytech.training/


2

I had the same problem with an XT SPD pedal. Using your magnet idea, I used my magnetized parts dish to hold the adjuster bolt in place on the bracket. I then set the springs in place and everything just sits in place through the magic of magnets. I removed the body cover plate to prevent any spring tension on the bracket so I could slide the long bolt ...


3

Since you’ve stated in a comment that you live in Austria, I think the only specialised education for bicycle mechanics in Austria is an apprenticeship: https://www.berufslexikon.at/berufe/2898-FahrradmechanikerIn/ (Austrian job encyclopaedia) In practice I think what matters most is experience (and of course taking your time, checking things, following ...


2

If you want to learn on your own, the Park Tool Company Repair Help website has a comprehensive collection of high quality, detailed articles and videos. Along with reading and watching you need actual practical experience. If you want 'professional' training look for bicycle repair courses at local community colleges or adult education centers. Some bike ...


1

Proper qualifications do exist, for example the New Zealand Certificate in Bicycle Mechanics. But like many training courses in this world, the proof's in the doing more than the bookwork. I'd suggest you start by looking around your area for a bike cooperative and volunteer some time. A couple of large well-known co-ops are: https://www.thehubbikecoop.org/ ...


1

Unfortunately the mechanic didn't express the issue very well to you, or used vocabulary that you haven't come across before, but the best person to ask for clarification is that mechanic. He is the only one of us who has been hands on with the bike. I would expect normal headset adjustment to be part of a tune up, and the fact you say he tightened something,...


1

The tube you’ve circled is the head tube. Inside the tube, on the top and bottom are the headset bearings which allow your fork to turn smoothly. The bearing play or preload has to be set correctly with the vertical screw on top of the stem cap. If there is play in the bearings allowing the fork to rock back and forth you’ll have to adjust the preload. To do ...


1

Easy. A good mini pump (such as the Quickex Quicker Pro which I have and which unfortunately isn't available for sale anymore) will pump a tire hundreds if not thousands of times. Thus, by carrying a pump instead of a CO2 kit I'm not limiting how many flats I can fix. A Rema Tip Top TT04 Sport kit has 6 patches. It weighs 18 grams. Thus, 3 grams per puncture....


0

You cannot use a 'threadless' bottom bracket in a threaded shell. Perhaps you are thinking of two-piece bottom brackets designed for press-fit frames that thread together and are designed to eliminate bearing misalignment and creak. These only work because they fit very accurately into the press-fit bearing cups. The 127[.5] measurement refers to axle length....


0

I have the habit of breaking the ball bearings within my pedals. On the regular (yearly) check by the local bike shop I would buy new pedals, have them installed and be without the click for a few months. You can test whether it is this by putting no power on the pedal you want to test but still have it go round. If the ball bearing is broken it will ...


1

I had a loose spoke on the rear wheel that cause or seemed to cause the drive train to creak on every pedal going up hill or under load. Easy fix.


0

It's pretty simple and only requires an Allen wrench. Loosen with the Allen wrench from where it's attached in the back of the post, recenter the brakes, and tighten. You can fine-adjust from each caliper's side-screw if needed, but you may not need to. A bit more detail in the middle minute of this video (linked from this article.)


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