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2

That little rubber piece is indeed the check valve. The protrusion (on one side) fits down into the hole in the base (where the pressure gauge screws in) and prevents reverse flow.  I cleaned up the corrosion in the base, and it works great ! Failing that, I could have simply spliced a check-valve into the hose. I'm advised that the thread in the base "...


2

When only the last 20 cm section of the tire remains on the "wrong" outer side of the rim (and on one side only), pushing one end of this section with the lifter into the right position results another end slipping back into wrong one. This looks like a rather pointless activity but it is not so: the tire somehow settles better as the pushed ...


6

Something is probably broken for a ball to escape - my guess is the axle, unless the bearings have collapsed. You probably won't do more harm by wheeling it. Cost will be a new axle and balls or a new wheel, and maybe 20-30 minutes labour (I have no idea what shops charge these days).


7

We're not really able to give costs sorry. Your best bet is to telephone the shop and ask "what would a rear hub rebuild cost ?" Your bike shop could charge anything up to two hours of mechanic time, which is in the range of $50 to $250/hour. The parts cost is minimal - I'd expect them to replace all the bearing balls on both sides, and the balls ...


2

I'm nowhere near as experienced as some of the gurus on here but it sounds like it should be safe to push the bike if just one, or just a small number fell out. Push gently and stop if the wheel "skews". Ring around a few bike shops in your country to get an idea of costs. If you find that too expensive, consider doing it yourself, it's not ...


3

A problem occasionally seen with some tire/rim combinations is that the rim has a very narrow trough through the center and unless the rim bead is nestled deeply into that trough the last few inches of bead cannot be stretched over the edge of the rim. This scenario often takes careful planning.


4

Put the tyre on as much as you can (ie. bead in the rim all the way round as far around as possibly) hopefully leaving you with a small section that seems too small. Now put the wheel on your feet, with the section of tyre that seems too small facing away from you and bend the tyre over the top, towards you, with your hands/fingers gripped over the top and ...


10

There are a few things I've found helpful when dealing with stubborn tires: Make sure ALL of the air is out of the inner tube. Squeeze the tire beads together towards the center of the rim, opposite of the part that won't go on. The center channel is deeper, so this will give some room to pull the tire away from the rim slightly. This may be enough to let ...


8

This happens sometimes and I don't have an explanation for it. It is not a sign that you bought the wrong thing. Sometimes the tube just seems like it has extra diameter, even when it's inflated only enough to give it shape. You want the tube to be in the tire without being folded over or bunched up. Those conditions can create stress risers that lead to ...


2

That looks like the mangled remains of a ball bearing cage. Having been munched and ejected means there's possibly damage to the bearing balls, or that the cone has backed out enough to let this cage fit through. I would remove the freewheel (tool needed) and then use some spanners and cone-wrenches to reset the preload on the bearings. They should spin ...


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