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The misalignment may be caused by damage to inside of one of the shifter mechanism components you circled on the photo. They all stack up on a center post, and some have interlocking components to align everything just right. If one of these components is damaged (i.e. stripped out, chipped, etc.) it would not stop at the correct position, and keep rotating ...


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Is it feasible to repair a crack in a frame around the seatpost clamp? Being an aluminium frame I understand soldering is problematic This is very typical of aluminum frames and in fact is the reason why I don't recommend aluminum frames (and forks) to be used. Instead, double butted chromium molybdenum steel (chromoly) wouldn't have this problem. Aluminum ...


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It IS possible to repair this. It is possible to repair practically EVERYTHING that is man-made. Although it is impossible to say how cost-effective or how easy it will be by just looking at a couple of pictures, I would be confident that this frame could be repaired well and fairly cheaply. Yes, I'm one of those that hate the throw-away society we've ...


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I'm not too familiar with the style of thru-axle you have in there right now. Most are effectively just plain old bolts with an internal hex fitting on either end. The DT Swiss RWS axle you have as the new one is a proven alternative. It does look to be some kind of expansion plug-type thing though, so try giving the lever a good whack with a hammer. Perhaps ...


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It does not look good. You may be better letting a shop give it a shot vs. risking damaging anything else. I am sure a good shop has seen this more than any of us here and will be able to try to get it out without damaging anything else along the way. In the forums I saw it seemed like some drastic things had to happen like cutting hubs, etc.


5

Summary You can ride it as is if you are okay with the risk, repair it with carbon fibre composite either yourself or get it done by a professional, or you can have a professional repair it by welding. Risk analysis of riding it as is: Has been like that for a long time and didn't break: That's really one of the strongest and easiest to verify arguments: ...


8

To be clear, I would not recommend riding that frame as-is. The clamps of the kickstand probably added rigidity, by removing it the bike will be weaker. If one or both chainstays part then handling will change abruptly, dropping the pedals and BB down toward the road and putting a lot of stress on the chainstays which will bend immediately. The chain ...


10

The only thing that can be done to save the frame is to have patches welded over the holes. You would need the expertise of a professional welder to get it done properly so that the frame is made structurally sound. Unfortunately, you may find that this repair is more expensive than simply finding a similar replacement bike or frame. The welding repair job ...


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