34

Warranties exist to protect you, the consumer, against defects in materials or workmanship, not against deliberate damage. The purpose of a bike lock is to help avoid your bike being stolen, so if it has prevented a theft of the bicycle then it has done its job well. Perhaps you can ask Decathlon and report back to us by answering your own question for ...


22

If the bike has been hanging rather than sitting with weight on the tyres (and hence damaging the sidewalls), there is a good chance the tyres are still ok. You can check the tyres by going around and looking for hairline cracks in the rubber and feeling if the rubber is brittle/flaky. If they look ok then go ahead and inflate them and recheck the ...


21

Generally it's absolutely fine to buy a relatively new bike, and not worry about component availability. Bicycles are not like cars that have specific components for each model, or at best some component sharing across a manufacturers models. In general, practically all bicycle components are standardized so that bicycles can be built up (or modified) with ...


17

Some locks offer "insurance" where you can get a payout if their lock fails to protect your bike. Of course there are caveats like "lock must be used" and "thief must leave lock behind" (for inspection for weakness) and so on, and even "lock must be registered with company" The only places that can tell you details would be the supplier and the ...


13

Yes. The cassette teeth are clearly worn, and the large chainring teeth have worn into characteristic shark fin shape. If you use new chain with these, it will skip. The small chainring looks still good.


12

Here's how I would fix the problem. This could all be done by somebody with basic tools and basic knowledge. Get a quill-threadless stem adapter and a new stem. This will allow you to fit the new stem to the handlebars without removing anything from the bars. The old stem can be removed destructively by removing the cinch bolt and prying the thing apart ...


12

Shimano seems to keep a lot of their documentation online, you can find your specific manual there. For example, the site gives this picture for DEORE XT RD-M8000 derailleur. Essentially, the chain needs to follow the shortest path between the two jockey wheels. When installed properly, the chain won't touch the plate at all. If it does you've routed ...


12

The Giant Reign is a long travel 'enduro' bike that is designed to be ridden down steep technical trails, not pedalled down road/fire trail. It's most likely that changing to a 39-53 will not work as the inner chainring will catch the chain stays, and even if it did work, it would compromise the bike in technical terrain, increasing the chances of '...


12

It still doesn't hurt to contact the manufacturer, but do not talk to as if they owe you anything. Do an open inquiry and see if there's anything they can do. Companies can actually do things out of the ordinary and isn't only bound by warranties. Maybe they'll want your lock back to examine how it survived a theft and give you a replacement.


10

There is a trick: The pads need some "persuasion" to get past the spring clip. Here is a side view of the pads and the spring clip showing how the pads nest within the steel clip. This should make obvious why a little force is required to get the pads to move fully into the caliper. After much frustration, I finally looked at the pad and the clip in that ...


10

What you have now is a bit of a hack, but it could be good temporarily so long as you don't over-stress things somehow, and if you can tolerate the lower handlebar. (Note, I haven't seen how your stem is cracked and so can't tell how bad the situation is.) It's not likely to fail catastrophically (so long as you're not hot-dogging on the thing) but the ...


10

You can often use the chain tool to drive the half-way inserted pin back out from the chain. I do not think it is advisable to attempt pressing it in again. It is certainly possible, I did re-pressed regular roller pins a couple of times when I or someone else accidentally pressed them out too far so that they fell off. It is not the most enjoyable ...


9

When you remove all the thorns very carefully you could keep using the tire. Unfortunately this might be some hassle with 30+ thorns and you can not be a 100% sure that you really have removed all of them. Also some may have broken off in a way that you see the remains from neither inside nor outside but the remains may be pushed further inside after some ...


9

tl;dr: Yes, you can pretty much buy any seat except some rare/expensive racing or classic leather seats. Explanation: As long as your seat attaches by two parallel rails that are 44mm apart (which is 95% of seats), then you can replace it with another seat that also attaches by the rails. In case you don't do metric, 44mm is just under 1.75 inches measured ...


9

You should not have to replace the entire crank-set. In general, a 'mid-compact' 52/36 crank will have a 110mm BCD spider, which allows 50 and 34 tooth rings to be installed. The Ultegra FC-R8000 crank on the Canyon comes in 53-39, 52-36 and 50-34 versions, so you will be able to get the smaller rings for that specific crank. The front derailleur may need ...


9

This is often called "the slippery slope of knock-on upgrades" which can get expensive quickly. There are two simple and relatively cheap upgrades to try. Replace the brake pad inserts with modern compound Kool Stop. They will brake better than the original ones, which may also be a bit hardened with age. There will be a model that fits your brake pad ...


9

I agree with Andy P. If the tires are hanging, then I would check the side walls for cracks. If all is good, then I would inflate to see what happens! If they do take air I would get new tubes before taking the bike out of walking distance, because I do not trust old tubes.


9

There are ways tires get damaged other than by having weight on them. For example, ozone and ultraviolet light can cause dry rot. If the tires were stored in a cool area, out of sunlight, and not near any electrical equipment, they're likely fine. If, however, they display cracks, or are brittle, or were stored in sunlight or near electrical equipment, I'...


9

I'd call that part garbage, sorry. You've overtightened it enough to tear apart the metal, and that toothed flange is probably custom. I would suggest replacing the whole unit with a different brand. The one pictured APPEARS to be a threadless stem, but with the steerer clamp down below and the hinge/knuckle up on top somehow. This is quite unusual. ...


8

If you just want a reliable, more comfortable, more efficient and safer bike - just buy a new one. Upgrading older bikes (or even new bikes) requires and investment in time and money: learning about all the different standards in use and parts compatibility, buying special tools, scouring Ebay for parts etc. However, if that is your idea of fun then by all ...


8

If you are planning to ride the bike, replace the handlebar stem


8

Your best bet would be to contact the manufacturer for specifications or even replacement parts. Failing that, your next best thing should be to measure/learn parameters of your current shock, and then finding another ones that matches closely these parameters. What you need to measure/find out are: Eye-to-eye length Stroke length Mounting hardware used to ...


8

According to the 2017 Catalog on the Orbea website, the M40 comes with Shimano Tiagra 4700 components, which are serviceable if not fancy. For an entry bike they'll do fine, and Tiagra 4700 is still the current model per the Shimano website. Even once Shimano updates the Tiagra line, there will still be lots of older components available and Shimano will ...


7

I don't think any manufacturer will give you any warranty in case of "abuse" of its products – and it surely could be considered abusive to have a crash with their clothing, even if it was sold as mountainbike clothing. There may be some exception with protective gear, but even then the manufacturer might argue that it was designed to get damaged or ...


7

When I fixed up my old bike it had a typical BB with fixed and adjustable cups. I planned on replacing with a cartridge BB so I didn't want to get the special tools just for a removal operation. Though I did get the special toothed socket needed to install the new BB (a cheap version online since I'll only use it a few times). Using a slot screwdriver, or ...


7

It mostly depends on the width of your rims. If, for example, your rims are 50 mm wide (internal bead distance), then 2.1" tires (nominally 53 mm wide) would sit very awkwardly on them. Instability at cornering and overall tire stability are likely to be problems. There are answers on this website about best tire width/rim width combinations, look them up if ...


7

Maintaining this bike shouldn't be a problem. Although there are all too many standards for bicycles and bike parts, almost all parts are made to some standard, and that bike appears to be using up-to-date standards without any especially weird parts. The parts are not made by Orbea anyhow, they're made by other companies, and in any case you'll be able to ...


7

Looks like what is known as an 'adjustable cup and cone' bottom bracket. That means the bracket can be disassembled, and the axle and ball bearings will come out; also the clearance between the cups and cones (the surfaces the ball bearings run on) can be adjusted. This differs from a 'cartridge' unit that is pressed together and cannot be disassembled or ...


7

If it's 25 years old, it's a tubed tire. 26x2.125 is a very standard MTB tire from that era. If you get any MTB 26" tire in the 2.2 to 1.5 in range that should work just fine on your bike. For any tire made in the last 20 years there should be an ETRTO number on it as well, this is a number like 50-559. Its' designed tire width and rim diameter. So 26 x 2....


6

I had the same problem (48x38x28 chainset). It turned out that MF-TZ21 is actually not a 'cassette', but a 'freewheel'. Your options for that are very limited: In the UK, Raleigh is distributing a 7 speed 13-24T model for less than 10 quid. SunRace is still producing 7 speed freewheels, but the closed-spaced 12-?? model wasn't distributed in the UK: Check ...


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