New answers tagged

-3

"The definition of insanity is doing (nearly) the same thing over and over and expecting different results." You have observed cheap Shimano Sora chainrings to wear away rapidly. The solution is to not replace the crank assembly with Tiagra with Tiagra chainrings, because Tiagra chainrings have the same flaw: they're not made of 7075T6 aluminum. ...


3

Yes, you can slam the new 4700 chainset straight in there. It should be as simple as that if the ring sizes are the same, though you may need to subtly adjust the front derailleur. Your other option is to buy a pair of 110bcd 5-arm chainrings from TA, Middleburn, Shimano, etc etc, which is usually nearly as expensive.


4

"whether it's a reasonable goal to try to make your gravel bike 'more road bike-like' with different tires" It is. "and how to achieve it." By mounting a road tyre. That is all there is to it. We can then get into long arguments between the proponents of Continental vs. Schwalbe, vs Challenge vs. Vittoria vs. Tufo vs. whatever... It is ...


3

If you are mainly riding on tarmac roads, then it is perfectly reasonable to mount slick tires. In my experience, slick tires are fine even on dirt roads, e.g. up to grade 2 in the Cyclingtips classification of gravel surfaces (it's an ordinal scale ranging from bad roads at grade 1 to very large rock chunks at grade 4; the latter is described as nearly MTB ...


3

If you want a road tire that actually will result in more speed at the same effort, I found the Continental GP 5000 did that. I do not have a power meter, but rode the same route in a similar manner as in same gears, cadence, and heart rate. I was about 3% faster when it came to average speed for the ride coming from Bontrager R3s. Qualitatively the tires ...


1

If your frame lacks disk brake mounts now, then give up this idea, and look for a second/replacement bike or frame. There were dangerous "accessories" that provided brake mounts on frames bereft of them, but the frames weren't engineered for those loads and could fail. Likewise, adding mounts was no guarantee of success either. Example - this is a ...


1

If you're already planning on replacing your front fork, you should consider switching to disc brakes on at least the front. Disc brake mounts are now standard on suspension forks and it can be difficult to even find a fork with V brake mounts. Be sure to keep an axle-to-crown distance and fork travel similar to that of your current fork, or you'll end up ...


-1

I would like to know whether I can replace my old v-brakes with disc brakes. Do I need to also change the wheels or something else? Yes, you need to change the wheels -- or at least the hubs (and possibly spokes too). You also need to change the fork. Not to mention the frame. Also the brake levers are useless unless you buy mechanical v brakes with long ...


-4

I have a 2020 Giant Revolt 3 (https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/revolt-advanced-3) gravel bike that I ride 99% on tarmac. I was considering a road bike, but as I was coming from a mountain bike background and had never ridden a road bike, this seemed a good compromise. You made a good choice. Gravel bikes are far more optimal on the road than road bikes for ...


2

We're not into product recommendations; you should peruse cycling websites that list and review such things and see what is available to buy (locally or local shipping) But in general, you'd want a tire with a slick/low profile rolling center band with more knobby sides. Or go with a tire with minimal "texture" (I don't know the exact word).


1

You need to have the appropriate mounts on the fork, the rear of the frame, and you need hubs that can accept disc rotors. My understanding is that some older MTB frames and forks had mounts for both V- and disc brakes. This was when the industry was starting to shift towards disc brakes. While I'm not familiar with MTBs, that might have been in the early ...


0

tl;dr: knowing the parts is useless. You have a caliper, now you just need to remove everything and measure everything. You will learn something just by disassembling this bicycle and not focusing on brands, just on dimensions and "mechanics" of the parts you are removing. Then, about reassembling it, it will cost you 5 times the money and 50 times ...


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