11

Gasoline aka petrol, is a volatile fluid that will dissolve grease and oils. It will penetrate, soften, and loosen impacted and congealed dirt and dust. Petrol / Gasoline will NOT fix your rust, nor remove your rust. It will not restore chrome. Petrol is not terrible for rubber parts, but I wouldn't leave them soaking in the fluid. The best use for ...


9

I would put them on before the clear coat. That way the clear coat helps to protect the decals as well as the paint.


9

This is often called "the slippery slope of knock-on upgrades" which can get expensive quickly. There are two simple and relatively cheap upgrades to try. Replace the brake pad inserts with modern compound Kool Stop. They will brake better than the original ones, which may also be a bit hardened with age. There will be a model that fits your brake pad ...


9

If you are planning to ride the bike, replace the handlebar stem


8

The first question you should ask yourself is are you going to do this project is for fun and experience or for money? There is surely money to be made, otherwise the workshops like Steel Vintage Bikes from Berlin would not exist. As I can see you have been donated a (pardon my judgement) rather a generic frame and you won't be looking for substantial ...


8

If you just want a reliable, more comfortable, more efficient and safer bike - just buy a new one. Upgrading older bikes (or even new bikes) requires and investment in time and money: learning about all the different standards in use and parts compatibility, buying special tools, scouring Ebay for parts etc. However, if that is your idea of fun then by all ...


7

This is most likely a mixture of fuelling and trying to do too much too soon. It sounds like you routinely eat a fairly low carb diet, which is not in itself a bad thing, but will mean that it's unlikely your glycogen stores are ever more than partially filled. This is not a problem at all during low intensity exercise, but when exercising at high ...


6

You won't be able to simply bolt on a coaster brake. Coaster brakes are typically built into a single speed or 2 or 3 speed internally geared hub. To fit a coaster brake you will have to replace the rear wheel hub, which obviously means a wheel rebuild, or whole new wheel with a matching rim. Whether a modern coaster brake hub would fit in your frame ...


6

It's been a while since I researched this, so don't take it as gospel, but ... There are several stages in the sequence toward metabolic exhaustion: When you first start to exercise, the muscles (other than the heart muscles) burn "blood sugar" -- glucose. This provides instant energy, so it's always circulating (until the supply is exhausted). Blood ...


6

Near as I can tell from the posted pictures you have Maillard CXC pedals. My guess is that you have the 500 model that can't be repaired. "Baldy" has an account on his blog of working on the model 500 version, sadly he does not say how he will remove the "swaged-in bearings": It turns out the bearings are 'swaged' in at the outer edge ...


5

Gasoline does work for cleaning parts. But it's also extremely toxic and flammable, and may damage rubber or plastic parts (depending on the parts). So don't bother, just use degreaser. (If you want to get the strong stuff, go to an auto parts store. If you want to get massive quantities of the strong stuff, go to a janitorial supply or restaurant supply ...


5

Coach lines (stripes) are a type of thin stripes you saw on (typically British) cars. They were a hallmark on high end cars like Rolls Royces. See this image from from this article: The coach lines are the lines under the guy's hand. See also the wikipedia article on Pinstripes. My guess is that this bike may have had some sort of pin striping.


5

A really good question and one that a pro in the bike painting/PC business would be best suited to answer, but this is what I know about it: Bikes need special care, or at least an operator that understands the important parameters, in the stripping, blasting/prep, and heating stages. For example, I've heard horror stories about taking a frame in to a ...


5

I run on carbs, so my diet is very different to yours. But plenty of people do ride low carb, even keto. It's a conscious lifestyle decision for them though, and others only have carbs at all towards the end of a long ride. It takes time, effort and commitment to adapt to that, and it's not for everyone. Your typical daily diet as described in the question ...


5

As there are balls missing and bent components, you should completely refurbish the hub. It looks like a freewheel type hub rather than a freehub/cassette type. First thing to do is get the freewheel off. Personally I’d replace the freewheel so I’d be starting with unworn sprockets and chain. Disassemble the hub, completely degrease and clean and inspect the ...


4

Return the bolt. You need to turn it out only for a half inch, then easily strike it with a hammer. (Don't make a strong strike, to not drive in the quill stem if it rusted!) Usually it will be enough, Yet it can be a little rusted, so hitting with your hand on the handles will help. Sometimes it's very rusted, so you will need to use some oil to deal with ...


4

There are two possibilities: 1.) The roller brake mechanism and internals are completely seized. Based on the level of rust on the outside of the brake, there is a strong possibility that there is rust inside as well. Shimano roller brakes do need to be in fairly good condition, and have the correct Shimano grease in them to work well. If the brake had a ...


4

Gasoline may work as a degreaser, meaning it may improve the looks of your metal by removing the superficial coat of oil/grease. I would not recommend the use of gasoline, because it will have additives that are intended for motor engines, and you do not know the effect they will have in your parts. Secondly, I would not recommend using it in a chain, ...


4

If the tyre's safe to ride on, removing and replacing it shouldn't damage it, as long as you use the correct tools. These are tyre levers, which can be bought for literally a couple of dollars/euros/pounds. The internet will tell you how to do this; it's not difficult. If the tyre can't be removed without damaging it, then it's not safe to ride.


4

Since it is no load carrying part and if you keep enough clearance between the repaired spot and the tyre there should be no problem. Take care to sand away any rust beforehand and treat the rusted part with rust removing chemicals.


4

The first thing to do to determine what you need is to make a comprehensive list of everything that you have. With that, you'll be able to get a reliable answer on what will be compatible. First thing to do would be to confirm whether your bike has a 126mm rear hub spacing as I would expect on a bike off its age. Next check if your rear derailleur or ...


4

The bike kinda looks like a inexpensive model. Don't spend any real money (i.e. buying wheels) until you ascertain that the bike isn't a basket case, i.e. brakes and shifting can be made to work, headset and bottom bracket bearings are OK etc. If you really don't know much about bike repair you have a lot to learn, fortunately there is a huge wealth of ...


4

One fairly simple way to convert a derailleur bike to a single speed is to fit a replacement cassette with only one cog. Notice this is little more than a stack of spacers, one special cog, and more spacers. Moving the parts around will let you adjust your chainline inboard or outboard. The cog is not just one out of a cassette - it has no ramps or pins,...


4

That's an awesome bike - would be called a MTB back in the day, but now we'd call it a rigid MTB. You probably have to replace the brake pads (the rubber blocks, 4 in total) because they go hard with age/ozone/UV and don't brake as well. That style of brake is called a cantilever and while less-common now, they can still work perfectly well when tweaked ...


4

1 Is there a consensus that renovating a classic bike from a reputable company is fair play, or would I be breaking a tacit bicycle commandment by doing this? 2 Has anyone regretted carrying out such an operation? Question 1: There is no consensus on renovating vs. conserving There are no global tacit bicycle commandments. There are localized tastes and ...


3

It needs to be emphasized that gasoline/petrol is extremely flammable, much more dangerous than most of the other alternative solvents. It should only be used "out of doors", or at least in a garage with the vehicle door open and no nearby source of ignition such as a water heater. Even flicking on a light switch in a gasoline-fumed garage could be ...


3

Two questions here - restore an old bike and what bike for your wife. Lets deal with the easy one - an old Specialised will be a better bike than a department store one. If you need much more gear to be replaced, consider looking for a donor. Add another $100 to you list for things that might need doing - like new cluster and chain rings, brake pads etc. ...


3

Here's the Shimano datasheet. So we know it's a square taper, ISO-threaded BB. So a UN54/UN55 is the replacement part (take the UN55). 73 is the shell size: 73mm. 113 is the spindle length: 113mm.


3

Old French bike parts have different size standards than Italian ones. See http://www.sheldonbrown.com/velos.html for list. Probably the easiest part to measure is the bottom bracket width, which is 70mm for Italian and 68mm for French bikes.


3

There's a few approaches you could take... I'd say that getting it blasted should be the first step no matter what as chemical strippers can damage alloy frames are very messy and really bad for the environment. Give it a polish with some very fine grit wet/dry paper to polish up the alloy. Then you could use one or a combination of the methods below to ...


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