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31 votes
Accepted

Does a bike exist that is both very light and does not need to be ridden in a hunched over position?

Here's what you need! Lightweight and upright --
Daniel R Hicks's user avatar
30 votes
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Is it poor technique or physiology that causes people to cycle with their knees sticking out to the side?

Based on the people I've seen riding, knees-apart is a symptom. New rider - it takes time to develop a good pedal stroke, and some people haven't got there. Saddle too low - If your position is ...
Criggie's user avatar
  • 125k
27 votes

Does a bike exist that is both very light and does not need to be ridden in a hunched over position?

Consider trying a recumbent. They fail on your "light" requirement, with weights well above a diamond-frame. However for a crook back, sitting in a comfy armchair is magical compared to being on a ...
Criggie's user avatar
  • 125k
19 votes
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What body positions (or goals) create more stability over obstacles in mountain biking, and how do I lower my center of gravity?

Why are roadies so hunched over?!? Let me begin by characterizing why road bikes have their riding position vs why MTBs have theirs. It's a gross generalization of course, but most riders and riding ...
MaplePanda's user avatar
  • 15.6k
15 votes

Does it really matter if my stem doesn’t block the hub?

No, it doesn't matter. Riders have different body weight distributions, degrees of upper body strength, body proportions, and sets of priorities for their hunched-over versus upright positioning, even ...
Nathan Knutson's user avatar
10 votes
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Does the superman style have any chance to be seen in competition?

I really doubt it. A number of problems pop into my head immediately. Corners. French/Italian/Spanish road surfaces. Holding your legs up long enough to be worth it. I'm pretty sure this video is ...
alex's user avatar
  • 5,764
10 votes

Ride a Century Without Stopping?

I've almost done this, and its not "easy" but it should be possible. However a non-stop 100 km is much harder than simply doing 100 km. Try working up do it. I don't know what your current distance ...
Criggie's user avatar
  • 125k
10 votes

How to make a derailleur work in opposite directions?

When you switch to the crankset behind cogs, you need to move the derailleur above the cogset. Think of it as rotating the entire drive train 180 degrees forward or flipping the entire bike over the ...
ojs's user avatar
  • 22.1k
10 votes

Is it a good idea to lift the front wheel to go through small bumps?

Potential for damage to wheels depends on sharpness of the bump, speed, bike and rider weight, tire volume and pressure, and how tough the wheels are. Moving your weight back or pulling up on the ...
Argenti Apparatus's user avatar
10 votes

Should one's bum be behind, or merely over, the lowered saddle on steeper descents?

Depends entirely how steep the hill is. The aim is to keep the bike balanced maintaining reasonable (50%) of weight on the rear wheel, and when that can no longer be achieved, keep the center of ...
mattnz's user avatar
  • 50.9k
9 votes
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Would Tri-Bars be advantageous for a 260 mile 2 day event

I would suggest attaching the bars and doing some test rides. Is your bike, with it's aggressive geometry, stable when using them? Are you comfortable using them? Does this new position provide some ...
FreeMan's user avatar
  • 1,571
9 votes
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Potential risks of sitting upright on the saddle during a daily commute

Of course, you will have less control over your bike if you don't hold the handle bars, especially if something unexpected happens (like a truck coming out of nowhere at full speed for example). ...
Borissov's user avatar
  • 366
9 votes

how do you develop the strength to be able to hold a aero right angled forearm position?

It's all about core strength, not arm strength. If you want to ride like this for long periods of time you should be supporting most of your weight with your core muscles - not your arms. Your ...
Kevin's user avatar
  • 534
9 votes
Accepted

I'm 37, can my legs still grow?

Your observations are confounded with time and lots of things can change in the intervening time, this include your flexibility (e.g., hips and/or hamstrings) and your components (e.g., your saddle). ...
Rider_X's user avatar
  • 30.7k
9 votes

Does a bike exist that is both very light and does not need to be ridden in a hunched over position?

Many of the (continental?) European "every-day" bikes have a relatively upright and straight back position (you basically get a continuum there from sportive strongly forward tilted position to ...
cbeleites unhappy with SX's user avatar
9 votes
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Should one's bum be behind, or merely over, the lowered saddle on steeper descents?

As I elaborated upon in considerable detail in this answer, it's mandatory that you treat body position while MTBing as a continuously variable thing, not a binary switch. You position your hips where ...
MaplePanda's user avatar
  • 15.6k
8 votes

Does a bike exist that is both very light and does not need to be ridden in a hunched over position?

Does something already exist? Probably not. Could something be custom-built for you? Definitely. Super-light bikes are generally only in the "hunched over" aggressive positions, because generally ...
whatsisname's user avatar
  • 12.1k
8 votes

Does a bike exist that is both very light and does not need to be ridden in a hunched over position?

How upright are we talking? It’s true that racing oriented road bike frames have geometries for a relatively hunched-over seating position. However, training road bikes or “fitness” bikes (road bikes ...
Michael's user avatar
  • 27.8k
8 votes
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Are Adjustable Stems With Reasonable Merit?

Whether they work: Short answer yes, they do not have major widespread problems. Most problems that do occur are related to undertightening the bolts on them to start with, or adjusting them without ...
Nathan Knutson's user avatar
8 votes

Sliding Back in the Saddle while Climbing

If a climb is steep enough, I would aggressively lean forward and tension my arms. Not quite getting out of the saddle, but just-about. This shifts more weight to the front wheel, which for me gets a ...
Criggie's user avatar
  • 125k
7 votes

Is it poor technique or physiology that causes people to cycle with their knees sticking out to the side?

it might be for therapeutical reasons. once I hit a pole with my knee and it hurt. I asked a physiotherapist how to ride until it gets better (I had to because I was working as a messenger) and I was ...
törzsmókus's user avatar
7 votes

Ride a Century Without Stopping?

it would seem to me that nutrition, hydration, waste disposal and arm fatigue would be the greatest challenges Nutrition: isn't that hard, although if you haven't already, you might want to spend ...
Useless's user avatar
  • 3,017
7 votes

how do you develop the strength to be able to hold a aero right angled forearm position?

Kevin's answer about core being used to hold the position is correct, but I wanted to add some clarifications about factors that can affect how you engage your core muscle when in an aggressive ...
Rider_X's user avatar
  • 30.7k
7 votes
Accepted

Is it a good idea to lift the front wheel to go through small bumps?

Hitting any obstacle with the front wheel has always a worse events development potential compared to hitting the same obstacle with the rear wheel: one can loose control over the bicycle and fall ...
Grigory Rechistov's user avatar
7 votes

Why do people think the upright position is comfortable?

In general terms, a more forward position will mean that more body weight is supported by the arms, and that the back/spine is rotated forwards to a greater angle. The neck will also need to support ...
Swifty's user avatar
  • 12.8k
7 votes

Why do people think the upright position is comfortable?

Old question but came up in my search in 2023, so here's the issue, at least for me...It's not a matter of back upright necessarily, but when you have to lean forward too far, then your spine AND NECK ...
what do I know's user avatar
7 votes

Does a bike exist that is both very light and does not need to be ridden in a hunched over position?

I will add another suggestion to the conversation, by throwing in the Pedersen. It is a very unique and stylished bike, which would definitely fit your requirements : It has a hammock saddle, which ...
Standaa - Remember Monica's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

What is the best technique to use when turning my bicycle?

Which foot should be down, if any? The foot on the outside of the curve should be down and the foot on the inside curve should be up (exception: on uneven ground cranks should be horizontal so ...
juhist's user avatar
  • 19.1k
7 votes
Accepted

Gravel handlebar geometry: any use of the hooks' flare?

Let's settle some terminology first. I think that in practice, a lot of people say "the drops" to mean the entire curved section of the handlebar below the brake levers. I think that the OP ...
Weiwen Ng's user avatar
  • 32.6k
7 votes

On WSD bicycle shouldn't the seat tube be longer and at a shallower angle?

A few thoughts: moving the saddle back to compensate for a too short seat post is not the right approach. Seat tubes have a minimum insertion length mark, it's important to respect it, but as long as ...
Rеnаud's user avatar
  • 20.6k

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