27

V-brakes can be hateful and make a lot of sound if they're improperly adjusted- sometimes they're noisy even when they're properly adjusted, especially on braking surfaces that are not machined. You can usually alleviate this with one or more of the following methods. First and foremost, make sure your pads are properly adjusted. This is better demonstrated ...


25

Sorry, those rims are trash (or wall art). I'd chase down the seller and demand your money back, and report them on whatever sites they were advertising on for selling items in a known dangerous state. The crank may be small now but it will propagate in both directions and get bigger. Cracks on thin section aluminum cannot be welded as the heat will destroy ...


21

Ideally, the brakes should be able strong enough to break traction otherwise you will not be able to brake maximally (i.e., just before the threshold of losing traction). Rim brakes can do this, even in wet weather, if set up correctly. The real advantage of disc brakes in wet weather is other aspects of how the brakes perform. From personal experience, ...


19

It's a wear indicator. The friction of the brakes gradually abrades the rim away and the track lets you see how fast that's happening. Once the rim has worn enough that the track is very shallow, the wheel is starting to lose strength and should be replaced. For wheels that don't have a wear indicator groove, you can detect wear by holding a straight edge ...


17

You have already answered your own question really. When I slam the brakes on the wheels lock up(front and back) but i take longer to stop than i'm perhaps used to. If the brakes are strong enough to lock up the wheels they have plenty of power, but you have overcome the ability of the tyre to grip the road.


16

They're called Travel Agents and are used to change the cable pull of a brake lever so you can mix and match brake styles.


14

This is normal to some extent - brake pads have to be made of soft material which wears down on the rims (and conversely, the rims wear down into the brake pads to some extent) in order to stop you. This means the pads pick up grime and bits of metal from the rims and road and stuff which embed into the pads and in turn wear down your rims / reduce braking ...


11

I have been using disc brakes on my Mountain, Cyclocross, and Road bikes for well over 10 years now. Earlier disc brake versions certainly took a while to reach excellent, smooth, and modulated braking power levels that they currently enjoy. In that context, a poorly adjusted or designed disc brake vs. a well adjusted v-brake showed less performance ...


11

Glad to see you're back! You can use a Problem Solvers Cable Doubler 1:2 to pull 2 brakes with 1 lever. Its a little device which you hook up the two brakes to (assuming they have the same cable pull) with 2 sets of brake cables, then run something to the levers. This works for essentially any pair of cable operated brakes with the same cable pull. For ...


11

With the brake tension released (either through the quick release or untensioning the brake wire) is the spring tension on both sides equal? As @Daniel R Hicks notes, some unevenness is inevitable with direct pull and cantilever brakes due to their design. For V brakes and other direct pull (as well as cantilever) there's a little screw on each arm that ...


11

Rim brakes need an appropriate braking surface on the rim -- if you apply rim brakes to a rim which doesn't have an appropriate braking surface, it'll wear down the rims quickly to be unsafe to ride on (or possibly damage the rims in other ways). Disc brakes need a hub that can mount a disc rotor. As you can note from the two points above, they're ...


11

The hub for a disc brake wheel has the mounting for the brake rotor machined into the left side, and has shorter spokes that side to make room for the brake. If the eBay wheels are for rim brakes, they won’t have these disc mount features out the box. If the spoke counts match and are sufficient, you could theoretically rebuild the rims onto disc specific ...


11

The maximum braking force is achieved when the tire is just about to loose traction and start sliding on the road surface. Braking force decreases sharply as the tire begins to slide. If you are locking both wheels, you are not getting maximum braking force, so try to modulate the force you are putting on the levers so that the wheels do not lock up. You ...


11

I assume by 'pin' you mean the following part: This part is called the 'insert' or 'connecting insert' and its purpose is to 'support' the (non rigid) brake hose in order to prevent it from crushing/reducing drastically in diameter when the sleeve nut is tightened causing the olive to be compressed onto the brake hose. In other words: When tightening the ...


10

There's no problem mounting a disc-compatible hub to rim-brake compatible rim. Just make sure they've got the same number of spokes and you're good to go. You're absolutely right about the opposite though, disc brake rims generally do not have a braking surface on them, the rim profile is round there, so it wouldn't work. And if you did try to brake on it, ...


9

Some disc-brake specific wheels use rims that are not designed for rim brakes. To accomplish what you want you need a wheel with a a disc-brake hub and a rim-brake rim. With that setup, assuming the fork widths are the same, you should be able to switch wheels between bikes without problems. The only drawback is the slight increase in rotating mass from ...


9

There are a couple of factors that might come into play. The first is that you may be braking more than you think at the back. Which brake is controlled by your stronger hand? Are they adjusted the same? The second factor is dirt. The front wheel throws up dust and muddy water, some of which can reach the back wheel even with mudguards. This can abrade ...


9

It's because you have a combination of brake levers designed for V-brakes and side pull brakes. V-brakes need more cable pull for the same effect, so your levers pull the cable too fast. The solution is to get levers designed for caliper brakes, something like for example this (note "Caliper or Canti Brake Lever System"): http://www.tektro.com/_english/...


9

There are a few possibilities but its fairly easy to isolate the likely problem. Unclip the noodle (where the cable comes out) and check if the problem is in the V brakes or the cable. If its the V brakes, it could be a broken spring, or the brakes need oiling. If the brakes are free to move and spring back firmly, its likely a problem with the cable or ...


8

The power output from braking is linearly dependent on speed and braking force. To reduce heat buildup, you have to reduce either one of these. The options are: Descend very slowly. This is boring, but works. Descend so fast that air resistance takes most of the force (the force depends roughly on second power of speed). This is the idea behind the advice ...


8

Daniel's comment is right, in addition check the brake lever for stiffness. You should be able to undo the noodle from the noodle-holder, the brake arms should extend out to the sides, and each should have about the same hand-pressure required to close up. There should be a "tension" adjust screw in the base of each arm, although I have bikes with just one ...


8

This is a good question. The short answer is that the design of modern rim brake pads is greedy and cynical. This is a Mathauser pad, and is representative of how a lot of old brake pads were, and some still are. The design differences with modern pads are obvious. You get a huge simple block of rubber with no grooves. Nothing about the design of the pad ...


8

It’s not practical to do this. The frame needs to be built to take disc brakes, and this frame isn’t. In theory, you could find a custom framebuilder who could add the mounting points and reinforcements you’d need, but that would be very expensive. After that, you’d need new wheels and components.


8

Discs have a much higher clamping force. For rim brakes, there's usually quite a bit of movement; you can run the brakes with 5mm clearance from the rim and it'll still work fine. With discs, the pads move a much smaller distance, allowing them to use higher leverage ratios. For example, people running hydraulic rim brakes found themselves crushing rims from ...


7

I'll share my personal formula, which I use myself and in a couple bikes I often perform maintenance to, and that are ridden by other people. These tips are for V-brake or "linear pull" type, but the same can be applied to other types too, at least caliper and cantilever, as long as they are cable actuated (i.e. no hydraulic). First of all, I check brake ...


7

From what I've read, you should have a slight angle (called "toe-in") between the rims and the pads to prevent them from squeaking. Angle them so that the front of the pad angles towards the rim. When applying full force, the entire brake pad should come in contact with the rim. See this question for more information about relieving squeaking from your ...


7

I'm not aware of any established best practices other than "as close as possible, without any rubbing through a full revolution of the wheel".


7

The one thing to be aware of is that disk brakes put more force on the spokes during breaking than rim brakes. Mostly this is not an issue as long as you do not use radial spoking. If you build up the wheel with 3x and anything but super silly light spokes, it should be no problem at all.


7

One thing to look out for is the size of the drop from the bolt securing the brake to the frame, and the brake blocks, to ensure the new brakes will fit in such a way that the blocks line up with the rims. Probably if you have a newish bike, then any new brakes you buy will be of the same dimension as new brakes. But it's worth making sure they'll fit - ...


7

Yes, they all work together. Only exception is all mini V-brakes. They are not compatible with standard V-brakes.


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