New answers tagged

1

My background: While not riding anymore, during college I did everything with my bike. I spoked several wheels (more expensive ones) on my own and never had a spoke snap except on cheap wheels that I hadn't spoked myself. Never had your weight but I was abusing my bikes (downhill, potholes with 20+ kg of luggage). So I would almost bet the stress I put on ...


0

I rode bicycles for years hitting a lot of times hard potholes edges, tram tracks protruding from poorly resurfaced roads and so on. I often ended up with at least one the rims full of dents, but that never caused the spokes to snap. It happened only after I was lightly hit by a car from behind and I started riding with the rear wheel slightly bent. I think ...


4

I see that Malvern don't highlight rider height and weight on their website info (https://www.bicyclesuperstore.com.au/malvern-star-sprint-1-2019.html) for this bike, but they do highlight that it's a lightweight alloy framed bike. I'd suspect that at 100kg you may be at or above the intended weight for the bike (I know my road bike has a 95kg rider weight ...


0

It could be your riding style, but I would suspect that it's mostly the wheels. The first two things that come to mind here are single vs double walled rims, and tire inflation. Addressing the latter first, if you ride hard on tires that are under-inflated, especially as rider weight increases, you will have less cushioning between your rims and the road. ...


9

First congratulations and encouragement for getting out there on the bike. Don't get discouraged, the problem is fixable. I totally agree with other answers saying get the wheel rebuilt with new spokes. I'd go with heaver gauge spokes as well. Although this will cost some money it's likely the most cost-effective option in the long run. I'd make some ...


19

I suggest you get the wheel rebuilt properly, once and for all (probably by a different bike shop). A well-built wheel should be able to handle even riding off kerbs or small unavoidable potholes without breaking spokes. You should unweight the saddle and take the weight on your feet, but even if you don't it should survive an occasional hit. A hybrid like ...


2

100 kg is quite a lot and some wheels can stand more and some less and it is not a manufacturing defect to stand less, it is just a feature. So it may be the wheel, but not something you can claim warranty for, that is usually reserved for manufacturing defects. It is really hard to say more from a simple description. Two occurrences can still be a ...


27

Not enough points to comment, so here is an answer instead, based mostly on my own experience. I've been using a bike as my main, if not sole, mean of transportation for the last 20 years or so. During that time, my weight changed a lot (from 80 to 130kgs (176 - 286 lbs)). When I was 80, I nearly never broke a spoke (maybe once per 10 000km), and only after ...


3

Rolling resistance of MTB tyres is not necessarily related to either width or tread pattern. The quality of the casing and rubber compound have far more influence. A high quality 3.0" tyre will be faster, grippier and more pleasant to ride than a cheap 2.1" tyre. Changing to a much smaller tyre will also change some characteristics of the bike for the ...


7

It mostly depends on the width of your rims. If, for example, your rims are 50 mm wide (internal bead distance), then 2.1" tires (nominally 53 mm wide) would sit very awkwardly on them. Instability at cornering and overall tire stability are likely to be problems. There are answers on this website about best tire width/rim width combinations, look them up if ...


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