26

16 km/h is so slow that even the worst tyres should keep you up, unless something like oil spills were involved. If something is so slippy that you fall without warning at such low speeds there is not much one could do. If you have a hunch this might happen tripodding corners or getting off the bike may help. The first drizzle after a long dry spell can ...


16

In places where it rains very little or hasn't rained in a while and then a light rain falls, the water is not enough to "wash" the road surface; instead it only wets fine dust and oils that are on the surface. These oils come from cars' engines and exhausts, but are not noticeable at first sight. This mix turns into a fine, paste-like substance that is very ...


14

To fall to the inside of the turn means that the bottom of the wheel has slid to the outside. When that happens, it is really quick. I would look back at the corner and see if there's a metal plate in the roadway, which are terribly greasy when wet. Other possibilities include round grit/gravel/dust/sant that acts as a ball bearing, and oils on the ...


10

In addition to the previous answers, your tire pressure was likely too high for the conditions. If you know you're going to be riding in the rain, it's usually a good idea to lower your tire pressure from what you would normally have them at in dry conditions. A lower tire pressure allows the tire contact patch to deform more, thereby increasing the amount ...


8

I posed this question directly to the people at Molten Speed Wax and got this reply: Our product works great in winter, the key is to put the chain on the bike inside and run it through the gears when the chain is still warm from the pot. The reason is a newly waxed chain is very stiff in super cold temps., but if you pre-break in the chain before going ...


7

I'm surprised to see that no one else mentioned it, and this isn't a terribly detailed answer, but that road has what motorcyclists refer to as the dreaded "tar snakes". The tar they use to patch cracks ends up very smooth, and depending on weather conditions can get polished even more by traffic. Especially in wet conditions, that thin line of tar can be ...


6

First off, it's untrue that smooth tires are best in the rain. In spite of what Sheldon said, a tire with some tread will provide a better grip on a wet surface. But regardless of that, you can slightly reduce your chance of skidding on a curve by leaning OUT on the turn. Basically, keep your bike as upright as you reasonably can. This isn't as sexy as ...


5

Perhaps it could be due to the type of asphalt, I know there is Open-graded friction course (OGFC) (very porous asphalt with a lot of air gaps in it) which is much better at draining the water that falls on its surface, perhaps the asphalt you were riding on was not of this porous type causing more water to accumulate on the surface. However I am quite sure ...


4

I would re-tighten the bleed port screw and watch for leaks. If you get no leakage and the screw does not loosen then you are fine. A partially damaged thread should not be a problem as the bleed port screw does not have any load on it. (There should not even be any fluid pressure on it during braking as the reservoir is cut off from the line by the piston ...


4

Are you physically near the seller? The single best thing you can do is go see it, inspect it closely, and then get a leg over the bike. Test Ride That way you'll know instantly if its a "no-way" fit bit sitting over the bike. A good seller will let you take it for a ride too. Ideally an hour, with some mixed surfaces, and a small climb/descent to get ...


4

If this is your first go at waxing you might want to hold-off until summer so that you can get the hang of waxing before having to deal with the extra workload caused by poorer riding conditions. I use waxed chains in wet BC weather, not as sever as Alberta, but winter maintenance is still a challenge compared to summer. Like all lubes, waxing does not ...


2

Based on the photo from your link, this bike will be difficult to convert because of the dropout having no adjustment at all. Effectively this means you will need some other way of tensioning the chain. Eccentric bottom bracket (expensive) Chain tensioner (looks like a derailleur) This also means you cannot use fixed gear, because the chain will go slack ...


2

Criggie has made some great points. In an attempt to be additive - tagging on to the "Tyre" portion of his comments. Your first consideration when selecting a bicycle is on how you will use it. Once you match your usage to a type of bike then it's time to get the best value for your money. One should take into account the type of roads you will be riding ...


1

In addition to Criggie's answer... Also consider removing the two chainrings you are not using (you may need shorter chainring bolts as one set go through the middle and outer rings.) The usual configuration would be retaining the middle ring and removing the inner small and outer large rings, however as you will be using a single speed conversion kit you ...


1

This is what it was purported to be. The crown race seat area where you're measuring should be more like 33.03-33.09mm (or around 1.302") but I suspect you're not pulling the caliper quite tight enough when you take the measurement. Originally, though they've never been a common size, there was such a thing as a 1-1/4" non-tapered steerer tube. If you had ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible