52

In road racing there are lots of way to try and gain an advantage (or not to give others an advantage). Because this is a friendly race, I will break it down into friendly, indifferent and hostile tactics. Update 1: The OP updated their question to make it clear that they were a beginner and the other rider was a more experienced road rider. So I ...


50

Reference - Cyclecraft by John Franklin A cycle takes more than twice as far to stop using only the rear brake compared to using only the front brake, which will usually stop the machine just as quickly as using both brakes. Nevertheless, you should always apply the rear brake, and slightly in advance of the front brake, so that a slight skid at the rear ...


45

The short answer is: not that difficult. The long answer requires some explanation. The equations of motion for a rider on a bicycle are well-understood if not always well-known. The power needed to propel a bicycle on firm flat ground (as on a velodrome) varies approximately with the cube of speed. Thus, to double your speed, you would need to increase ...


41

Having made the change myself, I can confirm that shock absorbers are actually detrimental to city riding. You lose a lot of power, especially when trying to stand on the pedals for acceleration. Road bikes are also typically much lighter, which in my experience not only helps you go uphill faster, but also makes it a lot easier to carry the bike when ...


40

Road Road bikes are designed for performance on (mostly) well paved roads. They are the lightest weight of the 3 categories, have the shortest wheelbase, lowest bottom bracket, and the steepest headtube angles. These geometry features allow the bike to react to rider inputs quickly and to have a low center of gravity which is beneficial when turning. ...


39

The fork is fitted the wrong way around. The brake caliper should be in front of the fork, not behind it. The way it is, the bike will be very, very hard to ride because of the negative rake, making it very nervous. The negative rake is also the reason for the pedal overlap. Normally, you should at most get some toe overlap. Loosen the bolt in the top of ...


36

Years ago when cars started to get ABS, the argument was that a skilled driver could stop quicker with it turned off, and there was proof of it. When Traction control came in a skilled driver could go faster with it turned off. When ESP became available, ditto. We all know that an unskilled driver benefits enormously from these aids, and it turns out not ...


34

It can be considered "impolite" by roadies, but not because of the bike you were riding or the fact you didn't take a pull (although I am sure some will argue for this). The main reason random drop-in riders are generally frowned upon are because of: the dangers associated with unpredictability of a new rider lack of insurance coverage Potential ...


33

How long a tire lasts depends on a number of factors, including what type of tires you ride, how much you weigh, the conditions you ride in, front vs rear tire, etc. In general, a good set of tires will last a couple thousand miles. When the tire is totally worn out, you can usually see threads beneath the rubber in places. Alternatively, the tire may ...


32

A mountain bike will never really be a road bike. The geometry and construction of the frame is different. Mountain bike frames are designed for a different posture and are often designed for a suspension fork, as well as generally being beefier. You can set up a mountain bike with slick tires and drop bars if you want. I've tried this before and the ride ...


32

Note the technical term for what you are calling "hairs" is "vent spews."[1] As the name indicates, they are a consequence of an important detail of the tire fabrication process. While liquid rubber is being injected or otherwise forced into the tire mold, air bubbles can form in the rubber or between the rubber and the mold. These bubbles can cause the ...


31

Please accept my apologies on behalf of cyclists. Hollerin' something at a motorist who was trying to figure out how to handle an obviously unclear situation was inappropriate. Thanks for doing your best and not killing any cyclists that day! In general, I agree with the other answers here that you handled this fine and there isn't some magic you could have ...


31

While some will say "it's just supply and demand" and companies charge "whatever the market will bear", I'm not convinced that your comparison is fair to try and determine whether bikes are overpriced relative to motorcycles. Using a $4,000+ road bike and comparing it to a $3,000 motorcycle is comparing the upper end of one product to the lower end of ...


31

TL:DR Get the CX Bike, you'll love it! You get three bikes in one, without trading in any noticeable performance on the road. This answer is subjective and based on personal experience, you have been warned: I have a CX bike that is used as a do-it-all bike, and I love it. For almost all aspects that concern any non-professional cyclist a CX is as good, or ...


31

You have commented I mainly use the back brake. I therefore propose option 4: improve your braking technique before spending any money. If you only use half of your bicycle's brakes, you can't expect to stop quickly. Further, you're using much less than half your available braking force, because the back brake is much less effective than the front one. ...


31

A group riding together and cooperating will ride to a set speed, so you'll be surging if you exceed that speed for long. A simple wheel-magnet speedo and bike computer helps show this on your bars without being big or expensive. An ad-hoc group will ride with varying speeds depending on who's in the front and whether they are trying to make a break away ...


30

To be honest, I think you handled the situation pretty well as it was. You've got to get yourself to the bottom of the mountain safely and even in locales which have laws about deliberately impeding following road users you will have to allow people to pass in a manner safe for you, this isn't necessarily going to be immediately. Seems to me that this ...


30

Disclaimer: I am a fixie hater. I'll try to answer this as if I was impartial. Proper road bikes (Including the Moulton) are the machines for speed, and always have been (unless you're on a velodrome). Looking at it through a speed lens, a fixie has a slight weight, aero, and drivetrain efficiency advantage over a road bike, but this usually doesn't come ...


30

I don't have the time to give a full answer at the moment, but I'll upvote a full answer and delete mine. The short incomplete answer is that you're better off pacing yourself relatively evenly. The reasons are both physics and physiological. The physics answer is that drag increases nonlinearly with speed so at higher speeds you're using more of your energy ...


29

Rob, you are correct that a heavier bike will give you a greater fitness benefit over the same distance. The only real counter-point I have is that the most effective bikes for fitness are the ones that get ridden. So, if some reason a lighter bike would more fun or appealing to you (while still be a "good enough" commuter), than a lighter bike could be a ...


29

You will find the journey a lot less effort, as you are dramatically reducing the weight of the bike. You will also be able to accelerate much faster, as the rolling resistance will be reduced through the use of thinner tyres. Your gearing is likely to allow for faster speeds as well. If you previously had suspension, you will notice the ability to ...


28

"Middle of the bar", "On the tops", "Middle", "Top", "Tops", "Center" Hands on the part of the bar closest to the stem. The middle has some width and you can slide your hands around there. "On the corners", "Corners" Hands at the outside end of the section where the bar turns. You can grip the corner different ways. There's a sort of position in between ...


28

If an aluminium frame has to be bent back into alignment, it's trashed. Aluminium cannot be deformed without causing weakness in the material. If the bicycle repair shop literally hit the seat stays with a hammer near the dropouts to straighten the frame is probably weakened in those areas and is very likely unsafe. I personally would not ride that frame. ...


28

The OP linked 4 videos, the first 2 videos were long-course Ironman races, where time trial (TT) bikes were used, while the latter 2 videos were of short-course draft legal races where road bikes were used. In the latter two videos the competitors were either pros or elite amateurs. These individuals typically have multiple bikes and would be using a TT ...


27

This is not an either-or proposition. Your bike is hitting the bumps and supporting your full weight (minus the very small proportion of weight that might be falling at that exact moment) regardless of how you stand when you hit the bumps. The difference is whether you're going to let the additional damping effects of the down tube, seat tube, bottom ...


26

16 km/h is so slow that even the worst tyres should keep you up, unless something like oil spills were involved. If something is so slippy that you fall without warning at such low speeds there is not much one could do. If you have a hunch this might happen tripodding corners or getting off the bike may help. The first drizzle after a long dry spell can ...


25

The real answer is that for a 9km ride, virtually any bike will do the trick. It's hard to be uncomfortable on a bike (that fits you) for that short of a ride. However, I'm fully in the road bike camp on this question. Hybrids are, in my opinion, a compromise with no real benefits. Most people aren't going to ride them off-road (and most road bikes can deal ...


25

The last major technological improvement in standard bicycles was indexed shifting. The indexing part of this isn't that big a deal, but the feature also gives you the ability to shift under load (which is a big deal). I'm thinking this change occurred in the late 80s, but my memory for chronology is poor. Yes, since then we've gotten V-brakes, carbon ...


25

You're talking about a "bunny hop" and it can be done at speed on a loaded bike but it's high risk. You'd almost certainly be better off jumping off the bike and rolling. US Bike Trials call it a "side hop", but in anglonesia I've mostly heard it called a bunny hop. Here's a photo of the 2006 Cycle Messenger World Champion doing more or less that at about ...


25

Since you say you're looking to become a triathlete soon it's far too early to be thinking of advanced training aids like power meters. The first few things to do (not necessarily in this order) are join a tri club enter a triathlon or two join a tri training squad observe your (comparative) strengths and weaknesses get a well recommended triathlon book. ...


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