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40

Having made the change myself, I can confirm that shock absorbers are actually detrimental to city riding. You lose a lot of power, especially when trying to stand on the pedals for acceleration. Road bikes are also typically much lighter, which in my experience not only helps you go uphill faster, but also makes it a lot easier to carry the bike when ...


28

If an aluminium frame has to be bent back into alignment, it's trashed. Aluminium cannot be deformed without causing weakness in the material. If the bicycle repair shop literally hit the seat stays with a hammer near the dropouts to straighten the frame is probably weakened in those areas and is very likely unsafe. I personally would not ride that frame. ...


28

The OP linked 4 videos, the first 2 videos were long-course Ironman races, where time trial (TT) bikes were used, while the latter 2 videos were of short-course draft legal races where road bikes were used. In the latter two videos the competitors were either pros or elite amateurs. These individuals typically have multiple bikes and would be using a TT ...


26

16 km/h is so slow that even the worst tyres should keep you up, unless something like oil spills were involved. If something is so slippy that you fall without warning at such low speeds there is not much one could do. If you have a hunch this might happen tripodding corners or getting off the bike may help. The first drizzle after a long dry spell can ...


16

Some representative values from http://bikecalculator.com/veloUS.html. It's a road-bike calculator, so it's not quite accurate. I simulated a hybrid/city bike by having the rider on a 30-lb road bike with MTB tires, and riding that "road bike" in the least aerodynamic position possible. Note that the difference between a road bike and an actual hybrid or ...


16

In places where it rains very little or hasn't rained in a while and then a light rain falls, the water is not enough to "wash" the road surface; instead it only wets fine dust and oils that are on the surface. These oils come from cars' engines and exhausts, but are not noticeable at first sight. This mix turns into a fine, paste-like substance that is very ...


15

The bottom bracket is not damaged, the left hand crank arm is. You have a 'two piece' crank where the right side crank is permanently attached to a steel axle, and the left hand crank clamps onto the axle with two pinch bolts. The axle has small splines cut into it where the crank clamps on and the crank has corresponding splines cut into it. for the crank ...


14

Let's assume you are talking about speed on a non-inclined surface for a given level of effort. (When we talk about how 'fast' a bicycle is we can also mean how well it accelerates from a standstill or low speed, or how well it handles around turns or on a bumpy surface.) Constant speed is achieved when power applied to the pedals is equal to the power lost ...


14

To fall to the inside of the turn means that the bottom of the wheel has slid to the outside. When that happens, it is really quick. I would look back at the corner and see if there's a metal plate in the roadway, which are terribly greasy when wet. Other possibilities include round grit/gravel/dust/sant that acts as a ball bearing, and oils on the ...


13

Aluminum alloy is weakened by being bent. The seat-stay is bowed in so that loads will tend to bend the stay more. The stay probably will not fail suddenly, but it will develop a crack where it's bent if you keep riding it. It's probably OK to ride on temporarily, even if the stay does fail the other stay will support the wheel. You say the bike is a Cube ...


13

Safe - probably yes. Good idea - no. As Argenti Apparatus stated, the bike should not fail without some warning, but it probably will fail sooner or later. As people noted in the comments - the geometry seems to have been changed - the wheel seems to be pointing slightly to right, the drop-out seems out of plane etc. The hub axle might be bent, also the ...


10

There are a bunch of bikes sold in the UK that are specifically designed for the cycle-to-work scheme: they have good specs for commuting, are priced to come in under the £1000 limit, etc. A number of online vendors stock these. So that would be a good place to start. Or find someone selling one of those bikes used. The additional weight of a steel bike is ...


10

In addition to the previous answers, your tire pressure was likely too high for the conditions. If you know you're going to be riding in the rain, it's usually a good idea to lower your tire pressure from what you would normally have them at in dry conditions. A lower tire pressure allows the tire contact patch to deform more, thereby increasing the amount ...


9

Warranty - buying one bike from one supplier means the whole thing is under warranty. New bike frames may have anything from one year to lifetime warranty, but often have a rider about "must be assembled by an authorised and qualified bike shop" Integration - all the parts will physically fit into the frame quite well. Stuff like internally routed cabling ...


9

If you can put a patch on without overlapping the existing one, it's fine. If the patches would overlap, I can't see any problem but I could have missed something. Were the two punctures in rapid succession? If so, that and the similar location suggests that there's still debris in your tyre: check the area carefully for glass or similar pokng through the ...


9

Given your budget you'll be looking at aluminum or steel framed bikes, but that's fine. There are many choices of steel or aluminum drop-bar bikes available. The first thing I would think about is how much gear do you need to carry when commuting? Can you carry everything you need in a backpack or will you need panniers or other on-bike luggage? mass is ...


8

For the long term, that repair should not be trusted and the point of weakened aluminum is correct. However, if this is your only transportation and you can't get anything else immediately, I would say it can be ridden until an alternative is found. The front fork is two pieces, and if either side fails (or the center), the front wheel comes off and that ...


8

For context, my current road bike is a 2010 Cannondale Six Carbon, which would be a comparable model to the Madone you're looking at. I would say you will still get much more bike from the used Madone than from any new bike in a similar price range. But to help you out, let's go over what has changed in the last 10ish years in the road biking world at the ...


8

Why is a road bike faster than a city bike with the same effort? Three reasons: Smaller air resistance due to (primarily) smaller frontal area and (secondarily) thinner tires. Smaller rolling resistance due to slick tread pattern, less puncture protection and smaller tread depth, narrow tires and higher tire pressures. (If going or accelerating very fast) ...


8

I posed this question directly to the people at Molten Speed Wax and got this reply: Our product works great in winter, the key is to put the chain on the bike inside and run it through the gears when the chain is still warm from the pot. The reason is a newly waxed chain is very stiff in super cold temps., but if you pre-break in the chain before going ...


7

I think your minimum refurb to bring the bike up to a good standard would be: new wheels; bottom bracket, chain, cassette and chain-rings; housings and cables (shift and brake); tires, brake pads, bar-tape; and a total, thorough cleaning and re-adjustment. This is assuming the derailleurs and shifters are actually working OK, and your LBS just means '...


7

Patches that overlap are less likely to work - even more so if they're those blunt-edged ones. Thin patches that taper off gently will be more likely to work when overlapped. Two patches overlapped may also cause an excessive bump, so I might take off the existing patch and fit the bigger size patch over both holes. On one rare tube I ended up making a ...


7

Bicycles Stack Exchange prohibits recommending products, but we can offer principles to use when shopping. The key to choosing the right bicycle is matching the bike to the kind of riding you want to do. I apologize for the length of the post - this is a complicated topic. Generally speaking, you can narrow your search to just a few bikes by: ...


7

Triathlon and time trial bikes are quite expensive and not wonderful to ride on open courses, hills, and in groups (in other words, general cycling). So, if you're not so serious about triathlons that you're willing to spend several thousand dollars on a bike that will see relatively little use, you'll likely be content with your existing road bike whose ...


7

Generally, wide tires have lower rolling resistance than narrow ones, and they will be more comfortable due to cushioning. Hence, there's an argument you could go all the way up to a 45mm tire, the maximum I think your bike will clear. For performance-oriented road riders, aerodynamic considerations might come into play, but these are probably irrelevant ...


7

I'm surprised to see that no one else mentioned it, and this isn't a terribly detailed answer, but that road has what motorcyclists refer to as the dreaded "tar snakes". The tar they use to patch cracks ends up very smooth, and depending on weather conditions can get polished even more by traffic. Especially in wet conditions, that thin line of tar can be ...


6

Six years after the original question (2019) road bikes have branched into several sub types, each optimised for certain type of riding. Yet, several are quite versatile. Road bikes for races stayed very much the same in their scope of use as they were in the past. Today they are specialised on aerodynamics and or lightness for climbs. While gearing became ...


6

Adjusting the bearing is quite easy although it's more than just unscrewing the 2.5mm hex-screw at the left side of the hub. Here's the link to an instruction sheet from Campagnolo. https://www.campagnolo.com/media/files/035_68_Technical%20manual_wheels_adjustment_hub%20Campagnolo_12-12.pdf While the PDF describes how to remove excessive play easing an ...


6

Very likely, yes. Your cog is 3 teeth larger, so the chain will need to be 1.5 halflinks longer which rounds to 2 half or 1 full link, OR you may be able to move your wheel forward if you have trackends instead of dropouts. If you can't get the wheel further forward, then you will definitely require more links in the chain. Given you're changing cog its ...


6

First thing is ( as suggested by @whatsisname )go back to the shop and ask for an exchange, explaining why. Worst happens is they say no. Presuming they say no, have a conversation about about finding a way to get you onto a bike that suits better. You will essentially have have two choices - try to make the bike suit you better, which will almost ...


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