41

Having made the change myself, I can confirm that shock absorbers are actually detrimental to city riding. You lose a lot of power, especially when trying to stand on the pedals for acceleration. Road bikes are also typically much lighter, which in my experience not only helps you go uphill faster, but also makes it a lot easier to carry the bike when ...


26

16 km/h is so slow that even the worst tyres should keep you up, unless something like oil spills were involved. If something is so slippy that you fall without warning at such low speeds there is not much one could do. If you have a hunch this might happen tripodding corners or getting off the bike may help. The first drizzle after a long dry spell can ...


23

Simply unweighting the saddle is enough to roll over most tree roots even on skinny tyres. On my 28mm tyres I don't even need to bother doing that very often. You may want to lift the front wheel in severe cases, or on the very lightest (low spoke count) front wheels.


21

Generally it's absolutely fine to buy a relatively new bike, and not worry about component availability. Bicycles are not like cars that have specific components for each model, or at best some component sharing across a manufacturers models. In general, practically all bicycle components are standardized so that bicycles can be built up (or modified) with ...


17

The bike can handle those bumps just fine. As noted in other answers, just use the usual techniques for dealing with uneven terrain: get your weight off the saddle, keep your arms and legs loose, and let the bike move with the bumps as you keep your body's center of gravity in one place. That said, unless you're riding your bike completely stripped down of ...


16

Some representative values from http://bikecalculator.com/veloUS.html. It's a road-bike calculator, so it's not quite accurate. I simulated a hybrid/city bike by having the rider on a 30-lb road bike with MTB tires, and riding that "road bike" in the least aerodynamic position possible. Note that the difference between a road bike and an actual ...


16

In places where it rains very little or hasn't rained in a while and then a light rain falls, the water is not enough to "wash" the road surface; instead it only wets fine dust and oils that are on the surface. These oils come from cars' engines and exhausts, but are not noticeable at first sight. This mix turns into a fine, paste-like substance that is very ...


16

Another possible cause is misadjusted rim brakes where the brake pad makes contact with the tire's sidewall.


15

I believe your bike has a double crankset with 50-34 chainrings. The general advice is to attempt to avoid cross-chaining, i.e. avoid the big ring and biggest 2-3 cogs in the rear, and avoid the small ring and smallest 2-3 cogs in the rear. There is actually some empirical testing that shows that these combinations create higher friction in the drivetrain, ...


14

Let's assume you are talking about speed on a non-inclined surface for a given level of effort. (When we talk about how 'fast' a bicycle is we can also mean how well it accelerates from a standstill or low speed, or how well it handles around turns or on a bumpy surface.) Constant speed is achieved when power applied to the pedals is equal to the power lost ...


14

To fall to the inside of the turn means that the bottom of the wheel has slid to the outside. When that happens, it is really quick. I would look back at the corner and see if there's a metal plate in the roadway, which are terribly greasy when wet. Other possibilities include round grit/gravel/dust/sant that acts as a ball bearing, and oils on the ...


14

Adding pictures to Weiwen's answer... Here is a picture of a brake lever with the part in question circled in blue. It is a quick release mechanism integrated into the brake lever that allows increasing the space between the brake pad and the rim for easy wheel removal. Flipping the lever to the right or left in effect makes the brake cable longer allowing ...


14

Almost all road bikes have your torso leaning forward to some degree, meaning you have to hold your head up constantly. If you've never ridden a true road bike before, you've probably never had to do that. What's the longest ride you've done on a road bike before this two-hour ride? Since you didn't mention your hands or arms hurting, you're probably not ...


13

Aluminum alloy is weakened by being bent. The seat-stay is bowed in so that loads will tend to bend the stay more. The stay probably will not fail suddenly, but it will develop a crack where it's bent if you keep riding it. It's probably OK to ride on temporarily, even if the stay does fail the other stay will support the wheel. You say the bike is a Cube ...


13

Safe - probably yes. Good idea - no. As Argenti Apparatus stated, the bike should not fail without some warning, but it probably will fail sooner or later. As people noted in the comments - the geometry seems to have been changed - the wheel seems to be pointing slightly to right, the drop-out seems out of plane etc. The hub axle might be bent, also the ...


13

Yes. It needs to be replaced. When the rubber tread is worn so far down the carcass is showing the tire is dangerous. The fabric carcass cannot provide grip like the rubber can so you risk losing grip in a corner and wiping out.


11

No sorry, this is not practical. Freewheels mostly stopped at 7 speed, and 8 speed was rare because of excess unsupported axle causing bent axles due to leverage. Your suggested plan would require fitting 8 speed shifters and an 8 speed rear mech. That's too much faffing about when you want to swap wheels. Instead, you could find an 11 speed hub with the ...


11

The rear wheel is normal size (700), the front wheel is smaller (650). It was for aerodynamic reasons. By lowering the torso of the rider, the frontal surface of the rider became smaller. The configuration appeared first in triathlon and was later banned by the UCI in road and track events. Both wheels must now be of identical size i.e. 700.


10

There are a bunch of bikes sold in the UK that are specifically designed for the cycle-to-work scheme: they have good specs for commuting, are priced to come in under the £1000 limit, etc. A number of online vendors stock these. So that would be a good place to start. Or find someone selling one of those bikes used. The additional weight of a steel bike is ...


10

In addition to the previous answers, your tire pressure was likely too high for the conditions. If you know you're going to be riding in the rain, it's usually a good idea to lower your tire pressure from what you would normally have them at in dry conditions. A lower tire pressure allows the tire contact patch to deform more, thereby increasing the amount ...


10

There is little research on the impact of crank length on power output in cycling. There are some lab studies, and they seem to show that even for crank lengths significantly shorter or longer than the norm, the metabolic cost to maintain a specified speed or power output in the lab doesn't change. Importantly, some of these studies included lengths ranging ...


10

Do you both have a speedo on your bike's handlebars for reading the current velocity, (ie speedometers/head units/bike computers/) ? It can be very hard to ride on feel, so one of the better ways to pace a group is to pick a target speed that is not flat-out, and the lead should aim for that speed. When the leader feels its time to rotate, then you gently ...


10

People tour on all kinds of bikes. That said, if you're going to tour on the Domane, you'll need to figure out how you'll be carrying your gear, since (as Argenti mentions in his comment), it doesn't have any mounting points for racks. There are workarounds for mounting a rack (which come with compromises), and increasingly people are bikepacking‚ÄĒusing frame ...


9

Given your budget you'll be looking at aluminum or steel framed bikes, but that's fine. There are many choices of steel or aluminum drop-bar bikes available. The first thing I would think about is how much gear do you need to carry when commuting? Can you carry everything you need in a backpack or will you need panniers or other on-bike luggage? mass is ...


9

That is a brake quick release lever. Sometimes, our tires are slightly too big to fit through the brake pads when we remove a wheel from the bike. That quick release lever releases a bit of cable, thus opening the brakes wide enough to extract the tires without issue. On most modern rim brake bicycles, I believe the fashion has been to put the lever on the ...


9

I think it's likely that the frame is just to large for you. A medium frame is generally too large for a person 5'4" (approx. 162cm) in height. What's going in is that distance from the saddle to the bars is likely too long, causing you to have to lean forward too much, which is causing your pelvis to rotate forwards also. When sitting on a bicycle ...


8

Why is a road bike faster than a city bike with the same effort? Three reasons: Smaller air resistance due to (primarily) smaller frontal area and (secondarily) thinner tires. Smaller rolling resistance due to slick tread pattern, less puncture protection and smaller tread depth, narrow tires and higher tire pressures. (If going or accelerating very fast) ...


8

I posed this question directly to the people at Molten Speed Wax and got this reply: Our product works great in winter, the key is to put the chain on the bike inside and run it through the gears when the chain is still warm from the pot. The reason is a newly waxed chain is very stiff in super cold temps., but if you pre-break in the chain before going ...


8

According to the 2017 Catalog on the Orbea website, the M40 comes with Shimano Tiagra 4700 components, which are serviceable if not fancy. For an entry bike they'll do fine, and Tiagra 4700 is still the current model per the Shimano website. Even once Shimano updates the Tiagra line, there will still be lots of older components available and Shimano will ...


8

Whilst the shoes are marketed for SPD-SL cleats because that is the Shimano system and you have Shimano shoes, this is really referring to what we call a 'three-bolt' pattern. Both SPD-SL and the look cleats are a 3 bolt pattern so the cleats are compatible with the shoes. See how there are another two bolt holes in the middle of the three-bolt pattern - in ...


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