New answers tagged

1

Looks like you have done the research and You have a good idea of what you want to do and how you are going to execute it. You have a torque wrench and know what the torque specs are. The only thing I have found difficult about crank replacement is the axle can be tight in the bearing inner races and requires some force to get it through. If you want to ...


1

Get a Cyclo-cross bicycle. I recently got one and: have hydraulic disk brakes have RD clutch am nearly as fast as a roadie control in the hoods of the 44cm handlebars feels close to MTB do trail riding on it, including rock gardens drop 1 meter with it (as much as my timidity allows on an MTB) is equipped with the new Shimano GRX 2x10 costs 800EUR have ...


0

It looks like I'd need new break/shift levers to go with the handlebars No you don't need brake/shift levers. You need brake levers. You need shift levers. But you don't need brake/shift levers. The latter are an unfortunate invention that bicycle component manufacturers sell to unsuspecting buyers of road bikes at great cost. It's much better to have ...


2

The events and symptoms you describe don't give a clear picture of what happened. At the end of a ride a week ago something happened inside it and it stopped shifting altogether all of a sudden. The feeling was as if something disconnected/snapped. This is consistent with a cable snapping at the head. Some past versions of Shimano STI shifters may have had ...


2

I used to ride 12 centennials a month with a crew for several years. The answer is not to restrain your power so you don't flex the frame, the answer is to get a more durable frame. We rode French, Italian and German road frames; Peugeot, Colnago, and Daimler. I don't remember one frame failure. The frames were steel with lugs and silicon bronze brazed ...


1

When does it squeak? If it squeaks even while you are coasting it can’t be the bottom bracket, chain, pedals or rear derailleur. If it only squeaks while you are coasting it could be the free wheel. If it squeaks all the time it could be the brakes (should be more of a rubbing sound) or hub bearings (though those usually don’t “squeak”).


4

I've not worked on this kind of wheel before, but it looks like the ball-end of the spoke is retained in a recess in the hub, and there's a big C clip stopping them from moving sideways (or up as in this photo) Option 1: Use a pair of circlip pliers in the Green gap, to spread Yellow circlip apart and ease them over the Red fixed plate. Do be careful ...


1

The geometry varies between bikes, so what would be fine in one brand may be too big or small in another. It is important to try it out for comfort. I would recommend getting a second hand bike if you can try it out. I am also 5'11" and male. When I wanted to get back into cycling I bought a cheap, second hand bike. 5 years later, I am still riding it! ...


3

Actual buying advice is not allowed in stackexchange. I suggest you go to a local bicycle store (NOT a car spares store or grocery that just happens to have some bicycle-shaped objects), and get their advice. They'll probably guide you towards something that they sell, but at this price range, that's not bad, Anything they sell will be better quality than ...


-1

The main differences between folding bead and wire bead are Wire bead has a metal loop in each side where the folding bead has a kevlar belt The wire bead tyre weighs a little more than the folding tyre, compare the specs for exact numbers The folding tyre takes less room so you could pack a spare tyre with you in less space than a fullsize tyre. 3b. Also, ...


3

Folding bead alone will not affect your ride in a notable manner. Here are some things which will affect the ride a lot more than whether it's folding or wire bead: Tyre width (bigger = smoother) Tyre pressure (lower = smoother) Rim width (wider = smoother) The difference between folding and wire beads are not really about comfort. You could argue that the ...


2

Looks like you're in Europe, and that website has chosen to reject your traffic because of that. I've just tested from an AWS host in Frankfurt and seen the same result. The text is You're probably wondering why you've landed here of all places. Well, as of 25.05.2018, CompetitiveCyclist is no longer available outside the US due to GDPR regulations..."...


4

For road racing and racing, get a road bike. A true road bike will not only be faster, but have better handling and be generally more fun to ride. Pay attention to fit and don't buy a bike without trying it unless you really know what you are doing. Modifying a mountain bike for road use will get you a bike that is not very good for either road or off road ...


1

I would peel the rim tape off, and then carefully file off the high spots. Then stop and reassess and if it seems okay I'd use emery cloth to smooth it out completely. If the pits feel too deep, you might fill them with JB Weld or similar. You need a smooth surface for the tube to rest on. If you reuse the rim tape, consider flipping it 180 degrees to ...


4

In the photo it looks like you have damaged the rim tape, not the actual rim. You should be able to replace it without touching the rest. The tape on photo says tubeless ready: if you are planning to go tubeless you should replace it with similar one, but if you plan to use tubes, any high pressure tape will work.


1

The point is not to lean the bike to either direction when riding out of the saddle. It is merely a consequence of pushing on the pedal that's on the down stroke, which causes a torque at the bottom bracket, and not compensating this enough by either pushing on the other pedal and opposite side of the bar (low power) or pulling on the bar on the same side (...


7

Only you can decide if you "need or "want" a road bike. I would not upgrade your mountain bike in an attempt to make it a better road bike. As the saying goes a pig wearing lipstick is still a pig. If you want to road ride for a change of scenery or pace buy a used quality built bike. The used market should have lots of bikes suitable to the ...


0

To help with part of your question, MTB lifespan all depends on how rough your trails are. At some point, parts start breaking so fast it's just refreshing to buy a whole new bike. You also need to factor in whether you can afford to replace broken parts as well. Rear derailleurs, spokes, rims, and tires wear and break surprisingly often, and this can add up ...


1

You lean the bike in the direction of the leg pushing down? That's quite unusual. When you sprint, you're effectively throwing all your weight on one leg, then the other. If you were to just stand on one pedal with the bike vertical, you'd flip over the bike from the one-sided force. To counteract this asymmetry, most people lean the bike opposite to the ...


1

Every bike is an engineering compromise, so you got to know what you want in order to get it. For example a road bike is optimized for speed, which means good aerodynamics, low rolling resistance and low weight at the expense of everything else, notably comfort, ability to ride on any road that isn't smooth enough, luggage carrying capacity, etc. A mountain ...


0

To give some background I mean I am probably doing around 50km (31 miles) a week. That's not a lot for a period as long as a week. I cycled 43km yesterday. I had a 5-year break from cycling and have cycled only about 300km since the break. Before the break, I used to do 50km ride daily, and my longest rides were 100km. However, we can observe something from ...


0

Found the solution. Heres how you remove it:


-8

I am not bothered with the cutting of the foam if it is just cosmetic but obviously I would need to know that the helmet is not compromised before I can use it. Every single helmet built barely to spec is compromised. If you consider the bicycle as a rod whose weight is evenly distributed, when the bicycle falls with tire contact point as the pivot point, ...


1

Unfortunately the mechanic didn't express the issue very well to you, or used vocabulary that you haven't come across before, but the best person to ask for clarification is that mechanic. He is the only one of us who has been hands on with the bike. I would expect normal headset adjustment to be part of a tune up, and the fact you say he tightened something,...


1

The tube you’ve circled is the head tube. Inside the tube, on the top and bottom are the headset bearings which allow your fork to turn smoothly. The bearing play or preload has to be set correctly with the vertical screw on top of the stem cap. If there is play in the bearings allowing the fork to rock back and forth you’ll have to adjust the preload. To do ...


0

Here is a different way of thinking of things. All bottom brackets are designed for a certain type of BB cup. Cannondale has chosen the PF30 standard for this frame, and it requires the BB to accept cups that are 46mm in diameter, with a BB width of 68mm. There are, as you know, other specifications. Mostly independent of the BB cup specs, crank spindles ...


1

They look to be compatible. The website says they'll work with any road DUB BB, which you have. Changing the spider shouldn't be too difficult as long as you follow the video. You can also find more info on the SRAM Service website. For example, here's the spider and chainring installation guide. Here's the DUB BB compatibility manual: DUB™ MTB and Road ...


0

Fear not. A 32mm wide tire can perfectly well carry your weight. I weigh about as much as you do. My bike has 28mm wide tires. I don't get constant pinch flats. The trick is to fill the 28mm tire to 100psi / 7bar with a floor pump and do so weekly. Air diffuses rapidly out of even butyl tubes. Two weeks without pumping and the tires have lost so much air ...


1

I have a 38/48T crank setup and 11-30T cassette on my custom-built Surly Long Haul Trucker. Originally the 38/48T crank set was a triple (28/38/48T), but I removed the smallest chainring, not foreseeing any use for it, and adjusted the front derailleur to not drop the chain from the 38T chainring to the removed chainring. Most of the time, I use the 48T ...


1

I did the exact same thing a long time ago. I wonder what width tyres you used? Basically, I had a touring bike which I used for "rough" touring, and used the 38c version of this tyre. It was fine at lower pressures in rough roads. I then bought a set of 25c versions for a winter road bike. Horrible! These, tyres are not designed for smooth roads and ...


0

Let's compile a list of the best reasonable looking experiments we can find (single rider on both bikes in same route at the very least). These appear to be on relatively flat good tarmac and results were measured with Strava: unclipped 17 mi flat MTB 15.7 mi/h avg 427 cals road: 17.6 mi/h avg 413 cals ...


1

A bit of an unorthodox solution here, since you want something that "looks sleek". Some cross-country running race shoes have spikes in the forefoot like a track racing shoe, while the rest of the sole is lugged rubber. In order to attach the spikes securely, there is a "spike plate" which can substantially increase the stiffness of the forefoot of the shoe. ...


0

Echoing Adam Rice, The shoes and pedals that are appropriate for road cycling are the ones you feel comfortable using. Speaking for myself and some of my roadie friends, MTB shoes are more convenient off the bike and no less effective on it. I have a CX frame with a set of Crank Brothers Double Shot pedals, wherein one side is a very sizable platform ...


3

This is exactly what I have done with my girlfriend. Large flat pedals Toe cage (without side straps), I picked this particar one because it's made from a pretty strong plastic/nylon so it doesn't flex much. Zefal MT 45 These imrpove pedalling efficiency from just flats and don't get in the way when the rider wants to unmount. If she wants to consider ...


6

The shoes and pedals that are appropriate for road cycling are the ones you feel comfortable using. Almost all MTB shoes come with a "plug" over the screw-hole recess that you could just leave in place. Make sure that's the case with any pair she has her eye on, if she decides to go that route. These probably won't be ideal, as they're still designed to ...


3

I'm not going to discuss whether she should be using full clipless instead here – that's another topic. I guess you've already tried to convince her for it? Seeing that she doesn't: why exactly did you choose clipless shoes at all? Those don't make sense if not using clipless pedals too. For flat pedals, you want normal rubber-sole shoes, or special flat-...


3

Solution from mechanic was to seal the tiny hole with superglue. Seems to have worked a treat.


0

I'd be very cautious of the sizing. The size/age range combination seems odd (apart from being a wide range of heights for one size of frame). Going by the WHO height charts used in the UK, that bike would be too big 75% of 12-year-old girls and more than 50% of 12-year-old boys. More worryingly they give the same age range for the 19" model, while for ...


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