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1

The first thing you'd want to do is test ride a bike, and it doesn't have to be one that you plan to buy. If you're completely new to bicycling, then I'd suggest buying yourself a helmet (I like the MIPS helmets) and then borrowing a friend's bike to test out - this goes for an e-bike/road/mountain/city - anything that's new to you, try to borrow one from a ...


6

Yes - your rear tyre has failed internally through being run under-inflated, combined with the heat generated on the roller surface. As such that tyre is no longer suitable to ride on the road. Indoor Trainers are hard on rear tyres - at least the ones that use a roller setup to interface resistance with the tyre. There are roller-specific rear tyres ...


1

You have a good budget to start with and you'll be able to get a good quality bike, properly assembled and all the accessories you need. You should buy a bike from a well respected mass producer that sponsors a grand-tour team if you would like the benefit of good quality service & warranty backup through your local dealer. It's the safest route, though ...


1

I'd say consider where you are planning to ride and choose the bike accordingly. For example: If you plan to ride mostly on roads for long distances, a drop handlebar is preferable as it allows a large variation of hand positions, allowing you to choose an optimal balance between aerodynamics and comfort If you are heavier and not so fit as most people, ...


4

I feel the need to offer an alternative answer here. Buying a "cheap+used" bike (or even "free") is fraught with issues for the beginner cyclist. Bikes almost always fall into the category of "you get what you pay for" and "cheap" in my experience rarely leads to cycling enjoyment. It usually leads to frustration. I ...


0

One thing to know in advance is if you need rack and mudguards. In the past it was easy to add them but now frames are less standard and you may need expensive rack just because it is the only one that still can be installed. Also, if E-bicycle does not come with internally powered lights, in some cases it may be hopeless to add them later. I faced these ...


4

The best thing is to just, start riding. Don't blow all your budget on a bike, start with something cheap+used (or free if you can find something in your family/network) As you ride more, things will become clearer as to your preferences. And you still have most of your capital left to pivot or dive deeper. Consider that used bikes sell for about what they ...


1

I reckon they can last 5 years if you are not doing many kilometres, then the fabric becomes old, and is more prone to crack along the sidewall. But for people riding a lot of miles/kilometres then it's distance and tyre wear that finishes them. Tarmac quality is a big variable, but maybe 10,000 km is possible on smooth roads. I should add that to keep tyres ...


9

Thanks to Criggie's sharp eyes spotting the word "Coventry" From a forum thread here is a match on the head badge The decals on the bike look similar but the lug work looks different. Here is a nice example in the wild The 2020 post says the bike is 37 years old so 1983


1

The badge picture seems to show some (lost in time) engravings on the horizontal band. Try to look/take pictures with different light, to try to read some word or at least letters. In the meanwhile, you may try your luck in one of the biggest digital collections of headbadges that I know of: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bikegeek/albums Or ask at the library ...


5

I see "Coventry" in the scratched out decals. The head tube badge appears to be an eagle, which is often associated with Germany and similar areas. "Cycle Shop Somerton" is probably a bike shop in Somerton, of which there are many, in the UK, US, and Australia according to Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somerton#Places A search ...


4

Off-road a few maximum power bursts up a steep incline will feel exhausting, but don’t burn a lot of calories because the duration is so short. Usually you also have a lot of descents, technical sections etc. where the power output is low. Technical sections might feel exhausting because of all the core and arm strength required but overall the energy ...


6

All that a smartphone app or cycle computer may hope to achieve, is to provide an estimate of the burnt calories. They do this by taking your speed, and possibly climb rate, and some assumptions about you and your bike to derive the likely physical effort required to maintain this speed/climb rate. If you have not told your app how heavy you + bike are, ...


3

All Shimano rear derailleurs of the 6, 7, 8, 9 speed classes, plus road 10 speed (except Tiagra 4700) use the same "actuation ratio." That's a colorful phrase to say that rear derailleurs from these speed classes respond identically to shifter input. For example, many touring bikes with drop bars and, say, 10 speed STI's (road shifters) will use a ...


2

I use a SLX M662 Shadow 9 speed rear derailleur with my Shimano 105 5700 10 speed shifters. The cable pull ratio is similar enough for it to work pretty well. 10 speed MTB derailleurs have a different pull ratio. The advantage is that it allows me to use a 11–34 tooth cassette. The 105 rear derailleur is limited to 11–30 11–28. If you don’t need the ...


1

What you're describing is called a "mullet drivetrain." There are some specific combinations of parts that do work, but in general, you can't mix-and-match parts and get a workable result. The reason is that different shifters pull a different amount of cable per shift, and different derailleurs expect a different amount of cable pull per shift. ...


3

I'd consider that as a last resort rather than a first resort, since you can probably accomplish the same effect by getting a shorter stem and/or raising the stem. If you can't change your position enough that way, you might want to consider getting a bike with different geometry. You can quantify how aggressive a bike's position based on its "stack:...


2

In your case, a proper bike fit might be a good idea. You're definitely not average, so this is outside the remit of your average bike shop. Try and find someone locally who is medically qualified and has the right gear. A mediocre bike fit could take an hour, a good bike fit will take ~2 hours. The bike fit you've already had may have been that, or maybe ...


3

Your post may be hinting at two distinct problems. First, saddle fore-aft position You seem to want a more forward position than you can currently achieve with the bike and with the seatpost you have. I'm not sure what model of seatpost came with the bike. Seatposts can come with setback, i.e. the clamp is positioned rearward of the post's centerline, this ...


1

The frame has some distinctive features, like the bottom bracket location and the connection top tube - seat tube. After a quick search on the internet for images of "giant bicycle cruiser urban" and "giant bicycle" I was lucky enough to strike this picture: which indicates your bicycle is a Giant Suede. The year may vary. Nice bike, I ...


7

As a category, many people use such bikes to commute. It was somewhat more common in the decades where relatively fewer more utilitarian-leaning road bikes existed to buy for those who wanted to commute on a road bike. It's now much easier to buy something with more tire/fender clearance and less racey geometry than when almost all road bikes were made in ...


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