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36

One of the most advanced designs is the "floating rotor", made of two different materials connected together. They look like this: These are exceptional brake rotors. They are very rigid and won't bend sideways easily. Overheating is much less of a problem for these. If they are getting overheated, they don't bend that much because of the material expansion....


20

Centerlock largely exists because since the beginning of modern disc brakes for bikes, Shimano has more or less alone had a weird cautionary take on the physics of rotor bolts theoretically being able to loosen in the six-bolt design. That's why their six-bolt rotors have always come with various retention systems for the bolts that nobody else bothers with. ...


13

Low-profile button-cap socket screws do have a design weakness. The button reduces the amount of material around the head and the recessed hex or Torx socket also does the same, exactly at the interface of the screw body and head. In this zoomed in portion of your larger photo, you can see just how little material connects the head to the rest of the screw: ...


12

Advantages of 6-bolt: Not being patented by Shimano means more vendors offer compatible wheels/disks. Torx bolts require a smaller tool which is often included in many multi-tools so one can always have one on the road. Advantages of Centerlock: Faster installation and removal with a cassette tool; no need to fiddle with 6 separate bolts No need to have ...


11

As long as you existing rotors are in good condition and thicker than 1.6mm (minimum safe thickness) you should have no issue with using them with the Shimanos. There doesn't seem to be an industry standard specification for rotor thickness but it is generally taken to be between 1.8mm - 2.0mm. The new callipers will self adjust to the rotor width. Clean ...


11

A couple more pros of centre lock: Finned rotors One big difference is that you can't get the finned Shimano Ice-Tech rotors used on the road bike groupsets in a 6-bolt configuration. E.g: or I've had brake fade on my Shimano RS685/785 set up on descents in Wales and wanted to try the finned rotors, but my hubs are 6-bolt. You can make a centre lock ...


9

One disadvantage of 6 bolt is that you can torque one side just a bit more than the other which can cause the rotor to be just a bit warped. Center-lock torques evenly by design so there’s no risk.


8

Just called Shimano to ask this question for a customer's bike. For switching from a resin to a metallic padset, the answer is clean rotor with isopropyl alcohol and do a standard bed-in. Didn't ask them about metallic to resin


8

tldr: be sure new rotor works with metal pads or get a set of resin pads. Generally, disk brake rotors of same diameter are thought of as cross-compatible, but there are some edge cases when this might not be true: Rotor thickness might not be the same across manufacturers and disk brake calipers might be designed with thicker/thinner rotor in mind. ...


7

Yes, this should work just fine. CenterLock and ISO six bolt wheels should be interchangeable w/o problems as long as they use the same rotor diameter.


7

Disc brake rotors with the six bolt design are attached with M5 fasteners. To shear off the head of a new M5 bolt requires a considerable torque. The design torque for medium resistance bolt is typically 5 Nm. It ought to take at least twice that torque before it fails so abruptly. A torque of 10 Nm is roughly equivalent to the weight force of 10 kg applied ...


7

TR160-35 is the model number. They are 160mm Centerlock rotors. If your new wheels have Centerlock hubs, then you need either centerlock rotors or adaptors. If the wheels are 6-bolt, then you need 6-bolt rotors. Either way you'll want 160mm rotors and to keep it easy, I'd stick with Tektro rotors for this system.


6

Answering the question: To upgrade to 180mm from 160 you need a Post-Post 180mm adapter and a new disc. The adapters are widely available as 180 is probably the most common sized front disc on MTB's. I think the question that should have been asked is "My front disc is not working as well as I think it should, how can I make it better". As many say, its ...


6

Your best and safest option is to replace the rotor with a new one. Bend metal enough and it will deform permanently. In addition, rotors do wear away slowly over time. There's a chance yours is getting thinner, and more vulnerable to bending. Generally they're ~2 mm thick when new and unservicable at 1.6 mm thick. Finally, if your rotor has ...


5

You've gotta try it out to some extent (e.g. at your LBS). But you'll likely be able to do it with some spacers, tweaking of the brakes and some fidgeting and appropriate part selection. If you do it right, you should have minimal/no adjustment between swapping the wheelsets. It depends on the brakes and rotors you have. In some cases, the rotor will fit ...


5

This doesn't answer your question, but your problem before the question. If your brake body is moving about, the problem isn't the existence of the shim (which is used by all brakes when they upsize) but either: the bolts holding the shim/adapter to the bicycle or the brake to the adapter were not properly torqued and loctited. the bolts holding either ...


5

Rotors are wear items and therefore must be removable. The Cube website does not specify what rotors are fitted, but I strongly suspect they are Shimano Center-lock which have a steel rotor riveted to an alloy ‘spider’. They are fixed to the hub with a central lock ring. Changing the rotor will not improve braking performance, unless you are thinking of ...


4

Normally the manufacturer of the brakes gives some minimum value for the rotor thickness. For higher prized brakes they often even provide some gauge that lets you easily check if the rotor is still thick enough. Typically the minimum thickness might be somewhere below 2mm (I believe to remember that the absolute minimum for Magura discs should be 1.7 or 1....


4

A slightly warped or bent rotor may cause some brake pulsation. The rotor can be straightened with a Park tool DT-2 truing tool. I have had good luck using a large adjustable wrench. Close the jaws around rotor and gently bend the rotor. You most likely won't get it perfect but you can get it back to usable condition.


4

I can't add a comment yet so I provide this as an answer. The guy was bedding or burning-in the brakes. It makes sure the pads are seated and wiped of factory oil, grease, and other contaminants. Disc brake break-in? Sounds like he was doing it wrong. Unless the fact that the brakes weren't working after he did it indicates that the process uncovered a ...


4

Advantages of smaller discs Lighter Less prone to damage Less prone to warping Advantages of larger discs Dissipate more heat More stopping torque The calliper and pad choices are more important than the disk as far as performance. Bigger discs increase performance cheaper than better callipers. At some point, bigger discs are needed to get enough ...


4

This is a common set up, as the majority of your stopping power is assumed to come from the front wheel, and many frames, especially older frames, had less clearance on the rear triangle of the frame, so often the 180mm rotor wouldn't fit. You can change it if you like, but there is little necessity to do so. If you choose to change it, you will only ...


4

Yes this will be fine. The only caveat I can think of is rotor thickness, if you look closely on a rotor or read the manual, you should be able to find the minimum thickness. This is different for different manufacturers but shouldn't affect a hydraulic disc brake, they automatically adjust for pad and rotor wear and will happily clamp a pair of new pads ...


4

Because you are buying new brakes - the best thing to do would be to store your old brakes in the same manner you receive the new brakes. And that would also be re-using the existing packaging. I'm sure the logistics in getting newly manufactured brakes from the production line to the retail counter / customer involves many months of transportation and ...


4

There are two rotor interface types, you need to get something that matches hubs on the new wheelset. As you already noted, rotor diameter should be the same. The rotors should not necessarily be the same, but hub distance and rotor thickness tolerances might (or not) cause brake rub after swapping wheels, but that can be adressed by caliper position (...


4

In addition some rotors claim not to be suitable for metal pads, but all seem to be suitable for organic pads. This is only an issue if you run metal pads.


4

You bought a post mount adapter but needed an IS. Stacking it should put the caliper in the right place and would likely more or less work, but it's not a good idea given the alternative of getting the right part.


3

In my 14 years cycling career only once I had to replace rotor due to wear. And that rotor was 6 years old and used for heavy downhill riding in all conditions. I've gone through a lot of pads on that rotor (like 20-30 pairs). And only when I could actually feel with my fingers the groove on the surface, I replaced it. Also it started eating pads like mad - ...


3

I don't think you'll need to sand them. I would just change the pads and then go out for a ride on a borderline muddy day and splash through all the puddles you can find. You'll get grit on your rotors, which will accelerate the wear-in process. If you do decide to sand them, be very careful. Everything I've ever been taught has been that you don't want ...


3

AFAIK you only need a brake caliper adapter (more weight) and a larger rotor. Your existing caliper should work fine, and the hub bolt pattern should be the same too. You'll need to check that your fork is rated for a larger rotor, and that the rider load limits remain the same.


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