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16

You will need a wheel with a hub that is rotor compatible and fits your bike. There are two main ways to mount a disk brake rotor to the hub. A Shimano centerlock design has splines on the hub to allow a rotor to be attached. Or a six bolt rotor mount Your front hub does not have either of these mounting methods. If the fork is original to the bike then it ...


6

From what I can see, there is no serrated ring and the hub is not a disc-brake compatible one (for either center lock or 6-bolt rotors). Thus, for disc brakes you'll need a new wheel that mounts one or the other style of rotor. The rotor will cost probably an extra $20 or so if the wheel doesn't come with one. It's hard to tell from the photos, but your ...


4

I found a simple solution and it works fine. Cut and place a piece of cookie wrap plastic packaging around the hub spline (0.05mm thick would be ideal) and insert the disc. it will require some pressure and voila ... the problem is over.


3

The gap depicted for your Shimano brakes appears to be of similar dimension to a couple Shimano systems I run. The spacing is very close and I'm often truing the rotors to ride rub free. Shimano hydraulic brakes are self-adjusting in relation of the pad to the rotor, so that when the pad wears, the spacing stays the same. Bed your new brakes in properly ...


3

Its unclear to me what the actual problem is, apart from your feeling the pads are too close. If they are not pulling back far enough and rubbing the disc all the time, it could be stiffness just from being new and unused. Install them and ride... You could try to lube the piston and seals (remove pads, squeeze out pistons and drip oil on them then work them ...


3

This answer may not offer much new but I'd like to share my opinion. The new rotors you have on the new bike are a lower quality than the smaller rotors you had on the old bike. Also, as the new bike is an e-bike, there is more mass to slow down on your descent so the brakes have even more energy to dissipate as heat. The rotors being such a large diameter ...


2

Are you sure the pads were properly bedded in when installed? I'm guessing here, but if the pads where not at the top of their potential performance (i.e. you actually had less braking power) and descended the same routes, you may have unconsciously applied the brakes for longer periods, letting less time for the rotor to cool down between brake applications....


2

'Durability' is rarely the metric that increases with price for any performance bicycle part....! Yes rotors warp more easily with heat as they get larger (in exchange for being able to handle a more demanding single descent where they warp a bit instead of fade out and send you into a tree.) Needing to check everything over and do some tweaks after a ...


2

Fortunately the brake is a cable-actuated non-hydraulic brake and you don't need to worry about fluid loss in this case. The hub looks as if it might have a lock-ring for the disk (that serrated ring on the left next to the spokes), but I'm not so sure when looking at the blown-up picture. In which case you'd need a new front wheel, unfortunately. If there ...


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