Hot answers tagged

44

You don't have pictures of the bike, but honestly, theres not much you need to worry about. Pump up the tires and make sure they hold air. Check that the brakes work (may need new pads, cables). Add a new chain and you're likely good to go. A lot of bikes live outside their whole lives (in rain and snow) and aren't worse for the wear.


25

A chain left outside for a long period, unless freshly oiled beforehand (or in a desert), will be ruined. The rest is worth checking over by someone experienced, but the bike can probably be saved by replacing routine components, and it's probably worth doing. I'd expect to change the brake pads as well (another cheap consumable). The cassette (rear gears)...


16

It's just a little surface rust so it's essentially a cosmetic problem at the moment. Assuming you want to keep the hitch on the bike all the time (that is after all the point of it) then I suggest that after removing any loose material you wipe grease over it to provide a barrier against moisture. You wouldn't have to do it after every use but whenever you ...


11

As long as the crank arms, chain and freewheel turn freely and all as one. Without clunk's, slipping or sticking at any point there should be no need to replace any of it. The surface rust will not prevent it being fit for purpose and should wear off with use and some decent lubricant. You could always try a wire brush to remove surface rust without having ...


10

The effects of rust are typically overstated. Where is you concern? Remove rust (or replace the parts) on moving components such as chains and cables, they will run smoother, more efficiently and quieter. On non-moving surfaces such as frame and handle bars etc, forget about it. Under normal use high quality steel gets nothing more than cosmetic rusting, ...


10

Is this the same bicycle that got knocked by a car? Considering that it has an aluminum frame, I suggest you should carefully check it for cracks. They can actually be easier to spot now that dirt and water has had time to work itself into them. More details can be found in e.g. this question: I was in a collision the other day. What should I check?


10

Rust on a cassette or even a chain is quite normal in this kind of surroundings is quite inevitable. Also it has little impact other than visual. More frequent wiping and greasing of the chain is one of the few remedies. Buy the cheapest cassettes so that it won't hurt your wallet too much if you have to replace more often than usual. What is far more ...


10

The best thing to do is apply a thin layer of grease to the inside of the seat tube and the outside of the post (only the part of the post inside the seat tube needs grease) and set the seat height according to what fits you. The layer of grease will prevent the odd drip from causing rust. If the bike is stored in a dry place after riding in the rain it will ...


10

The only thing that can be done to save the frame is to have patches welded over the holes. You would need the expertise of a professional welder to get it done properly so that the frame is made structurally sound. Unfortunately, you may find that this repair is more expensive than simply finding a similar replacement bike or frame. The welding repair job ...


10

A roof is better than no roof, but not as good as an enclosed space because wind can blow through bring dust and dirt and moisture. Sunlight is also a source of slow continuous damage. For years I kept bikes under a carport that was also sheltered from the sun, and while they still rusted, it was much slower than if they were out in the weather. If safety ...


9

It might be salvageable but the cost of: new chain ($10) new tires and tubes ($25) rear cluster (maybe; $20) new brake cables and pads ($10) new derailleur cables ($10) which is the minimal repair, is going to be around $75 in just parts, that’s if you get the dirt cheapest versions. If any of your bearings or hubs are seized, you’ll need to rebuild them ...


9

The point of waxing is not to rustproof but to lubricate the chain's internals where they articulate. The rest of the wax flakes off quickly. So this wouldn't have the desired effect.


8

If you're getting knee-deep floods it's destroying the bearings along with the chain. You need to hang the bike up somehow.


8

A great rule of thumb is "Dry lube for dry conditions, wet lube for wet conditions". A bit of surface rust on an otherwise well maintained cassette and chain is only a cosmetic problem. If this is a concern, clean the chain, lube with a wet lube, wipe dry. The trick is to 'over lube' the chain and then wipe off the excess. I might be tempted to leave ...


8

To be clear, I would not recommend riding that frame as-is. The clamps of the kickstand probably added rigidity, by removing it the bike will be weaker. If one or both chainstays part then handling will change abruptly, dropping the pedals and BB down toward the road and putting a lot of stress on the chainstays which will bend immediately. The chain ...


7

Chain will rust always after washing (or even light rain or a puddle of water), if not re-lubed. I think this is detrimental to the chain, as it removes material from the rollers and thus contributes to chain stretch. Bolts for stem, handlebars etc. seem to always like to rust after rain or washing. I don't think it is a big deal, but it ruins the look of ...


7

The corrosion can be removed from the steerer with no problems. If the corrosion was bad and extended into where the top headset bearing sits, there might be a problem as the steerer would not fit into the inner bearing race properly. I can see that is not the case here. (Interestingly you can see where the stem and spacers are positioned on the steerer ...


7

The most important thing is that there is no standing water inside the tubes. Usually there are drainage holes around the rear dropouts and bottom bracket. Make sure the holes exist and are not obstructed. You can look inside the frame through the bottom bracket, seat tube and head tube. Some people use oil or wax-based surface treatments against rust, e.g. ...


7

The rust shown is purely cosmetic. Rust removal / Cleaning needs to be done with care. Even with the rubber seal, theres a chance of getting contamination into the bearings. I would use a small wire brush and gently take the worst of off, then spray the surfaces with WD40, a silicon spray or other water repealant/lube spray. Not too much as you don't want ...


7

I agree with Daniel’s comment, I’ve had success with using vice grips to hold spikes myself. Be careful not to use excessive force to prevent crushing the spoke. It may help to add a small “flag” made of tape to each spoke to help visualize spoke vs nipple rotation. Matt’s suggestion of using penetrating oil and heat is a good idea, provided you removed the ...


7

Based on the photos you might not need any parts at all. The chain looks pretty awful, and is likely siezed up, but a good clean is required to see if it needs replacing. I've had some ugly chains that were perfectly functional. Brake pads is a common age item too - they get hard with age and braking performance suffers. But pad replacements are cheap and ...


6

When I was doing bike rehab for Christmas Anonymous I saw many bikes like this. It can be good or it can be bad, depending on how much weather it's seen. First thing is to do the obvious -- wash it (we used a power washer), clean & oil the chain, clean and oil the derailers. If it's been in the weather enough then the cables will rusted solid and will ...


6

There's not much you can do against the evil trifecta of salt, water, and sand. You can use a teflon, graphite, or moly based dry lube but inevitably sand particles are going to gouge the metal and salt+water is going to start corrosion. The problem with chain wear due to sand is that the chains themselves can look good (i.e., not rusty on the outside), ...


6

While I agree with cherouvim that wet lube is a good thing for rust prevention, I would also ask if it's possible to store the bike higher up, perhaps with some kind of simple cover to prevent the rain and salt-spray from getting to it. Perhaps a couple of hooks on the wall and some rope or a simple bench or couple of large stones to stand the bike on. ...


6

Don't pressure hose your bike at all and steer clear of the air compressor. You don't want to force water, air or grit into seals and bearings. I always lightly hose off excess dirt or brush it off, then sponge down with a soapy hot water, then rinse, leave or drip -dry or use a cloth to wipe off excess liquid. Clean the chain, rings, cassette, rims with ...


6

I read Chris Cleeland's answer and was appalled that his was the accepted answer. Let me first state that I used to be a bike mechanic, and I ride through inclement weather year round. As another already stated, WD40 is useful for cleaning, but you should never use it on your drive-train (chain, freewheel, front cogs). You wrote that you are concerned ...


6

Sounds like you have a Quill Stem, which has a single large long bolt going down into the steerer tube, which is part of the fork. Here's a cutaway showing what's inside. Generally speaking they're fairly corroded over time. The thing labelled Clamp in the diagram is more normally known as a wedge or expander. So you need to get some penetrating oil into ...


6

We don’t give specific product recommendations but the following general advice should help reduce rusty chains: don’t store your bike outside. If you do, put it under a breathable cover. Morning dew is a considerable source of moisture so check your bike in the early morning to see if it’s wet. wipe down your chain after it gets wet. Having a dedicated ...


6

As long, as you can easily move the links of your chain, there's no problem. Just lube them and ride them, and they'll be fine. The movement will rub any rust from the critical places. You may need to work the chain for a while before the links become free, a creeping oil should help get the links moving again. That said, there are two ways to ensure that a ...


6

Any amount of rust is removable by sandblasting or chemical means. That's not the problem here though, the real concern is how much frame material have you got left after the rust is removed. The top tube walls may be too thin for the frame to have structural integrity. Remember the steel may be rusted on the inside too, and there may be rust 'pits' that go ...


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